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Appointment of "Pakid and Amracal" on behalf of the Safed kollels. Safed, 1872

[1] leaf, paper. 13x21 cm. Scribal handwriting and [12] signatures of the Rabbis of Safed, including Rabbi Shmuel Akko, Rabbi Aharon Kersineti, Rabbi Yosef Mizrachi, Rabbi Shmuel Heller and Rabbi Refael Zilberman. All the signatures - other than one - are legible and identifiable. This is a joint appointment by all Safed kollels, Ashkenazim and Sephardim, bestowed upon Rabbi Meir Rubens, from the committee of Pekidei V'Amraclei Eretz Yisrael in Amsterdam, to represent them in the entire process of collecting and distributing charity funds, to all the city's needy and sages, both Ashkenazic and Sephardic. was the president of the Vaad Pekidi V'Amraclei Eretz Yisrael in Amsterdam. "He was a honorable person...elevated and lofty, the president of the Pekidim V'Amraclim...Amsterdam...he excelled in his good, pure heart for everything holy and he dedicated his heart and soul to everything related to charity. Above all, charity for Eretz Yisrael was stamped in his heart...and his goals were holy and dedicated to those who sat before Hashem in the courts of Zion.....and he with each act of charity he distributed without differentiating between Ashkenazim and Sephardim...when he was old...he still did not rest, and his hands were completely filled with work, the entire day....he spent little time on his personal affairs but turned his heart to the Divine will, to increase and honor Torah and to increase charitable activities. Above all, to increase the honor of the Vaad HaPekidim V'Amraclim for the benefit of Eretz Yisrael..., to which work he never said "enough." (From , two eulogies upon the death of R' Meir ben R' Shlomo Rubens ztz"l...Jersualem 1909.) was the president of the Vaad Pekidi V'Amraclei Eretz Yisrael in Amsterdam. "He was a honorable person...elevated and lofty, the president of the Pekidim V'Amraclim...Amsterdam...he excelled in his good, pure heart for everything holy and he dedicated his heart and soul to everything related to charity. Above all, charity for Eretz Yisrael was stamped in his heart...and his goals were holy and dedicated to those who sat before Hashem in the courts of Zion.....and he with each act of charity he distributed without differentiating between Ashkenazim and Sephardim...when he was old...he still did not rest, and his hands were completely filled with work, the entire day....he spent little time on his personal affairs but turned his heart to the Divine will, to increase and honor Torah and to increase charitable activities. Above all, to increase the honor of the Vaad HaPekidim V'Amraclim for the benefit of Eretz Yisrael..., to which work he never said "enough." (From , two eulogies upon the death of R' Meir ben R' Shlomo Rubens ztz"l...Jersualem 1909.)Rabbi Rubens' previous appointment as Pakid and Amracal of the holy cities occurred when his father passed away in 1857. It was published in the ection five, under the title "eight contracts sent by all the kollels...in the holy city of Jerusalem, Safed, Hebron, Tiberias...Acharai Mot...Shlomo Zalman Rubens...next to three of my dear friends...Meir Rubens, Yonatan Levi Goldmitsan and Yosef Keizer...and these are the names of those who will be called Pekidim V'Amrcalim of the holy city, those who live in the praiseworthy city, Amsterdam."Rabbi Rubens' previous appointment as Pakid and Amracal of the holy cities occurred when his father passed away in 1857. It was published in the ection five, under the title "eight contracts sent by all the kollels...in the holy city of Jerusalem, Safed, Hebron, Tiberias...Acharai Mot...Shlomo Zalman Rubens...next to three of my dear friends...Meir Rubens, Yonatan Levi Goldmitsan and Yosef Keizer...and these are the names of those who will be called Pekidim V'Amrcalim of the holy city, those who live in the praiseworthy city, Amsterdam." Minimal, light aging-stains, Lightly worn in the margins, not affecting text. Very fine condition.Read more

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Chanuka Menorah. Hallmarked silver, Berlin. Beginning of the 19th century

Nice backplate menorah. Repousse and chasing. Two marks. Blurred maker's mark.Maximal height: 13.5 cm. Width: 12.5 cm. Thickness: 70 cm.The front is engraved with rococo scrolls and shellwork. The body of the menorah is shaped like a rectangular box that is divided into eight compartments. Each compartment has a small, protruding tongue holding a small cylinder to support the wick. The compartments are covered by a hinged lid with floral engraving. The right side of the backplate bears a tall shamash, apparently not original. The Menorah stands on four triangular legs, decorated with leaves. Nice backplate menorah. Repousse and chasing. Two marks. Blurred maker's mark.Maximal height: 13.5 cm. Width: 12.5 cm. Thickness: 70 cm.The front is engraved with rococo scrolls and shellwork. The body of the menorah is shaped like a rectangular box that is divided into eight compartments. Each compartment has a small, protruding tongue holding a small cylinder to support the wick. The compartments are covered by a hinged lid with floral engraving. The right side of the backplate bears a tall shamash, apparently not original. The Menorah stands on four triangular legs, decorated with leaves. Nice backplate menorah. Repousse and chasing. Two marks. Blurred maker's mark.Maximal height: 13.5 cm. Width: 12.5 cm. Thickness: 70 cm.The front is engraved with rococo scrolls and shellwork. The body of the menorah is shaped like a rectangular box that is divided into eight compartments. Each compartment has a small, protruding tongue holding a small cylinder to support the wick. The compartments are covered by a hinged lid with floral engraving. The right side of the backplate bears a tall shamash, apparently not original. The Menorah stands on four triangular legs, decorated with leaves. This type of Menorah was designed according to the popular Frankfurt Menorahs of the 18th century. The different designs were created in workshops in Hanau, Franken and Schwaben, but their decorations and metalwork are more primitive than the ones created by the Frankfurt silversmiths.Refer to the catalogue of the Jewish Museum London, item 239, for a similar item. This type of Menorah was designed according to the popular Frankfurt Menorahs of the 18th century. The different designs were created in workshops in Hanau, Franken and Schwaben, but their decorations and metalwork are more primitive than the ones created by the Frankfurt silversmiths.Refer to the catalogue of the Jewish Museum London, item 239, for a similar item. Very fine.   Read more

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Book of sermons in the hand of a Torah genius. Shavlan, [1852-1883]

280 pages, of which 160 bear written text. 15x21 cm. Apparently written by Rabbi Shmuel, Av Beit Din of Shavlan, childhood friend of Rabbi Yisrael Salanter, a close disciple of the author of. One of his questions was printed in siman 19. The author's grandson commented, "This is HaRav HaGaon Shmuel ztz"l who was later Av Beit Din in Shavlan, and then studied in Karlin and then spent time in the shadow of the Gaon...Yitzchak ztz"l, the Rav Av Beit Din of Karlin, author of and was very honored in his home, as a grandson of the told me, and from there his questions and hesitations were rushed to the...hagaon Shaul ztzll"l".Rabbi Yisrael of Salant wrote a letter to Hard"m Meisles, Av Beit Din of Krakow, in 1865 (printed in Moriah, Nissan 1999) that said, "on behalf of my childhood friend... the gaon..Maharas"h Rabbi of Shalvan..., perhaps you have the ability to share in the pain of this outstanding Torah scholar and to be a support for him."The Maharal Diskin also wrote a recommendation letter (also printed in the Moriah), "to complete the words of our friend, Harav HaGaon ...[Yisrael Salanter], because we have aroused together for HaRav..the Av Beit Din of Shavlan, who has seen poverty for six years because of libelous lies, and his judgment has not yet been published (that even this soon should come clean, with the compassion of Hashem)." The libels mentioned by the Maharil Diskin refer to the notorious blood libels that began in 1861 and only ended about six years later. Refer to Zichron Yaakov Lipshitz (section two p. 12). Apparently written by Rabbi Shmuel, Av Beit Din of Shavlan, childhood friend of Rabbi Yisrael Salanter, a close disciple of the author of. One of his questions was printed in siman 19. The author's grandson commented, "This is HaRav HaGaon Shmuel ztz"l who was later Av Beit Din in Shavlan, and then studied in Karlin and then spent time in the shadow of the Gaon...Yitzchak ztz"l, the Rav Av Beit Din of Karlin, author of and was very honored in his home, as a grandson of the told me, and from there his questions and hesitations were rushed to the...hagaon Shaul ztzll"l".Rabbi Yisrael of Salant wrote a letter to Hard"m Meisles, Av Beit Din of Krakow, in 1865 (printed in Moriah, Nissan 1999) that said, "on behalf of my childhood friend... the gaon..Maharas"h Rabbi of Shalvan..., perhaps you have the ability to share in the pain of this outstanding Torah scholar and to be a support for him."The Maharal Diskin also wrote a recommendation letter (also printed in the Moriah), "to complete the words of our friend, Harav HaGaon ...[Yisrael Salanter], because we have aroused together for HaRav..the Av Beit Din of Shavlan, who has seen poverty for six years because of libelous lies, and his judgment has not yet been published (that even this soon should come clean, with the compassion of Hashem)." The libels mentioned by the Maharil Diskin refer to the notorious blood libels that began in 1861 and only ended about six years later. Refer to Zichron Yaakov Lipshitz (section two p. 12). Apparently written by Rabbi Shmuel, Av Beit Din of Shavlan, childhood friend of Rabbi Yisrael Salanter, a close disciple of the author of. One of his questions was printed in siman 19. The author's grandson commented, "This is HaRav HaGaon Shmuel ztz"l who was later Av Beit Din in Shavlan, and then studied in Karlin and then spent time in the shadow of the Gaon...Yitzchak ztz"l, the Rav Av Beit Din of Karlin, author of and was very honored in his home, as a grandson of the told me, and from there his questions and hesitations were rushed to the...hagaon Shaul ztzll"l".Rabbi Yisrael of Salant wrote a letter to Hard"m Meisles, Av Beit Din of Krakow, in 1865 (printed in Moriah, Nissan 1999) that said, "on behalf of my childhood friend... the gaon..Maharas"h Rabbi of Shalvan..., perhaps you have the ability to share in the pain of this outstanding Torah scholar and to be a support for him."The Maharal Diskin also wrote a recommendation letter (also printed in the Moriah), "to complete the words of our friend, Harav HaGaon ...[Yisrael Salanter], because we have aroused together for HaRav..the Av Beit Din of Shavlan, who has seen poverty for six years because of libelous lies, and his judgment has not yet been published (that even this soon should come clean, with the compassion of Hashem)." The libels mentioned by the Maharil Diskin refer to the notorious blood libels that began in 1861 and only ended about six years later. Refer to Zichron Yaakov Lipshitz (section two p. 12). Apparently written by Rabbi Shmuel, Av Beit Din of Shavlan, childhood friend of Rabbi Yisrael Salanter, a close disciple of the author of. One of his questions was printed in siman 19. The author's grandson commented, "This is HaRav HaGaon Shmuel ztz"l who was later Av Beit Din in Shavlan, and then studied in Karlin and then spent time in the shadow of the Gaon...Yitzchak ztz"l, the Rav Av Beit Din of Karlin, author of and was very honored in his home, as a grandson of the told me, and from there his questions and hesitations were rushed to the...hagaon Shaul ztzll"l".Rabbi Yisrael of Salant wrote a letter to Hard"m Meisles, Av Beit Din of Krakow, in 1865 (printed in Moriah, Nissan 1999) that said, "on behalf of my childhood friend... the gaon..Maharas"h Rabbi of Shalvan..., perhaps you have the ability to share in the pain of this outstanding Torah scholar and to be a support for him."The Maharal Diskin also wrote a recommendation letter (also printed in the Moriah), "to complete the words of our friend, Harav HaGaon ...[Yisrael Salanter], because we have aroused together for HaRav..the Av Beit Din of Shavlan, who has seen poverty for six years because of libelous lies, and his judgment has not yet been published (that even this soon should come clean, with the compassion of Hashem)." The libels mentioned by the Maharil Diskin refer to the notorious blood libels that began in 1861 and only ended about six years later. Refer to Zichron Yaakov Lipshitz (section two p. 12). Apparently written by Rabbi Shmuel, Av Beit Din of Shavlan, childhood friend of Rabbi Yisrael Salanter, a close disciple of the author of. One of his questions was printed in siman 19. The author's grandson commented, "This is HaRav HaGaon Shmuel ztz"l who was later Av Beit Din in Shavlan, and then studied in Karlin and then spent time in the shadow of the Gaon...Yitzchak ztz"l, the Rav Av Beit Din of Karlin, author of and was very honored in his home, as a grandson of the told me, and from there his questions and hesitations were rushed to the...hagaon Shaul ztzll"l".Rabbi Yisrael of Salant wrote a letter to Hard"m Meisles, Av Beit Din of Krakow, in 1865 (printed in Moriah, Nissan 1999) that said, "on behalf of my childhood friend... the gaon..Maharas"h Rabbi of Shalvan..., perhaps you have the ability to share in the pain of this outstanding Torah scholar and to be a support for him."The Maharal Diskin also wrote a recommendation letter (also printed in the Moriah), "to complete the words of our friend, Harav HaGaon ...[Yisrael Salanter], because we have aroused together for HaRav..the Av Beit Din of Shavlan, who has seen poverty for six years because of libelous lies, and his judgment has not yet been published (that even this soon should come clean, with the compassion of Hashem)." The libels mentioned by the Maharil Diskin refer to the notorious blood libels that began in 1861 and only ended about six years later. Refer to Zichron Yaakov Lipshitz (section two p. 12). Apparently written by Rabbi Shmuel, Av Beit Din of Shavlan, childhood friend of Rabbi Yisrael Salanter, a close disciple of the author of. One of his questions was printed in siman 19. The author's grandson commented, "This is HaRav HaGaon Shmuel ztz"l who was later Av Beit Din in Shavlan, and then studied in Karlin and then spent time in the shadow of the Gaon...Yitzchak ztz"l, the Rav Av Beit Din of Karlin, author of and was very honored in his home, as a grandson of the told me, and from there his questions and hesitations were rushed to the...hagaon Shaul ztzll"l".Rabbi Yisrael of Salant wrote a letter to Hard"m Meisles, Av Beit Din of Krakow, in 1865 (printed in Moriah, Nissan 1999) that said, "on behalf of my childhood friend... the gaon..Maharas"h Rabbi of Shalvan..., perhaps you have the ability to share in the pain of this outstanding Torah scholar and to be a support for him."The Maharal Diskin also wrote a recommendation letter (also printed in the Moriah), "to complete the words of our friend, Harav HaGaon ...[Yisrael Salanter], because we have aroused together for HaRav..the Av Beit Din of Shavlan, who has seen poverty for six years because of libelous lies, and his judgment has not yet been published (that even this soon should come clean, with the compassion of Hashem)." The libels mentioned by the Maharil Diskin refer to the notorious blood libels that began in 1861 and only ended about six years later. Refer to Zichron Yaakov Lipshitz (section two p. 12). Apparently written by Rabbi Shmuel, Av Beit Din of Shavlan, childhood friend of Rabbi Yisrael Salanter, a close disciple of the author of. One of his questions was printed in siman 19. The author's grandson commented, "This is HaRav HaGaon Shmuel ztz"l who was later Av Beit Din in Shavlan, and then studied in Karlin and then spent time in the shadow of the Gaon...Yitzchak ztz"l, the Rav Av Beit Din of Karlin, author of and was very honored in his home, as a grandson of the told me, and from there his questions and hesitations were rushed to the...hagaon Shaul ztzll"l".Rabbi Yisrael of Salant wrote a letter to Hard"m Meisles, Av Beit Din of Krakow, in 1865 (printed in Moriah, Nissan 1999) that said, "on behalf of my childhood friend... the gaon..Maharas"h Rabbi of Shalvan..., perhaps you have the ability to share in the pain of this outstanding Torah scholar and to be a support for him."The Maharal Diskin also wrote a recommendation letter (also printed in the Moriah), "to complete the words of our friend, Harav HaGaon ...[Yisrael Salanter], because we have aroused together for HaRav..the Av Beit Din of Shavlan, who has seen poverty for six years because of libelous lies, and his judgment has not yet been published (that even this soon should come clean, with the compassion of Hashem)." The libels mentioned by the Maharil Diskin refer to the notorious blood libels that began in 1861 and only ended about six years later. Refer to Zichron Yaakov Lipshitz (section two p. 12). Each sermon is headed with the event and date on which it was delivered. Lengthy sermons for finishing solitary tractates, orders, and for a siyum for the six orders of the Mishna. The sermons are dated 1852-1859, 1865, 1871, 1877, 1878, 1883. A quick look is enough to verify that the author was a prominent person who had fantastic expertise in halacha and drush, the works of the Achronim, language and writing. His words of mussar were delivered with charm and modesty. His mussar is covered with pleasantness while integrating them with ideas appropriate for the time and words fortifying mussar and G-dly service and promoting Torah study amongst his congregation. Very fine. Aging stains. Magnificent, new leather binding.Read more

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Sefer HaTerumah. Halachic Rulings from [Rabbi Baruch son of Yitzchak].

[139] leaves, 24x19 cm. Haberman, HaMadpis Daniel Bombergi V'Reshimat Sifrei Defuso number 81.There are a number of handwritten glosses indicating different versions and source references iOn the book's title page: "Printed after extensive review, this magnificent book which is called ..." contains 254 clauses of the laws of: ritual slaughter, treifot, issur v'heter, challah, niddah, gittin, chalitza, avodah zara, yayin nesech, sefer Torah, Tefillin and Shabbat. The clauses, which are the titles of the laws, appear at the beginning of the book, followed by the rulings themselves.On the book's title page: "Printed after extensive review, this magnificent book which is called ..." contains 254 clauses of the laws of: ritual slaughter, treifot, issur v'heter, challah, niddah, gittin, chalitza, avodah zara, yayin nesech, sefer Torah, Tefillin and Shabbat. The clauses, which are the titles of the laws, appear at the beginning of the book, followed by the rulings themselves.Within the rulings are laws of the Land of Israel, which begin with the topic of love of the Land: "For the sake of Zion I will not be silent and for the sake of Jerusalem I will not be quiet until her righteousness shines like brilliance and a teacher of justice reaches her...because the Land of Israel is beloved and fortunate is the one who dwells in her... and even more so one who dwells in her and fulfills the commandments which depend on her, has the merit of being close to G-d."   The author [circa 1140 - 1211] one of the Tosefists, immigrated to Israel at the end of his life. The is considered to be one of the important books of halachic ruling, and many halachic adjudicators base their rulings on it. The author [circa 1140 - 1211] one of the Tosefists, immigrated to Israel at the end of his life. The is considered to be one of the important books of halachic ruling, and many halachic adjudicators base their rulings on it. The author [circa 1140 - 1211] one of the Tosefists, immigrated to Israel at the end of his life. The is considered to be one of the important books of halachic ruling, and many halachic adjudicators base their rulings on it. Fine. Pleasant margins, aging stains, worming holes in the white margins of the first leaves only. On leaf [2] and [7] are tears and pasting with slight damage to text. Semi leather binding, ancient with slight blemishes.  Read more

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Rare "Semicha" from the Maharsham of Berezhany, given to Rabbi Shalom

[1] doubled leaf. 26x21 cm. The semicha was written, signed and stamped by the Maharsham. It was given after Rabbi Shalom Moskowitz lived in his house for nine months to learn practical halacha. The Maharsham extols Rabbi Shalom's approach to halacha extensively, and he taught him things that he did not wish to publicize in writing. He gave Rabbi Shalom semicha to be a rabbi-posek when he was only 24 years old. He writes: "He is worthy of being accepted as rabbi in every place reached by the words of the King of the world, his rulings are to be relied upon like every outstanding rabbi's." Despite their great difference in age, Rabbi Shalom Moskowitz is often considered the leading disciple of the Maharsham.  Rabbi Shalom Mordechai HaKohen Schwardron, the Maharsham of Berezhany (1835-1911) was a prominent Galician rabbi and posek of his time. He had close relationships with leading Admors, and the Admors of Belz considered him the primary posek. Many questions were sent to him from around the world, and his questioners included the Chofetz Chaim. His printed works include the which includes thousands of halachic responses, his large halachic treatises  and many other works. Rabbi Shalom Mordechai HaKohen Schwardron, the Maharsham of Berezhany (1835-1911) was a prominent Galician rabbi and posek of his time. He had close relationships with leading Admors, and the Admors of Belz considered him the primary posek. Many questions were sent to him from around the world, and his questioners included the Chofetz Chaim. His printed works include the which includes thousands of halachic responses, his large halachic treatises  and many other works. Rabbi Shalom Mordechai HaKohen Schwardron, the Maharsham of Berezhany (1835-1911) was a prominent Galician rabbi and posek of his time. He had close relationships with leading Admors, and the Admors of Belz considered him the primary posek. Many questions were sent to him from around the world, and his questioners included the Chofetz Chaim. His printed works include the which includes thousands of halachic responses, his large halachic treatises  and many other works.Rabbi Shalom Moskowitz of Shatz [1877-1958] was born in Shatz, Romania. He was a scion of the Maggid of Zolotchov. He was proficient in kabbala and halacha and authored halachic works. In his youth, he received semicha from the Maharsham who praised him extensively. In 1929, he moved to London where he was known as the "Admor of Shatz" and was a reputed wonder-worker. In his will, he promised to arouse Divine pity for anybody who prayed at his grave and took upon himself to fortify his mitzvah observance and light candles. His grave became a pilgrimage site, primarily on Fridays. Some of his Torah thoughts were printed in the series. Refer to: 3, 661-662.Rabbi Shalom Moskowitz of Shatz [1877-1958] was born in Shatz, Romania. He was a scion of the Maggid of Zolotchov. He was proficient in kabbala and halacha and authored halachic works. In his youth, he received semicha from the Maharsham who praised him extensively. In 1929, he moved to London where he was known as the "Admor of Shatz" and was a reputed wonder-worker. In his will, he promised to arouse Divine pity for anybody who prayed at his grave and took upon himself to fortify his mitzvah observance and light candles. His grave became a pilgrimage site, primarily on Fridays. Some of his Torah thoughts were printed in the series. Refer to: 3, 661-662.Rabbi Shalom Moskowitz of Shatz [1877-1958] was born in Shatz, Romania. He was a scion of the Maggid of Zolotchov. He was proficient in kabbala and halacha and authored halachic works. In his youth, he received semicha from the Maharsham who praised him extensively. In 1929, he moved to London where he was known as the "Admor of Shatz" and was a reputed wonder-worker. In his will, he promised to arouse Divine pity for anybody who prayed at his grave and took upon himself to fortify his mitzvah observance and light candles. His grave became a pilgrimage site, primarily on Fridays. Some of his Torah thoughts were printed in the series. Refer to: 3, 661-662. Light tears in the folds, lightly affecting text. Fine condition.Read more

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The Estate Ledgers of the Beit Din in Fez, Written and Signed by the

 Size of the ledger - 19x30 cm. 200 pages, of which 61 leaves are inscribed. A special ledger in which the Beit Din recorded the wills drawn up and authorized by them, a list of the estates and the manner of their division among the heirs. All written and signed by the rabbis and dayans of Fez and confirmed in their handwriting, with governmental tax stamps Rabbi Vidal Serfaty, Rabbi of Fez, wrote in his handwriting at the beginning of the ledger: "The estate ledger was opened for writing on the third of Av 5680 [July 18, 1920] in Fez, HaTzvi Vidal Serfaty S.T." With his stamp in French.Among the rabbis who wrote and signed: the above Rabbi Vidal Serfaty, Rabbi Moshe ibn Danan, the Av Beit Din Rabbi Matityahu Sirusi, Rabbi Abba Attiah, Rabbi Yosef HaCohen Skali, Rabbi Yosef ben Naim author of , Rabbi Shlomo Sasson, Rabbi Shmuel ibn Danan, Rabbi Yaakov ibn Danan, Rabbi Yehuda ibn Atar.Among the rabbis who wrote and signed: the above Rabbi Vidal Serfaty, Rabbi Moshe ibn Danan, the Av Beit Din Rabbi Matityahu Sirusi, Rabbi Abba Attiah, Rabbi Yosef HaCohen Skali, Rabbi Yosef ben Naim author of , Rabbi Shlomo Sasson, Rabbi Shmuel ibn Danan, Rabbi Yaakov ibn Danan, Rabbi Yehuda ibn Atar. For biographical information on the above Rabbis, refer to by Rabbi Yosef ben Naim Paris 2010 pages 601-611. For biographical information on the above Rabbis, refer to by Rabbi Yosef ben Naim Paris 2010 pages 601-611. For biographical information on the above Rabbis, refer to by Rabbi Yosef ben Naim Paris 2010 pages 601-611. Fine-very fine. Original scuffed binding.   Read more

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Halachic response. Autograph of the "Shoel U'Meishiv"

[1] doubled leaf, 21x17 cm. The response was written and signed by the author of . It was written to Rabbi Yaakov Shlomo, Av Beit Din of Premishlan, and its content includes a section of a question from , second edition. The response appears on one page, and the second page bears the address of the sender, a stamp and traces of a red wax stamp. [1] doubled leaf, 21x17 cm. The response was written and signed by the author of . It was written to Rabbi Yaakov Shlomo, Av Beit Din of Premishlan, and its content includes a section of a question from , second edition. The response appears on one page, and the second page bears the address of the sender, a stamp and traces of a red wax stamp. [1] doubled leaf, 21x17 cm. The response was written and signed by the author of . It was written to Rabbi Yaakov Shlomo, Av Beit Din of Premishlan, and its content includes a section of a question from , second edition. The response appears on one page, and the second page bears the address of the sender, a stamp and traces of a red wax stamp. Response regarding selling chametz and renting the location with the chametz to a non-Jew, accomplished without witnesses and without the seller writing his name in the contract. The great gaon, Rabbi Yosef Shaul HaLevi Notenhausen, author of  (1808-1875) was the rabbi of Lemberg for about twenty years. He was a master of Torah and one of the leading halachic responders of his time. He received questions from all corners of the world. He was asked to provide many approbations and rabbinic semicha. He was known to be "holy from the womb" and was admired by the Torah leaders of his generation - including the Chatam Sofer - from a very young age. When Rabbi Chaim of Sanz addressed a question to him regarding mikvaot, he used many honorifics ( second edition, section 1, siman 24). The great gaon, Rabbi Yosef Shaul HaLevi Notenhausen, author of  (1808-1875) was the rabbi of Lemberg for about twenty years. He was a master of Torah and one of the leading halachic responders of his time. He received questions from all corners of the world. He was asked to provide many approbations and rabbinic semicha. He was known to be "holy from the womb" and was admired by the Torah leaders of his generation - including the Chatam Sofer - from a very young age. When Rabbi Chaim of Sanz addressed a question to him regarding mikvaot, he used many honorifics ( second edition, section 1, siman 24). The great gaon, Rabbi Yosef Shaul HaLevi Notenhausen, author of  (1808-1875) was the rabbi of Lemberg for about twenty years. He was a master of Torah and one of the leading halachic responders of his time. He received questions from all corners of the world. He was asked to provide many approbations and rabbinic semicha. He was known to be "holy from the womb" and was admired by the Torah leaders of his generation - including the Chatam Sofer - from a very young age. When Rabbi Chaim of Sanz addressed a question to him regarding mikvaot, he used many honorifics ( second edition, section 1, siman 24). Moderate-fine. Fold marks. Aging stains. The ink has faded but is legible. Light tears without loss of text.Read more

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