Objects "Mid-Hudson Auction Galleries"

Le Moyne Watercolor, f.14: Cyclamen

f.14: Cyclamen. Jacques Le Moyne de Morgue (1533-1588). Watercolor and gouache on paper prepared as vellum. ca. 1565. 7 1/2 x 5 5/8 inches sheet. 16 1/4 x 14 1/4 inches framed. Provenance: DuMarry (from the inscription on the frontispiece). These magnificent botanical paintings, executed in watercolor and gouache, are part of only the fifth substantial compendium of works by Jacques Le Moyne to be identified to date. Le Moyne was among a rare and exclusive group of artists who specialized in the creation of florilegia. Most examples were printed, following in the tradition of the herbals of such authors as Leonhart Fuchs, but a few original painted florilegia were commissioned by wealthy amateur botanists and aristocrats who wished to have pictorial records of the valuable plants to be found in their gardens. The extraordinary career and oeuvre of the Huguenot artist Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues is unique in the history of art; he worked as a court artist in France, under Charles IX, traveled to Florida in 1564, as official artist and cartographer to the ill-fated French attempt to establish a colony there, and to have ended his career as a highly regarded botanical artist in Elizabethan London, where his patrons included Sir Walter Raleigh and Lady Mary Sidney. The superior quality of the present work is unquestionable. In color and attention to detail the present works relates most closely to that in the Victoria and Albert Museum, but is unsurpassed in the freshness and spontaneity of the images, perhaps reflecting the early date of the manuscript, completed during the earlier part of Le Moyne’s career in France. Each flower seems to burst forth from the sheet, the three-dimensional quality of the composition heightened by the surrounding framing lines. These magnificent watercolors are rare works of the sixteenth century and fully justify Le Moyne’s reputation as one of the most exceptional artists to have worked in Elizabethan England. The delicate nuances of color and three-dimensional quality of the images is truly breathtaking and most skillfully achieved. Each composition stands alone as a masterpiece.Read more

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Titford Sketches of New and Valuable Plants of the

Sketches towards a Hortus Botanicus Americanus; or,. New and Valuable Plants of the West Indies and North and South America. TITFORD, William Jowett (1784-1823). London: Sherwood, Neely and Jones, 1811 - [1812]. 6 parts in one volume. 4to., (11 6/8 x 9 2/8 inches). 4-page list of Subscribers at end. Hand-coloured aquatint frontispiece (margins renewed) and 17 numbered hand-coloured endgraved plates, hand-coloured engraved vignette dedication leaf (some spotting to the first three plates, plate 11 with fore-margin renewed, small marginal repairs to the last three plates). Modern half-calf antique. Provenance: small ink library stamp of Clinton Hall Association on the title-page. First edition, bound from the six original parts issued between 1811 and 1812. With the printed date 1811 altered in manuscript to 1812. Originally born in Jamaica, Titford travelled extensively North America between 1807 and 1810, collecting botanical specimens, which he sent to the Society of Arts with over fifty drawings and a description of each type, classified under the system of Linnaeus, which he intended to publish in a book. On returning to England he ".began preparations for the publication of his Sketches towards a "Hortus Botanicus Americanus". It was issued in six parts in 1811 and 1812 in London by George Stower; the list of subscribers included the prince regent, Louis XVIII of France, the Royal Institution, the Royal Society of Arts, and many eminent botanists in England, Jamaica, and North America. The Critical Review of November 1811 described the first parts of the Hortus as 'a most excellent work for persons learning botany and all things pertaining to natural history and associated sciences' (Critical Review, 333)" (DNB). Nissen, Botany 1968; Pritzel 9370; Plesch, page 436; Sitwell, Great Flower Books, page 144. Guidance: Freeman's, 2008 - $3,125.Read more

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Richepin & Jouas Le Mer Sonnets and Other Poems

La Mer [Sonnets and Other Poems]. RICHEPIN, Jean (1849-1926) - Charles JOUAS (1866 - 1942). Paris: [Charles Hérissey in Evreux for] Maurice Dreyfous, 1886. 4to., (12 2/8 x 9 inches). Half-title with limitation on verso, title-page printed in red and black, dedication leaf , and 48 pages all BEAUTIFULLY DECORATED in full, or in the margins with SUPERB ORIGINAL WATERCOLOUR DRAWINGS BY CHARLES JOUAS. Fine contemporary olive green morocco, each cover elegantly decorated in gilt, the spine in six compartments, with five raised bands, gilt lettered in one, the others decorated with small gilt tools, gilt inner dentelles, signed by the Club Bindery and dated 1900, top edges gilt (extremities a little scuffed). Provenance: with the small leather library label of Robert Hoe on the front paste-down; from the library of Jacques Levy, his sale, Sotheby's, 20th April 2012, lot 280. Limited issue, copy number 6 of 10 copies printed on Imperial Japon paper, signed by the publisher, of a total edition of 500. An extremely handsome copy made unique by the inclusion of 51 original watercolours by the premier French illustrator of the turn of the 20th-century Charles Jouas, who was famous for his depictions of Paris and the Pyranees. The watercolours with which he has embellished Richepin's dramatic poem are both bold and lyrical, emphasizing the imaginative realism of Richepin's poem. Richepin was one of France's more controversial poets. He was also a dramatist and novelist who "examined the lower levels of society in sharp, bold language. As Émile Zola revolutionized the novel with his naturalism, Richepin did the same for French poetry during that period" (Encyclopedia Britannica online). From the distinguished library of publisher and bibliophile Robert Hoe. "Hoe presses printed some of the world's greatest newspapers, including the Herald, World, and Times in New York and The Times (London), as well as Century Magazine. Under Hoe the company continued the apprentice school founded by his uncle. Here several hundred youths at any one time received a basic education and training in mechanics and drafting. For many years some of the leading pressmen in New York City began their careers as Hoe apprentices. Aside from business, Hoe was a well-known figure in New York's cultural life. He was a founder and trustee of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and of the industrial arts school that was attached to it. An avid collector, he assembled one of the greatest private rare book libraries of his day, including two Gutenberg Bibles. The catalog of only those of his books published before 1700 ran to six volumes. When his entire collection was sold in 1911-1912, it brought almost $2 million. Hoe's holdings included examples of bookbinding through the centuries, an interest that prompted him to aid in organizing the Club Bindery, a small custom bindery of which he served for a time as president. In 1884 he was one of the founders of the Grolier Club, an association of bibliophiles. He was its president from its inception to 1888. An address of his to the club, "Bookbinding as a Fine Art," was published in 1886, and in 1902 he brought out A Short History of the Printing Press, in which he placed the history of the Hoe company within the larger framework of the history of mechanical printing" (Irene D. Neu for DNB). See Carolyn Shipman. Catalogue of books in foreign languages published after the year 1600, forming a portion of the library of Robert Hoe, Volume 4, 1909, page 136. Guidance: Sotheby's, April 20, 2012 - $5313Read more

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Ortelius' Theater of the Whole World in English

Theatrum Orbis Terrarum... The Theatre of the Whole World. ORTELIUS, Abraham (1527-1598). London: John Norton and John Bill, 1606. 2 parts in one volume. Folio (18 x 12 inches). 2 hand-colored engraved title-pages, arms of James I, epitaph, portrait, small globe on final verso, and 157 (of 161) hand-colored double-page engraved maps, some HEIGHTENED IN GOLD, the "Life" of Ortelius here bound after the dedication (without 4 maps, Koeman numbers 19, 71, 152, 154 - two from the main atlas “Valentia” and “Italie”; and two from the “Parergon” “Tempe Thessalica” and the second map of the “Foundation and Order of the Germane Empire in the West”, some expert marginal repairs to the title-page and dedication, preliminary leaves and upper outer corners of first 10 maps, occasional minor spots or areas of abrasion, repaired tear along fold of map 157, repaired loss at edge of final leaf). Late 17th-century English panelled black goatskin, elaborately tooled in gilt and blind, both covers with triple border enclosing owner Elizabeth Cairnes's name, cornerpieces incorporating acorn tools, further ornament with urns and flowerheads (expertly rebacked to style). Provenance: front cover gilt-lettered Elizabeth Cairnes (d.1731), wife of Sir Alexander Cairnes; and by descent, through her granddaughter, the wife of the 1st Lord Rossmore, to the 7th Lord Rossmore. THE RARE ENGLISH EDITION OF ORTELIUS'S "THEATRUM", based on the Latin edition of Ortelius's atlas, published by Vrients in 1603. Before sending the plates from Antwerp to England, the versos were erased, the English text then being printed at the Eliot's Court Press by Bradwood. The likely translator of the text from Latin into English is William Bedwell (1561-1632). With 161 maps and further five engraved plates, the English "Theatrum" was "the tallest volume printed in England up to that date... also the largest collection of intaglio prints in a single book yet published in England" (Skelton). Truusje Goedings, renowned expert in Dutch colourists of the 17th-century, writes of this copy: "Very de-luxe coloured copy, contemporary coloured and heightened with gold and silver by one hand. The printer's borders, initials and vignettes in the text were also coloured, these more sober. Gold has been applied to several maps, including the lettering on some. Vrients took prints of the copperplates himself for the whole English edition of ca. 160 maps and plates (Parergon and Add. included), and sent these to the London publisher Norton. Norton printed his English version of the text on verso, and had all maps bound into one volume, creating herewith the tallest volume with the largest amount of prints existing at the time in England. Coloured copies will have been very costly, let alone de-luxe coloured copies. Therefore, Norton will have organized the colouring in England. It was too costly to have it done in advance in Flanders. He will have arranged a master-model, a good coloured copy obtained from Vrients in loose sheets. The colouring of this de-luxe copy is clearly based on the Flemish style, with full colouring in warm hues variating in transparancy and combinations, though it is less monumental and somewhat more precise. This might be due to regional preferences but also to a slightly less routined, so a more careful handling, which gives this colouring an extra value. Evident English traits are the brighter and lighter use of pigments, and especially the use of a different green pigment in a brighter hue. This green is often seen in coloured maps of English provenance. It has been preserved much better than the somewhat heavier green applied in the Dutch Ortelius-editions that often turned into brownish yellow. The warm colour schemes and handling of the colours indicate a colouring around the time of publishing - and not in the time of the actual private binding dating from the end 17th century" (Truusje Goedings). "All the elements of the modern atlas were brought to publication in Abraham Ortelius' "Theatrum Orbis Terrarum". This substantial undertaking assembled... the best available maps of the world by the most renowned and up-to-date geographers... each of Ortelius' maps was engraved specifically for his atlas according to uniform formats" (Shirley). Ortelius first published his "Theatrum…", arguably the first atlas in the modern sense of the word, in 1570, with 70 seventy copper engravings on fifty-three double-folio pages. A businessman native to Antwerp, Ortelius compiled the best existing maps, re-engraved them on a standardized format, and included them with the text in one volume. But, by 1570, he had been dealing in maps and charts for more than twenty years. The death of Ortelius' father in 1535, who had been a wealthy merchant, seems to have placed his family in financial difficulties. When Ortelius was as young as 19 he is recorded as having joined the Guild of St. Luke as 'afsetter' "or colourist of maps and prints. He seems to have reached a very advanced level of skill in this craft, as some customers continued to insist on buying atlases coloured by him personally at a time when he had already developed into a publisher and cartographer/merchant… Ortelius [also] became a trader in books, prints and maps. Much of this trading had to do with the house of Plantin [subsequently publisher of the 'Theatrum']…Soon he was attending the book fair in Frankfurt to buy and sell books, maps and prints for others as well as for himself. He first met Gerard Mercator there in 1554, which marked the state of a life-long professional relationship and personal friendship… " (van den Broecke page 14). Through his work Ortelius became quite the cosmopolitan, he travelled extensively to France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Hungary, Italy, England and Ireland, and as a result had command of several languages. With the publication of the "Theatrum" came tremendous success and wealth. Giving full credit to the original cartographers, the "Theatrum" was so successful that it was printed three times in 1570 alone. In 1574 Ortelius retained the position of Royal Cosmographer to Phillip II and was given a fine gold necklace, worth 1000 ducats. Between 1570 and 1612 the atlas was published in 42 editions and the 7 languages: Latin, German, Flemish, French, Spanish, English and Italian. From the distinguished library of Elizabeth Cairnes, the wife of Sir Alexander Cairnes (d.1732), the 1st Baronet, a banker in Dublin and London, and Member of Parliament for County Monaghan (1707-27) and the borough of Monaghan (1727-32). Sister of Sir Nathanial Gould, Lady Cairnes was evidently a notable bibliophile; her bookplate was engraved by Louis du Guernier around 1715, and has been cited as an early example of allegorical bookplates. Purchased at Christie's 17th November 2004, lot 124. Koeman/Van der Krogt, III, 31:5.Read more

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Merian's Two Great Works on Insects

Dissertatio de generatione et metamorphoibus insectorum Surinamensium: in quâ, præter vermes & erucas Surinamenses, earumque admirandam metamorphosin, plantæ, flores & fructus quibus vescuntur, & in quibus fuerunt inventæ, exhibentur his adjunguntur Bufones, Lacerti, Serpentes, Araneae, aliaque admiranda istius regionis animalcula; omnia manu ejusdem matonae in America ad vivum accurate depicta, & nunc aeri incisa. Accedit appendix transformationum piscium in ranas, & ranarum in pisces. MERIAN, Maria Sibylla (1647-1717). Amerstdam: J. Oosterwyk, 1719. [AND:] De Europische Insecten, naauwkeurig onderzogt, na't leven geschildert, en in print gebragt. Met een korte Beschryving, waar in door haar gehandelt word van der Rupsen begin, Voedzel en wonderbare Verandering, en ook vertoont word de Oorspronk, Spys en Gestalt-verwisseling, de Tyd, Plaats en Eigenschappen der Rupzen, Uiltjes, Vliegen en andere diergelyke bloedeloose Beesjes : hier is nog bygevoegt een naauwkeurige Beschryving van de Planten, in dit Werk voorkomende, en de Uitlegging van agtien nieuwe Plaaten, door dezelve Maria Sibilla Merian geteekent en die men na haar dood gevonden heeft : en door een voornaam Liefhebber in't Nederduits vertaalt..." MERIAN, Maria Sibylla (1647-1717). GORGEOUS BUTTERFLIES FLYING AROUND LUXURIANT FLOWERING OR FRUITING PLANTS" (Stearn) 2 works in one volume. Folio (19 4/8 x 13 4/8 inches). "Dissertatio": Engraved frontispiece by J. Oosterwyk after F. Ottens, vignette title-page, vignette dedication leaf, and 72 full-page plates all hand-colored in a contemporary hand (short marginal repair to frontispiece, small marginal tear with loss to plate 61, some minor offsetting and a few pale marginal stains). - "De Europische Insecten": half-title, title-page printed in red and black, with engraved vignette and 184 plates on 47 leaves all hand-colored in a contemporary hand. Contemporary paneled Dutch vellum over paste-boards, each cover decorated in blind with two panels of multiple fillets with fine globe tools at each corner between the panels, surrounding a central arabesque medallion, spine in 9 compartments with 8 raised bands, the author and title written in manuscript in the second (expertly rebacked preserving the original spine by James and Stuart Brockman, full report available on request, some staining). Provenance: From the celebrated library of Magnificent Botanical Books of Robert de Belder (1921-1995) and his wife Jelena de Belder-Koracic (1925-2003), horticulturists and proprietors of Arboretum Kalmthout, their sale Sotheby's "A Magnificent Collection of Botanical Books... from the celebrated library of Robert de Belder" 28th April 1987. A FINE COPY of the second edition of Merian's MAGNUM OPUS, her "Dissertatio de generatione et metamorphoibus insectorum Surinamensium...", in Latin, and enlarged with 12 full-page plates by Merian's elder daughter Johanna Helena, who moved to Surinam in 1711, not included in the first edition of 1705. BOUND WITH the first folio edition, in Dutch, of the "De Europische Insecten" with the first appearance of the full suite of plates, the companion and complement to her great Surinam work. "It is as remarkable for its botanical as for its entomological content" (De Belder)."It is as remarkable for its botanical as for its entomological content" (De Belder). "THE FIRST TO DEPICT THE LIFE CYCLES OF INSECTS ALONG WITH THEIR PLANT HOSTS; THEY WERE ALSO THE FIRST TO EMPHASIZE INTERACTIONS AMONG THE SPECIES PORTRAYED - THE VERY FOUNDATION OF THE STUDY OF ECOLOGY" (Kay Etheridge "Maria Sibylla Merina: The First Ecologist?", page 1). Merian's study of caterpillars and butterflies and the plants that nourish them was "the work of her lifetime" (Wettengl, p.54), in that the preparation and publication of several parts and editions of her "Raupenbuch", spanned her entire career. Merian herself in her "Studienbuch", now housed in St. Petersburg, Russia, records that she was raising silkworms and other insects by the time she was 13 in 1660. At the end of her life, she was immersed in preparing the third part of the "Raupenbuch" for publication. Daughter of Swiss topographical artist Matthaus Merian, and a Dutch mother, Merian had been raised in Germany. Her first and rarest work, the "Blumenbuch" was issued in 3 parts, each consisting of 12 plates, in 1675, 1677 and 1680, respectively. In 1680 a composite issue appeared of all three parts, newly entitled "Neues Blumenbuch", with two leaves of text containing an introduction and a register of plant names. While in Germany she married the Nuremberg painter Johann Andreas Graff, and published the first two parts of the "Raupenbuch" . Following Merian's own celebrated "metamorphosis" involving a religious conversion, and separation from her husband, Merian travelled with her daughters to Dutch Surinam: "expressly to study and record the insect life of the tropics... this voyage was not only unusual for a woman in her position, it was unprecedented for any European naturalist to venture such an independently financed and organized expedition. In Surinam she worked for almost two years collecting, observing and painting over ninety species of animals and sixty or more species of plants" (Etheridge, page 2). Merian returned from Surinam in 1702, and in 1705, she published her magnum opus, "Metamorphosis insectorum surinamensium". Several editions were published posthumously, at first by her family and later by others. Twelve additional plates were added. "The text and images that inform her volumes are the product of decades of meticulous observations of the life cycles of insects, and her skill in recording what she saw was unmatched by any naturalist who preceded her or by her contemporaries. Not only were her artistic skills much greater than previous artist-naturalists like Conrad Gesner (Swiss, 1516-1565), but most of her images were made from live or freshly preserved specimens. Merian shows moths laying eggs, caterpillars feeding on leaves, and butterflies and lizards alike extending their tongues toward potential food". (Etheridge, page 3). Beautiful, and so accurate are Merian's images, the insects in "Metamorphosis insectorum surinamensium" being depicted lifesize against plants that had been arranged to suit the composition, that in a study reported by Etheridge, 73% of the images of lepidopterans are identifiable to genus and 66% can be identified as an exact species. "This success rate for matching known species to painted images is impressive, particularly when one considers that the identification of all insects in the tropics remains incomplete even today" (Etheridge, page 4). Since Merian painted some of these specimens, they had sadly become extinct, and she is credited with being the only person to have recorded the metamorphosis of some of the Surinam species. In addition to insects and spiders Merian portrayed two species of frog, snake and lizard in the 1705 edition of "Metamorphosis insectorum surinamensium", with additional vertebrates in this second edition. Linnaeus and his follwers used Merian's depictions to name at least one hundred species, and Stearn includes Merian with the small select group whose illustrations formed the basis of most of Linnaeus' early taxonomy of tropical plants "pointing out that actual specimens from such areas were initially rare because collecting them was expensive and dangerous" (Etheridge, page 8). Nissen 1341; Sitwell "Great Flower Books," p. 67; Dunthorne 205; Hunt 467 (1726 edition), 483 (French edition); Landwehr 131; "Oak Spring Flora" 101; Stearn "The Wondrous Transformation of Caterpillars", 1978; Kay Etheridge "Maria Sibylla Merina: The First Ecologist?". http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/merian/.Read more

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De Wit's Sea Atlas in Original Color

Orbis Maritimus ofte Zee. WIT, Frederick de (1630-1706). Amsterdam: F. de Wit, 1690. Folio (21 x 12 4/8 inches). Engraved allegorical title-page showing the globe surmounted by the figure of Atlas with printed index listing 27 subjects on verso, 27 double-page engraved charts, and 1 fold-out map, all with FINE CONTEMPORARY HAND COLOR (occasional light offsetting). 19th-century calf antique with blind floral tooled borders (re-backed, repair on front hinge). Provenance: engraved armorial bookplate of Baron de Launoit on the front free endpaper; Christopher Henry Beaumont Pease, Lord Wardington (1924-2005), Library of Important Atlases and Geographies, Sotheby's 10th October 2006, lot 541. A late issue of this remarkable sea atlas. A dramatic image of Atlas pressed against the ceiling of a star filled sky, perched at the top of a globe depicting Europe, Asia, and Africa (with the western edge of Australia unidentified in the lower right) opens this incredible atlas. All maps very clear with coloring still bright and vibrant, particularly the large fold-out map of Europe and North Africa. Pages turn as if they were bound yesterday with maps that lay flat, making this a wonderful presentation copy. More than a collection of detailed maps of every known corner of the Earth, his work serves as a world tour in the form of the fanciful and imaginative cartouches and map embellishments that illustrate this impressive atlas. A wonderful polar projection is enrobed in scenes of whalers killing and processing what look like giant trout, and a particularly jarring scene accompanying the map of Russia depicts a bear hunt in the wild. While most of the map details draw on the work of earlier cartographers, for this edition deWit draws on his substantial skills as a realiser of scenes from the vast Unknown to tickle the imaginations of readers safe at home. Truly the Hieronymus Bosch of Atlas illustration. "It's an amazingly attractive sea atlas and, unlike Goos, Doncker, Robijn, Van Keulen etc., it seems to have been continuously revised and updated... I have since added a copy of the last (third) state of de Wit's chart of the Channel which shows the coastline of France and the Channel Islands re-engraved" (Lord Wardington). Koeman IV, Wit I; Phillips 485.Read more

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Unique Author's Proof of Domenech's Journal d'un

Journal d'un Missionnaire au Texas et au Mexique. DOMENECH, Emmanuel (1825-1886). [Paris: Librairie de Gaume Freres, ca 1856]. 8vo., (9 x 5 6/8 inches). Half-title. (Bound without title-page and folding map). Near contemporary grey paper wrappers (rebacked, frayed at the edges). Provenance: Annotated and corrected throughout by the author. THE AUTHOR'S CORRECTED PROOF COPY, heavily annotated throughout by the author in preparation for the first edition published by Gaume Freres in 1857. In addition to correcting numerous small typographical errors l'Abbe E. Domenech has altered a significant proportion of the text: changing vocabulary, removing and adding whole sentences, and making comments in the margins. A note on the first page indicates that to help the typographer understand his corrections Domenach appended his original manuscript with this proof, now no longer present. "A Catholic priest, Domenech was born at or near Lyons, France, on November 6, 1825, to Gabriel and Jeanne (Fournier) Domenech. The elder Domenech was a bottle-top manufacturer. Emmanuel was recruited as a missionary by Bishop Jean Marie Odin and traveled to America in 1846 with Claude M. Dubuis and his companions. Upon finishing his theological studies at the seminary of the Barrens in St. Louis, he was ordained in San Antonio on October 1, 1848; he may have been the first priest to be ordained in Texas. Although he worked in New Braunfels and Brownsville and traveled to surrounding communities, he was officially stationed first at Castroville, then at Eagle Pass. In 1852, because of his distaste for the hardships of missionary life and continuing poor health, he returned to France, where he served as a priest and began a supplementary career as a travel writer and amateur ethnologist. His "Journal d'un missionaire au Texas et au Mexique," published in Paris in 1857, was translated into English in 1858 as "Missionary Adventures in Texas and Mexico." The book describes the trials of early Catholic missionaries and is filled with vivid sketches of the Texas frontier and anecdotes about its people. He found Houston "infested with Methodists and ants" and dismissed Austin, "the seat of the Texian legislature, as "a small dirty town" with "only one wretched hotel." . In 1864 Domenech accompanied French troops into Mexico as a chaplain; he later became press secretary to Emperor Maximilian. His three-volume "Histoire du Mexique" (Paris 1868) is made up of extracts from hundreds of unedited letters and documents of the years 1848 to 1869, from both Mexico and Texas, to which he had access. He published many repetitious, exaggerated, and self-glorifying accounts of his experiences and travels, but his colorfully detailed narrative of the establishment of the Catholic hierarchy in Texas, amid the tensions of boundary disputes with Mexico and the devastation of an epidemic of cholera, has no counterpart. He died of apoplexy and was buried at Lyons, France, on September 9, 1903 with military honors." (Ann Lozano "The Handbook of Texas" online). Graff 1119; Howes D408; Palau 75066; Sabin 20549.Read more

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