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Small Pottery : Minature Acoma Pottery Canteen #220

Small Pottery Description: 1970s 80s black on orange geometric design has minor rubbing and pitting 4.5"X4.5"x4" Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clays gathered from each pueblo‰۪s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated most frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqu̩. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo' pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.‰۝ (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona)Read more

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Antique Pottery : Historic Red Pottery Pot with Lid from the Ayutthaya

Antique Pottery 421. A historic red terracotta pottery pot with a lid, acquired from the locals at the Ayutthaya Ruins just outsider of Bangkok, Thailand. Purchased some 50 years ago. There are striations on the outside of the piece probably caused by the pottery making paddle. It is a rough piece but overall it is in good condition for its reported age. Ayutthaya (full name Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya; also spelled "Ayudhya") city is the capital of Ayutthaya province in Thailand. Located in the valley of the Chao Phraya River, the city was founded in 1350 by King U Thong, who went there to escape a smallpox outbreak in Lop Buri and proclaimed it the capital of his kingdom, often referred to as the Ayutthaya kingdom or Siam. Ayutthaya became the second Siamese capital after Sukhothai.[1] It is estimated that Ayutthaya by the year 1600 CE had a population of about 300,000, with the population perhaps reaching 1,000,000 around 1700 CE, making it one of the world's largest cities at that time,[2] when it was sometimes known as the "Venice of the East".[3][4] In 1767, the city was destroyed by the Burmese army, resulting in the collapse of the kingdom. The ruins of the old city are preserved in the Ayutthaya historical park,[5] which is recognized internationally as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The ruins, characterized by the prang (reliquary towers) and gigantic monasteries, give an idea of the city's past splendour.[6] Modern Ayutthaya was refounded a few kilometers to the east.Read more

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Native American, Diegueno Historic San Diego Pottery Bowl, #1031 Sold

Native American, Diegueno Historic San Diego Pottery Bowl, 1031 Description: Native American, Diegueno Historic San Diego Pottery Bowl, Dimensions: 6 1/2 x 3 inches Provenance: From Jacumba, California. Found on private land. Condition: Condition: It has a nice, old repair, and small piece is missing above the repair. Some back ground on the Diegueno Indians and Pottery Making; Location: Extreme southern California, crossing the border to Mexico (San Diego County & western part of Imperial County) Language: Hokan family Population: 1770 estimate: 3,000 1910 Census: 800 The two dialects of the Diegueño separated them into northern and southern groups, the northern Ipai (e pi) and the southern Tipai (te pi). The Diegueño are also known as the Kumeyaay. SETTLEMENTS Diegueño settlements spread across southern California and northern Baja California (now Mexico). Diegueños lived on the coast, in the mountains, and in the desert. Some Diegueño bands moved around a lot as the seasons changed. There are signs that some groups had several campsites that they occupied at different times of the year. There may have been very few permanent villages. Diegueño comes from the name of the first Spanish mission in California, San Diego. The more precise names of Ipai and Tipai are words from the native languages meaning people. The people themselves did not use any name to refer to the more than 30 clans that spoke the Ipai-Tipai dialects. They called themselves instead by the place where their clan lived. Each small group or band had a clan leader who inherited his position from his father. The leader was supposed to know more about the customs and history of his people, and so be able to direct their ceremonies and advise them on clan matters. HOUSES How the houses were built depended on the location and how long they were going to be used. In the summer village, only shade and a windbreak were needed. A row of trees or a cave would provide this, or a one-sided, roofed shelter made of poles and brush. Where a more substantial house was needed, a dome-shaped building was constructed. Poles arranged in a circle were bent in to meet in the middle. The frame was covered with brush. This was sometimes covered with thatch made of tule reeds and with earth. Inside, the floor was dug out slightly below ground level. Attached to the house was a single wall used as a windbreak for an outside working area. Diegueños living in the desert might use palm branches as thatch on their shelters. In the mountains, slabs of bark could be used for the walls. Each family was responsible for its own shelter, and for rebuilding it when the group moved. Everyone worked together to build a ceremonial structure, which was usually a brush fence enclosing a round dance area. Villages also had sweat houses, smaller than the dwellings, used by the men who gathered in the evening to cleanse themselves. FOOD For most of the Diegueño, acorns were the main food. Some of the southern Tipai groups depended more on pods from the mesquite bush, which they pounded into flour in much the same way that the others pounded acorns into flour. Seeds of the sage, flax, and buckwheat plants were also ground into flour, and used to make mush and flat cakes. In the spring, the women and girls gathered fresh greens such as watercress, clover, yucca stalks and roots, and the blossoms and buds of roses and several kinds of cactus. In some areas they found berries on manzanita and elderberry bushes, wild plums and cherries. Wild onion was used as a seasoning. The agave plant, which provided fibers from which sandals were made, was also used as food. The Tipai who lived in the Imperial Valley were one of the few early California groups to plant some crops. They learned from people living to the east of them how to grow corn, beans, and melons. Even those who did some farming, however, still got most of their food by gathering wild plants. Deer were scarce in Diegueño territory. Men who knew how to hunt deer were respected. It was an honor for a boy to be chosen to learn to be a hunter of big game like deer. Most of the meat used by the Diegueño came from small animals like rabbits, woodrats, and lizards. They also ate some snakes and insects, as well as birds such as geese, quail, and doves. Only those groups who lived near the ocean had fish in their diet, for there were not many rivers in Diegueño areas. For people who lived near San Diego Bay, fish and mollusks were main foods. CLOTHING Very little clothing was necessary in the southern California climate. Children and men usually wore no clothes. Men used a belt around their waist on which they could fasten things they needed to carry. Women wore an apron-like skirt, sometimes with just one piece in front, sometimes with a second piece in the back. Since women carried things in a net bag that hung from a strap around the forehead, they often wore a round woven cap to protect their heads from the strap. When they needed to walk through thorny areas, both men and women wore sandals made from agave fibers. When the weather was cold, they put blankets or robes over their shoulders. The robes were made of rabbitskin or deerskin, or of willow bark pounded until it was soft. TOOLS Both baskets and pottery were used by the Diegueño for storing and cooking food. The pottery containers were made from a red clay mixed with crushed rock. The clay was rolled into long ropes, coiled into the desired shape, and fired in a hot oven. Fibers of the milkweed and yucca plants were used to make string and cord. The cord was then knotted to make nets and carrying bags. Nets were used by the hunters to catch small animals and birds. They also used curved throwing sticks and bows and arrows to catch game. Both nets and hooks were used by the coastal groups for catching fish. They had light rafts made from bundles of tule reeds bound together with cord, which allowed them to go out on the bay to fish. TRADE The many groups of Ipai and Tipai often traded with each other for items that were found in each other's territory. Those on the coast traded dried seafood, salt, and abalone shells to those who lived in the hills and desert regions. From them they got acorns, agave, mesquite beans, and gourds. Groups living in the Imperial Valley traded food to the mountain groups in exchange for granite, steatite (or soapstone), and red and black minerals used to make paint. Anyone who owned an eagle could trade its feathers, which were considered of great value. Major trails crossed southern California, going from the Colorado River to the Pacific Ocean. Because of this, the Diegueño had contact with groups living further east, and with early explorers of the southwest. Trade with these groups, though not frequent, influenced the Diegueño culture. CEREMONIES A special area for dances was made by using brush to make a circular fence around a section of level ground. Eagles were often used in ceremonies. A village leader might own an eagle's nest and raise eaglets. An important ceremony was the keruk, held in the fall to honor those who had died during the past year. The dancing lasted four to eight days. Dolls made to look as lifelike as possible were used to represent those who had died. When a leader died, a special Eagle Dance was held. Gourd or deer-hoof rattles were used to keep rhythm for the dancing. Source: factcards.califa.org/cai/Diegueno.html. A History of Pueblo Pottery: Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo's local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated most frequently with paint and occasionally with applique. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo's pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and poly chrome a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce un-decorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art. (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona) ---------------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavRead more

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Native American Indian Hopi Pottery, by Dee Setalla #1069

Native American Indian Hopi Pottery Jar signed Dee Setalla. #1069 Description: Native American Indian Hopi Pottery Jar signed Dee Setalla. The decorated bowl is signed Dee Setalla Hopi, K.C. Az. Conditon: In good condition. Dimensions: Measures 5 inches high by 9.5 inches diameter. Some background data on the artist: "Dee Johnson Setalla. is a member of the Hopi Tribe. he was born and raised in Snowbird Canyon, Arizona. Since he is part of the Bear Clan (Mother - Bear Clan) he signs his pottery with a Bear Claw. Dee started making pottery around the age of 6 years old. Most of his teachings came from great potters such as his mother Pauline Setalla, and Aunt Eunice "Fawn" Navasie, who was a well known Hopi potter. He does traditional designs such as birds, moths or butterflies, bear claws, clouds and rain (Father - Water Clan) designs. His pottery is known for its thin walls and high polish. The gray clay that he molds his pottery with is dug up on the Hopi reservation. Once the clay is prepared it is hand coiled. Coiling is the ancient way that Hopi's still make pottery. Paint for the pottery comes from local plants which are picked by the handfuls in the spring then boiled in a large tub of water until they condense into a black substance. Pottery is painted with a paint brush which comes from a yucca stem. The ends are chewed and trimmed to various sizes. The designs are painted freehand. The pottery is eventually transferred outdoors to be fired with sheep dung. his art is the contribution of a thousand years of Hopi art and cultural expression. When working with the clay, he says "it is like you're bringing it to life. You must treat it with respect. You treat it like you are raising a child, and guide it through the growing stages. It's not just steps out of tradition, but a personal nurturing as well. You must be very grateful for the clay and pottery. I pray each morning with cornmeal. When we dig clay, we leave food there. You can't be greedy and not leave anything". Pottery in the younger Hopi generations is slowly fading out. Dee would like to devote his time to teaching this generation the art of pottery, and what it means to me. Being a mentor would play an important role for him. Dee has shown and won ribbons at various venues including: August 1997 - Santa Fe Indian Market: 1st Place -Traditional Hopi Pottery Jar; February 1998 - Scottsdale Community College Rez Art Show: Merit Award - Seed Pot; Museum of Northern Arizona Hopi Show: 3rd Place - Large Hopi Jar, Honorable Mention - Medium Seed Pot." (Source: Ancient Nations). A History of Pueblo Pottery: “Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo’s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated—most frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqué. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo’s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome—a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.” (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona)Read more

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Native American Harrison Begay, Navajo (1914-2012), Ca. 1960's, #927 Sold

Native American Harrison Begay, Navajo (1914-2012) Ca 1960's 927. Description: Native American Harrison Begay, Navajo (1914-2012), Ca. 1960s, Beautiful vintage silkscreen showing two doe and three birds. Dimensions: Site 10 3/4" x 8 3/4, (17-1/2" x 15-1/4" framed) Condition: Excellent condition given its age. The Artist:Harrison Begay (Haashké yah Níyá, "Warrior Who Walked Up to His Enemy") (November 15, 1917 – August 18, 2012)[1] was a renowned Navajo painter, perhaps the most famous of his generation.[2] Begay specialized in watercolors and silkscreen prints. He was the last living former student of Dorothy Dunn at the Santa Fe Indian School. His work won multiple awards and is exhibited in museums and private collections worldwide. Biography: Harrison Begay was born in White Cone, Arizona on 15 November 1917, although his birth year has also been record as 1914,[3] at White Cone, near Greasewood, Arizona in the Navajo Nation, to Black Rock and Zonnie Tachinie Begay. His mother belonged to the Zuni White Corn Clan, and his father was Walk Around Clan / Near Water Clan.[3] Young Harrison herded his family's flock of sheep near Greasewood, where he lived most of his life.[2] In 1933, he entered the Santa Fe Indian School to study art under Dorothy Dunn in her new Studio School. His classmates included Gerald Nailor, Quincy Tahoma, Geronima Montoya and Andrew Tsihnahjinnie.[2] Begay learned Dunn's characteristic "Studio Style" or "flat-style painting"; in her book American Indian Painting of the Southwest and Plains Areas, Dunn described Begay's work as "at once decorative and lifelike, his color clear in hue and even in value, his figures placid yet inwardly animated.... [H]e seemed to be inexhaustibly resourceful in a quiet reticent way." [2] In 1940, Begay attended Black Mountain College in North Carolina, to study architecture for one year. In 1941, he enrolled in Phoenix College in Arizona. From 1942 to 1945, Begay served in the US Army Signal Corps.[2] Artistic career and awards :Begay returned to the Navajo reservation in 1947 and made his living as a painter ever since. Begay continued to paint in the flat, "Studio style" throughout his long career – he was still painting (in acrylics) in 2004, at age 90.[4] His work has been included in a vast number of public and private collections of Native American art, including the Museum of the American Indian, the Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Northern Arizona, the Heard Museum, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, the Wheelwright Museum, the Southwest Museum, the Philbrook Museum, the Gilcrease Museum, and many more.[2][5][6][7] Begay won two grand awards at the Gallup Intertribal Ceremonial[8] and has been a consistent winner at state and tribal fairs. In 1954, he was awarded the French Ordre des Palmes Académiques.[2] In 1995, he was awarded the Native American Masters Award by the Heard Museum. In 2003, he won the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts, the organizers of the annual Santa Fe Indian Market.[7] Begay painted scenes from traditional Navajo life, showing the beauty of a "timeless, peaceful and gentle world".[5] "Although his prodigious output included facile minor works tending towards sentimentality, his major work is characterized by inventiveness, originality, refinement and delicacy." His most familiar subjects are Navajo people in ceremonial and daily life, horses and riders, and deer.[5] Begay's work was featured in publications such as Enduring Tradition: Art of the Navajos, by Lois and Jerry Jacka; Southwest Indian Painting, by Clara Lee Tanner; and When the Rainbow Touches Down, by Tryntje Van Ness Seymour. Begay was named a "Living Legend" in 1990 by Indian Art Harrison Begay biography from Encyclopedia of World Biography 1. Begay interview, 2002. 2. Harrison Begay at Indigenous Research Center 3. Harrison Begay in the Grove Dictionary of Art 4. Harrison Begay search at ZoomInfo 5. Biography at Medicine Man Gallery 6. Gallup Intertribal. Source: Wikipedia View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavDescription:Read more

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Bronze Sculpture, "Highway to Home" Limited Edition of 75, by James

Western Decor 899. Description: Bronze Sculpture, "Highway to Home" Limited Edition of 75, by James Regimbal, made to order. Two hunters packed up heading home with a successful hunt. The panners on the pack horses are full of game diamond hitches, half hitches and all. Some pack horses are tailed' ,all so with important accouterments tied to the packs, everything needed to stay in the wilds hunting big game. Remember family's depended on successful hunts to get them through the long winters. Being on a trail they probably know well, these hunters are heading, the trail being their " Dimensions: 5' long X 12'' high X 6 '' deep All orders require 1/3 down. Deposits are not refundable once the order is placed. When the bronze sculpture is cast and ready for shipping, the balance is due before the bronze is shipped. Once ordered, twelve to fifteen weeks is standard for art foundry's, and sometimes it could take two to three weeks longer if foundry's get behind on work loads. Special colored patinas are offered to collectors if requested before hand. All bronzes come with a studio certificate of authenticity, signed by the artist. Artist: James Regimbal strives to pass on the true story of our American heritage through his bronze sculpture. According to James: "Only the best of my work is good enough to be cast in bronze. Work that has been fully designed and completely executed should have this liberty. It's not the cost of bronze itself, though very expensive to have cast, but the everlasting life and beauty of bronze. Knowing that in years to come these sculptures will still be in existence and appreciated, passing on a true story of our heritage. The demand we put on creating excellence today is to show our selves and future generations. The work that has been completed in this life long collection is a culmination of decades of genuine American creativity, craftsmanship ,labor and talent. Like in the past, as in European country's the artist and craftsmen would work without seeming end. Time wasn't of the essence, but quality, accuracy and demand for excellence was always present in those days. The quality the old masters achieved with limited tools, compared today, is astounding, but the quality in this contemporary historical western collection is of the same. Perfection from me as the artist is the first step, the pride of workmanship from over fifty artisans, men and women laboring on these bronze limited editions. The foundry men sacrificed to bring out the best in their foundry's, not to forget the agents, dealers and gallery's demanding the best works from the artist and foundry's. The important people keeping the art going are the collectors in the world, the patrons of the arts who purchase and support the work, displaying it in their homes and keeping our historical culture alive. These are some of the most important ingredients in helping an artist continue to strive for the best works he or she possibly can create Hopefully my work will stand the test of time, and the realistic nature of the work will tell and keep alive a part of our romantic American history for generations to come." Regimbal creates very detailed, historically accurate bronzes. Taking his inspiration from true to life western books and western movies. Regimbal has detailed all aspects of the cowboy's life from the pre-1900. Subjects such as packers, Indians, warriors, hunters, story tellers, cavalrymen and bronco busters have all been accurately portrayed down to the minutest details by this talented sculptor. Regimbal researches every detail - buckles, pack items, saddles - all in an attempt to bring to life each scene in history as if the viewer were actually there. Regimbal's demand for excellence has resulted in hundreds of national and international collectors including the University of Montana Foundation, which has the complete collection of his works, and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. The artist has received the George Phippen Award, and Southern Nevada Communications uses his bronzes for logos in their advertisements. It is Regimbal's desire that his sculptures will stand the test of time and keep alive a part of our romantic American history for many generations to come. (Source: May Gallery) Creating the James Regimbal Bronze: I asked James, what goes into making one of his bronze sculptures. He replied as follows: "It's bronze, silver and gold their finding at the bottom of the ocean, most all other metals corrode away in salt water. Bronze and the lost wax process hasn't changed much over the ages, the principles are the same, bronze is still the artist choice. With time and effort, artists finish their work. Master molds are made of the original sculpture. Complicated subjects could be made up of dozens of molds. Today most molds are made out of a RTV or silicone rubber, instead of plaster. Once the molds are made there ready for the lost wax process." "The molds are filled with hot wax and poured out several times to build up a hallow layer of wax in each mold, some molds are poured with solid wax, "small pieces''. When the wax is cooled enough the mold is removed and the wax sculpture appears. The wax will have vents and sprews attached added for molten metal to flow through. The wax sculpture will then be dipped in the investment material made up of a high temperature plaster type silica sand mix, it holds up under white hot temperatures, many layers are coated and built up around the wax sculpture. When cured the piece with the investment around it is put into a high temperature oven, heated white hot and the wax is melted or burnt out," the lost wax". With the wax gone the inverted impression is left in the investment. " "James Regimbal bronzes are made out of Evedure virgin bronze, finer unused metal. The bronze ingets are melted at 1800 to 2000 degrees and poured into each investment, When cooled the investment is broken away. The bronze pieces of the sculpture are now cleaned up, sprews and vents removed, much metal chasing, grinding and cutting is done before the final assemblage, some Regimbal sculptures have over forty five castings making them up. To complete the sculpture, all pieces are welded together, silver soldering is also used. All welds are ground and sculpted to match the artist original textures. The bronze is then sand blasted or glass beaded, its now ready for the color or patina. The patina is a acid, chemically induced on to the surface with torched heat to penetrate the surface of the bronze. Colors are up to the artist. After patina, the bronze is lacquered or hot wax is melted on to the surface, closing up the pours of the bronze. It is then put on its base and is ready to enter gallery's and homes of the collectors of the world." -------- Expanded Biography of James P Regimbal by N. D. Wolf James P. Regimbal was born on June 8, 1949 in Yakima Washington. From early on the powers that were needed, seemed to lend a hand in shaping this artist’s destiny. "Ghost riders in the sky” was the #1 hit at the time and the haunting western song would set the theme of the future works that would become his legacy. Even at a very young age many would take notice of his unusual talent at art. As a small child in catholic school, first grade, he was often encouraged to stay in at recess to fill the chalkboards with his incredible drawings. The nuns would watch in rapt amazement as the little boy, standing on a stool, rendered likeness' of themselves, the priests and other children in colored chalk. In junior high his art teacher and local art activist Blanch Cook, was so impressed with his talent, she saw to it personally that he be allowed two art classes in high school instead of one, paying for the extra supplies out of her own pocket. The principle of the high agreed that this kid was indeed special. In college he continued to excel in art and his works were often used as examples for others. After college James' future seemed uncertain as the Vietnam War was looming overhead like a black cloud and he was classified 1A for the draft. Fate was certainly on his side with a draft lottery drawing, with an incredible stroke of luck he escaped being sent off to war, now to be able to pursue his destiny as a sculptor. Coming from a ranching family this was not considered a serious vocation, however, his siblings were of the mind that his sculpting was merely more then, ''playing with putty''. His confidence and determination unshaken he left Yakima with $34.00 in his pocket and a dream. For the next six years he rode the freight trains up and down the west coast, making and selling his sculptures whenever and wherever he could. Most of these early works were created out of poly-form clay using only his hands and a toothpick He would cook them in a camp stove oven, most were then painted. Most of these sculptures were 4 1/2 to 7'' high and depicted cowboys and Indians sitting on blankets. He sold countless numbers of these and gave many away as mementos to female admirer's he met along the way. His only traveling companion being "Champ'' the loyal, protective German Shepherd he adopted at a local pound, for ten dollars in Laguna beach California. Although preferring to not settle in any one place for very long before hoping on another freight train, James would occasionally rent a garage for a while at $20.00 a month in order to set up a temporary studio. It was in such a garage in San Diego that he began making full size sculptures of Indians, cowboys, soldiers and many more different subjects, making them all out of fabric and boat resin. These were displayed outside of ''Ben Guns gun shop'' on a busy street corner and rapidly gained national media attention, especially the ones of Nixon and Kissinger, and made James a local celebrity. Not content to rest on his laurels and his garage studio, James and Champ made their way back to Laguna Beach. He began producing plaster castings of his western sculptures that were being sold to suppliers to ''Diamonds of Arizona''. He quickly tired of the “plasters” living with them in a garage and moved on to create more of his original clay sculptures. He settled in San Juan Capistrano in 1975-76 where an Indian shop let him and Champ sleep in the floor, while he worked, making more clay sculptures at night and selling them in the shop and out on the sidewalks during the day. He was successful enough to then buy a truck and camper and set off to Montana and Wyoming where he continued to sell his sculptures on sidewalks and rest stops. Sometimes western shops would let him set up a table to demonstrate and sell his work to the public. James and Camp would later move to California and set up a garage studio in Santa Ana. There he created works that would be sold by shops in San Juan Capistrano including ''Southwestern Antique and Gallery", that was owned by his old friend Norm Moldenhower. It was there Jim met artist Ace Powell who was doing a show at the gallery. Ace really liked James' work and had him create pieces for him. They were bought and shipped through the gallery to Montana, ''Ace Powell airport.'' Knowing James situation, Ace told him not to give up. In 1977 James would get his big break when he met bronze art agent Lou Kaplan who was doing business with Norm Moldenhower’s Gallery. Still living in a garage in Santa Ana, his first piece "Smoothing The Rough Edges'' was created and cast in bronze by ''The Age Of Bronze''. All 50 of the limited editions sold out in one year and James was well on his way to making a good living. The successful union between James and his agent would span 30 years and resulted in James work being featured in many prestigious gallery's, 8 gold metals and the pride of knowing his work was in the homes of some of the most influential and powerful people of the time, his work will be would be passed down for generation to come. James finally settled down in 1982 where he got married, raised a family of three children and is still producing fine art today. N. D. Wolf-10-19-16 You can find more of James’ work athttps://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16131018Read more

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Native American, Chemehuevi Tray, Ca 1920-30, #1028

1027: Description: Native American, Chemehuevi Tray, Ca 1920-30, Provenance: and came from Margaret Taylor Estate: Margaret Taylor was a teacher for many years near the Hopi and Navajo reservations around Flagstaff, Arizona. She greatly enjoyed meeting weavers and purchasing their wares, thereby helping support their families. A collector for decades, she filled her home with baskets, rugs and other items, adorning it throughout with items on display from her collection. Items offered in this auction – mostly contemporary and post-World War II works – include Navajo and Hopi basketry, rugs, jewelry and pottery. This collection showcases the width and breadth of recent Hopi and Navajo art, stretching its design vocabulary, and reinforcing that this is not a dying art, but one that is vibrant and alive. Dimensions: 11.5 inches diameter, 2.5 inches high. Condition: Very good for age. Has small nail hole in the bottom, and a light spot of dirt along the side. Some back ground on the Chemehuevi Indians THE CHEMEHUEVI INDIAN TRIBE: Nüw (The People) were very civilized, not prone to human or animal sacrifice. All things, particularly those in nature, were revered as gifts from the Creator, the Ocean Woman. All Her creatures and even inanimate objects were endowed with supernatural powers, particularly the Animals (The First People). Mouse and Wood rat, for example, were able to extract diseases from a person. There were three ages of Nüw civilization though some non-Indian “experts” say there were two. When the Earth Was Covered with Water speaks of Creation, When the Animals Were People was the time of myth and magic, and When Wolf & Coyote Went Away began the age of man. In story-telling, a winter pastime, one always precedes his story with the appropriate phrase. After Wolf & Coyote Went Away, man was on his own. The Creator’s two helpers left us with everything we needed to survive and rose to the sky to become the rainbow. Their colorful capes drape the earth after a rain. Religion was in no way ritualistic but more a personal and individual relationship between a person and the Creator. The gods are called Huivarum Karur, which means “those who sit here” and, when said, the space beside one is always indicated. It was not until modern times that Chemehuevi accepted the Christian notion that the Creator was male and became known as a “he”. Prayers were said only to the Ocean Woman in times of trouble. When a child lost its first baby tooth, the tooth was thrown away with a prayer to Her that she replace it with a bigger and better one. Prayers to the departed (Spirits) were necessary to protect the living, especially children. Religion and daily living were one and the same, so no aspect of life was dichotomized. Our nomadic forebears traveled in family groups and very often settled near relatives and became a virtual village. Chieftainancy was inherited, handed down from father to the eldest son, and these Clan Chiefs were outranked by the High Chiefs, who were revered almost as much as the shamans. Black- eyed beans were said to be the food of the High Chiefs as its properties gave them wisdom and courage. Male and female children were treated the same. All learned to make weapons and tools, and hunt and prepare food because survival skills were paramount. As they neared puberty, they would begin to learn the differences between men and women, which, to the old ones, were few. The roles of men and women were never defined or delineated because both had to do the same kind of work at some point. While parents were initially responsible for them, it was incumbent on sundry aunts and uncles to keep children in check; “it takes a village” certainly applied then. The sense of right and wrong began at an early age and usually came from stories (fables, if you will). Bad behavior invited unbearable gossip and public ridicule. The most extreme punishments were banishment or death. Death was perhaps the more preferred because a banished person could never return or claim to be of the people who had driven him away. As in a death, his name could never be spoken again. He finished out his days as a non- person. Harmony and respect were the way. A person with negative traits such as anger, meanness of spirit, jealousy and laziness was considered a liability. Having a good sense of humor was very important to Nüw. While much of the culture is lost, a few remember the stories and language of their forebears. The Chemehuevi Tribe offers classes in Nüwü Ampagap (the People’s Language). Nüw being a Southern Paiute, our language very closely resembles that spoken by the Moapa Paiutes. It is classified as Uto-Aztecan, and more precisely Numic. Interesting “tidbits” When a female infant’s umbilical cord falls off, it is put in Packrat’s nest so that she will be a good gatherer. A male infant’s is buried along a Deer trail so that he will be a good hunter. It is customary to offer the first bite to the Spirits when you eat outdoors because you are in their domain. Nüw did not eat anything from the water because it was thought unclean. It is likely that this goes back to the Creator. When the Animals Were People, they gathered to discuss civilization. When it was time to decide how many seasons there should be, only Owl answered by raising a foot, so the number of seasons is four. Material Culture, Technology The material culture developed by the Chemehuevi is very much like that of their neighbors, the Mojave, Serrano, and Cahuilla. As is usually the case, apparent differences are in part due to the types of material that were available and in part to their preferences. The Chemehuevi women were skilled basket makers, but made little pottery. Their coiled baskets resembled those of the San Joaquin Valley rather than those of southern California, often having constricted necks. Caps, triangular trays, and carrying baskets were diagonally twined. They usually painted designs on the baskets, rather than weaving them into the basket. Their coiled baskets were very distinctive because they were produced almost exclusively with split, peeled willow and black devil's claw on a two or three willow rod foundation that coils clockwise. The designs were occasionally painted on instead of weaving them into the baskets. They made a self-bow shorter than that of the Mojave, with recurved ends, the back painted, and the middle wrapped. Arrows were often made of cane, and sometimes willow, with a foreshaft and a flint point. Houses were shelters against the wind and sun (Kroeber 1925:597-598; Laird 1976:5). The bow used in war was sinew-backed hickory, which was very hard to draw. It was short and powerful. Another kind of bow was made of the antler of the mule deer (Laird 1976:240). Bows for hunting were made of sinew-backed willow. The adoption of the sinew-backed bow permitted the Chemehuevi to hunt big game, thus improving their supply of protein food (Laird 1976:5-6). The principle material used for houses was brush. Of the four different kinds of houses they made, one was the flat or shade house, built for ceremonial occasions. A flat roof of brush was laid across four notched posts. Another roof that sloped to the ground on the west side was built above the flat roof to provide extra protection from the sun. In addition, a very large flat house was built to hold the goods brought to a Cry to be burned or given away (Laird 1976:42-43). Source: majavedesert.netRead more

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Bronze Sculptures : Charles Marion Russell (1864-1926) Bronze-"Bronco

Bronze Sculptures 459. Charles Russell (1864-1926) Bronze-"Bronco Buster". 24" high by 19 inches across and weighs approximately 48 pounds. The casting is done in rough, but the detail is very good and one can actually see the detail in the Cowboy's spur wheel on the boot shown in the snap. In very good overall condition given estimated age is 1930's. C.M. Russell signature is on the base From an estate in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. This bronze statue by Charles Russell is handmade and cast in the traditional Lost Wax Casting Process. This insures a quality bronze sculpture that may be passed down from generation to generation. The Bronco Twister is Charles Russell's most famous bronze piece. It has been said that it may be one of the best bucking horses done during that era. The surface of this bronze is dark from the casting process. Charles Marion Russell (March 19, 1864 October 24, 1926),[1][2] also known as C. M. Russell, Charlie Russell, and "Kid" Russell, was an artist of the Old American West. Russell created more than 2,000 paintings of cowboys, Indians, and landscapes set in the Western United States and in Alberta, Canada, in addition to bronze sculptures. Known as 'the cowboy artist',[3] Russell was also a storyteller and author. The C. M. Russell Museum Complex located in Great Falls, Montana houses more than 2,000 Russell artworks, personal objects, and artifacts. Russell's mural titled Lewis and Clark Meeting the Flathead Indians hangs in the state capitol building in Helena, Montana. Russell's 1918 painting Piegans sold for $5.6 million at a 2005 auction.[4] Art was always a part of Russell's life. Growing up in Missouri, he drew sketches and made clay figures of animals. Russell had an intense interest in the wild west and would spend hours reading about it. Russell would watch explorers and fur traders who frequently came through Missouri. Russell learned to ride horses at Hazel Dell Farm near Jerseyville, Illinois on a famous Civil War horse called "Great Britain". Russell's instructor was Col. William H. Fulkerson who had married into the Russell family. At the age of sixteen, Russell left school and went to Montana to work on a sheep ranch.[5] Adulthood Russell came to Montana in 1880 at the age of 16. After an unsuccessful stint working on a sheep ranch, he found work with a hunter and trapper turned rancher named Jake Hoover, who owned a ranch in the Judith Basin, and from whom Russell learned much about the ways of the west. The two men remained lifelong friends.[6] After a brief visit to his family in 1882, he returned to Montana, where he remained for the rest of his life. He worked as a cowboy for a number of outfits, and documented the harsh winter of 1886-1887 in a number of watercolors.[6] Russell was working on the O-H Ranch in the Judith Basin of Central Montana at the time, when the ranch foreman received a letter from the owner, asking how the cattle herd had weathered the winter. Instead of a letter, the ranch foreman sent a postcard-sized watercolor Russell had painted of gaunt steer being watched by wolves under a gray winter sky. The ranch owner showed the postcard to friends and business acquaintances and eventually displayed it in a shop window in Helena, Montana. After this, work began to come steadily to the artist. Russell's caption on the sketch, "Waiting for a Chinook", became the title of the drawing, and Russell later created a more detailed version which is one of his best-known works. Beginning in 1888, Russell spent a period living with the Blood Indians, a branch of the Blackfeet nation.[7] It is believed that much of his intimate knowledge of Native American culture came from this period.[6] Upon returning to white culture in 1889, he found the Judith Basin filling up with settlers, so he worked in more open places for a couple of years before settling in the area of Great Falls, Montana, in 1892, in an attempt to make a living as a full-time artist.[6] In 1896, Russell married his wife Nancy. He was 32 and she was 18.[6] In 1897, they moved from the small community of Cascade, Montana to the bustling county seat of Great Falls, where Russell spent the majority of his life from that point on. There, Russell continued with his art, becoming a local celebrity and gaining the acclaim of critics worldwide. As Russell was not skilled in marketing his work, Nancy is generally given credit in making Russell an internationally known artist. She set up many shows for Russell throughout the United States and in London, creating many followers of Russell. In 1913, Russell painted Wild Horse Hunters which depicts riders capturing wild horses, each band of which is dominated by a stallion. He used as much color as an artist could on his mountain landscapes.[8] Russell the artist arrived on the cultural scene at a time when the "wild west" was being chronicled and sold back to the public in many forms, ranging from the dime novel to the wild west show and soon evolved into motion picture shorts and features of the silent era, the westerns that have become a movie staple. Russell was fond of these popular art forms and made many friends among the well-off collectors of his works, including actors and film makers such as William S. Hart, Harry Carey, Will Rogers and Douglas Fairbanks. Russell also kept up with other artists of his ilk, including fellow Old West painter Edgar Samuel Paxson, painter Edward "Ed" Borein and Will Crawford the illustrator. On the day of Russell's funeral in 1926, all the children in Great Falls were released from school to watch the funeral procession. Russell's coffin was displayed in a glass sided coach, pulled by four black horses.[9] A collection of short stories called Trails Plowed Under[10] was published a year after his death. In 1929 Nancy Russell published a collection of Charlie's letters titled Good Medicine. Many Russell paintings and bronze works are displayed in the Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth, Texas, as well as the R.W. Norton Art Gallery in Shreveport, Louisiana along with the other most prominent western artist Frederic Remington. Additional major collections of Russell art can be found at the Montana Historical Society museum in Helena, Montana, the C.M. Russell Museum in Great Falls, Montana and the Rockwell Museum in Corning, New York. Along with Jeannette Rankin, the first female member of the United States Congress, Russell represents Montana in the National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol. In 1960, Charles M. Russell Elementary School was built in Missoula, Montana. In 1965, a high school was built on the north side of the Missouri River in Great Falls, Montana and named Charles M. Russell High School, in honor of Russell. Ian Tyson's 1987 album, Cowboyography, includes a song titled "The Gift" telling the story of Russell. Michael Nesmith, of Monkees fame, recorded a song titled "Laugh Kills Lonesome" which was inspired by, and describes the contents of, a well-known Russell painting of the same name. Native Blackfeet folk singer Jack Gladstone wrote a song dedicated to Russell titled "When the Land Belonged to God." The song describes Russell's painting of the same name. In 1991, Russell was inducted into the St. Louis Walk of Fame.[11] Some of Russell's paintings were shown during the credits of the ABC television series How the West Was Won, starring James Arness. The Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge is named for Russell, a World War II Liberty Ship, SS Charles M. Russell, was named in his honor and launched in 1943 in Portland, Oregon. Auction success Russell's Piegans sold in 2005 for $5.6 million, more than double the highest price his work had sold for a few years earlier.[12] At auction in 2008, Russell's oil painting The Hold Up (20 Miles to Deadwood) sold for $5.2 million, and his bronze sculpture Buffalo Hunt (which depicted two Native Americans attacking a running bison) sold for $4.1 million.[12] In July 2009, Russell's 1907 watercolor and gouache The Truce went for $2.03 million to an anonymous phone bidder.[13] Russell's 1911 18 inches (460 mm) by 13 inches (330 mm) bronze sculpture, Bronc Twister, auctioned in 2008 for $805,000‰ÛÓfar above the $300,000 pre-auction estimate.[14] In July 2011, the price of Russell's work soared again. His 1892 oil painting Water for Camp (depicting Native American women dipping pots into a stream) and his 1924 watercolor A Dangerous Sport (in which two cowboys lasso a mountain lion) sold for nearly $1.5 million each.[12] A collection of 30 pieces of Russell's art were sold for several million dollars at the Coeur d‰۪Alene Art Auction (held in Reno, Nevada) in July 2014, setting new records for many pieces. Russell's Trail of the Iron Horse watercolor (depicting a group of horseback Native Americans contemplating railroad track) sold for $1.9 million, while Dakota Chief (which depicts a young Lakota chieftain on horseback) was auctioned for $1.1 million (almost double the last price it commanded). Even small pencil sketches sold for $25,000.[15] Notable works Russell's works comprised a wide variety of topics, including major historical events and everyday life in the west. His work was noted for the frequency with which he portrayed well-known events from the point of view of Native American people instead of the non-Native viewpoint. He was noted for a keen eye on the social undercurrents of society and the meticulous authenticity with which he portrayed the clothing and equipment of both cowboys and Native people. His portrayal of women has drawn critiques and assessment from historians studying women in the west. The contrasting levels of sensuality in his depictions of white and native women is noted in his artistic transference of sexuality from white to Native women, so as to conform to the moral standards and perceptions of women in his time. Most of Russell's portrayals of white women are shown as "pure" and non-sexual, other than those paintings specifically depicting prostitutes. In contrast, his series of five "Keeoma" paintings and related images show a sensual native woman, with accompanying legends that Keeoma was a real person that Russell had loved. However, photographs show that the body model for these images was actually Russell's wife, Nancy, who in doing so, critics note, was able to express her sexuality in a way generally not allowed "decent" white women of the time.[16] Notes 1. Jump up ^ Dates and locations taken from Charles M. Russell, pg.1 & 318 2. Jump up ^ Opitz, Editor, Glenn B. (1987). Mantle Fielding's Dictionary of american Painters, Sculptors & Engravers. Poughkeepsie, NY: Apollo Book. p. 1047. ISBN 0-938290-04-5. 3. Jump up ^ "Retrieved 22-07-2009". Biographi.ca. Retrieved 2012-03-06. 4. Jump up ^ "2005 auction results". Coeur d'Alene Art Auction. Retrieved July 26, 2008. 5. Jump up ^ Tribune Staff. "125 Montana Newsmakers: Charles Marion Russell". Great Falls Tribune. Retrieved August 28, 2011. 6. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Paladin, Vivian A. "Facts and Reflections About Charles M. Russell". Art Montana. Retrieved November 6, 2011. 7. Jump up ^ Osmundson, Linda L. How the West Was Drawn: Cowboy Charlie's Art. Books.google.com. 2011-02-15. Retrieved 2012-05-05. 8. Jump up ^ Russell exhibit, Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas 9. Jump up ^ Taliaferro, John Charles M. Russell: The Life and Legend of America's Cowboy Artist University of Oklahoma Press, 2003 p. 264 ISBN 978-0-8061-3495-6 10. Jump up ^ "Trails Plowed Under". Gutenberg.net.au. Retrieved 2012-03-06. 11. Jump up ^ St. Louis Walk of Fame. "St. Louis Walk of Fame Inductees". stlouiswalkoffame.org. Retrieved 25 April 2013. 12. ^ Jump up to: a b c Griffith, Martin. "Bierstadt, Russell Paintings Fetch Millions at Reno Auction." Great Falls Tribune. July 26, 2011. 13. Jump up ^ "In Brief: Couer D'Alene."Art+Auction, October 2009. 14. Jump up ^ "Russell Bronze 'Bronc Twister' Top Hand At Richard Opfer's." Antiques and Arts Online. September 23, 2008. Accessed 2010-05-19. 15. Jump up ^ Griffith, Martin (August 2, 2014). "Charles M. Russell's Artwork Sells for Millions at Reno Auction". The Washington Post. Retrieved August 3, 2014. 16. Jump up ^ Armitage, Susan Hodge. "The Women's West". Books.google.com. Retrieved 2012-05-05. Further reading ‰ۢ Adams, Ramon F. and Home E. Britzman, Charles M. Russell: The Cowboy Artist ‰ÛÒ A Biography, Trail's End Publishing, Pasadena, California. 1948. ‰ۢ Gale, Robert L., "Charles Marion Russell" Western Writers Series, Boise State University. Boise, Idaho. 1979. ‰ÛÒ available via the Western Writers Series Digital Editions ‰ۢ Hoeber, Arthur (July 1911). "The Painter Of The West That Has Passed: The Work Of Charles M. Russell". The World's Work: A History of Our Time XXII: 14625‰ÛÒ14635. Retrieved 2009-07-10. ‰ۢ Russell, Charles M. Good Medicine: Memories of the Real West Garden City Publishing Company, Garden City, NY, 1930. Includes introduction by Will Rogers and biographical note and dedication by Nancy C. Russell. ‰ۢ Stauffer, Joan, Behind Every Man: The Story of Nancy Cooper Russell, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma. 2008. (Source: Wikipedia)Read more

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Storage Jar : Small Pre-Columbian Chancay Pottery Storage Jar #344

Storage Jar 344. Description: Peru, Ca 1000 to 1200 CE Small storage jar nicely decorated. 6" x 6". Provenance: Ex Brining Collection, collected some 40 years ago. Condition: Ware as expected, but generally intact and excellent for its age. All items are unconditionally guaranteed to be Authentic as described. For added security we offer a full money-back guarantee if a recognized authority disputes the authenticity of any object sold. History: Not much is known about the Chancay civilization which developed in the later part of the Inca empire. This culture emerged after the fall of the Wari civilization. Parts of the southern Chancay area were conquered by the Chim̼ in the early fifteenth century and in about 1450 A.D. the Incas were occupying both areas. [1] It is believed that the Chancay had a centralized political structure, forming a small regional state.[3] Thus the Chancay culture declined in the fifteenth century to make way for the territorial expansion of the Inca Empire. Occupying the central coast coastal region of Peru, the Chancay were centered mostly in the Chancay and ChillÌ_n valleys, although they also occupied other areas such as the Rimac and Lurin valley areas. [2] The center of the Chancay culture was located 80 kilometers north of Lima. It is a desert region but has fertile valleys bathed by rivers and is rich in resources that allowed for, among other things, extensive agricultural development. The Chancay developed intense trade relations with other regions, allowing them to interract with other cultures and settlements in a wide area. Economy: The Chancay culture based its economy on agriculture, fishing and trade. Water reservoirs and irrigation canals were built by engineers in order to develop agriculture. As the culture was geographically located on the oceanfront, they were involved in traditional fishing both from the shore as well as further out to sea from their caballitos de totora, an ancient type of watercraft unique to Peru. The Chancay also traded with other regions either by land towards the Peruvian highlands and jungle or by sea to the north and south of their borders. The settlements in Lauri, Lumbra, Tambo Blanco, Handrail, Pisquillo Chico and Tronconal focused mainly on artisans producing large-scale ceramics and textiles. The Chancay culture is the first of the Peruvian cultures that had mass production of ceramics, textiles and metals such as gold and silver which were ritualistic and domestic goods. They were also noted for their wood carved items. [1] The curacas, political leaders, regulated the production of artisans, farmers and ranchers as well as oversaw festive activities. Textiles: The most well-known Chancay artefacts are the textiles which ranged from embroidered pieces, different types of fabrics decorated with paint. A variety of techniques, colours and themes were used in the making of textiles.[2] They used an array of colours including yellows, browns, scarlet, white, blues and greens.[1] types of fabric used included: llama wool, cotton, chiffon and feathers.[2] Their technique involved were decorated open weave, brocade, embroidery, and painting.[2] Brushes were used to paint anthropomorphic, zoomorphic, geometric and other creative designs directly on the canvases. The Chancay are known for the quality of their painted tapestries. The typically geometric designs also included drawings of plants, animals such as fish, cats, birds, monkeys and dogs (most notably the hairless Peruvian dog[4]) as well as human figures.[3] Birds and deities wearing crescent-like headdresses were one of the more common decorative features.[1] They produced a variety of goods such as clothing, bags, and funeral masks.[2] Many Chancay textiles survive to date. It is believed that their production was quite extensive, due to the quantities that have been preserved. The quality of the textile material appears to be good as they were carefully made. [1] Canvases or gauzes were used primarily for religious and magical purposes. They were made for covering the head of the dead in the form of a headdresses. According to the beliefs of the time, the threads on these fabrics had to be spun in the form of an "S" in an anticlockwise direction. This thread, which had a magical character, was called lloque and, according to legend, the garments were infused with supernatural powers and served as protection in the afterlife. Feathers were inserted into a main thread which was then sewn onto the fabric. The Chancay also manufactured dolls and other objects covered with pieces of woven fabric and various threads. Ceramics: Ceramics are also a very common feature of the Chancay culture. This pottery has been found mainly in the cemeteries of the Ancon and Chancay valleys. The Chancay civilization produced ceramics on a large scale using moulds. However, open vessels with more than 400 different types of drawings that have yet to be decrypted, uniquely created by artisans, have been found. The technique used in creating ceramics was with a rough matt surface that was later painted with a dark colour, usually black or brown, on top of a lighter cream or white background. This dark on light characteristic is known as black on white. Vessels are often large and quaintly shaped. Egg-shaped jars are some of the more common. Ceramic dolls or female figurines were also created. These were usually large, female-looking dolls made from clay. The faces and sometimes the upper sections of the body are covered with ornaments of different geometric shapes.[1] The eyes were accentuated with a line on each side and the arms were usually short.[3] These geometric ornamentations are very common on Chancay ceramics.[1] Other common ceramic vessels were oblong jars with narrow necks and wide mouths, with designs in the form of human faces and geometric shapes painted in the black on cream technique. Other common animal shapes are birds or llamas. [3] There were also miniature sized idols called cuchimilcos which were anthropomorphic shapes representative of human figures, having prominent jaws and eyes painted in black. These cuchimilcos figures usually had their arms extended as if they were ready to fly or inviting a hug. It is believed that they were used to turn away bad energies. This is perhaps why they have been mostly found in the tombs of the Chancay nobility. Woodwork: The wood carvings done by the Chancay are characterized by their simplicity, sobriety [2] and use of shapes from nature, quite opposed to the sophistication of their textile art. From wood they produced implements of daily use, statues and items for decoration, some of which they painted.[2] Using the wood from their coastal desert the Chancay carved large and small objects, finely engraved with motifs reflecting the marine environment, such as seabirds and boats. They also manufactured tools for use in the textile work, in farming and fishing operations, as well as a variety of objects for worship and to distinguish the social status of the populace. Human heads carved in wood were common. They were used to crown the mummies of important dignitaries, as a mark of their status as deity or mythical ancestor, which they acquired after death. The human images in wood could also be indicators of political power, especially when they were carved into sticks or batons of command. Architecture and social organization: With respect to architecture, this civilization is noted for creating large urban centres with pyramid-shaped mounds and complex buildings. It was organized by different types of settlements or ayllus and controlled by leaders or curacas. The urban centres had typical constructions for civic-religious purposes which also included residential palaces. These urban centers were quite large, perhaps due to the mass production of goods. [2] Their culture was marked by social stratification, which was also present in the small towns. The constructions were mostly made of adobe bricks, were organized in clusters and were also similarly designed according to a specific pattern. Sometimes the most prominent constructions were mixed or combined with stones. Its inhabitants were settled based on their trade so that they could massify the production of goods. Access to the pyramids was through ramps, i.e. from top to bottom. Their hydraulic engineering works such as reservoirs and irrigation canals were also of great notoriety. [2] (Source: Wikipedia) References 1 "The Chancay Culture". Retrieved 18 February 2013. 2. "Central Andes". Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino. Retrieved 18 February 2013. 3. "Featured Artifacts: Chancay Culture, AD 1000-1400". SFU Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. Retrieved 18 February 2013. 4. "Per̼ celebra 24 a̱os de reconocimiento mundial a perro sin pelo". El Universal. 14 June 2009. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 5. WikipediaRead more

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Frederic Remington, signed Bronze Sculpture "The Outlaw" #433 Sold Out

Frederic Remington Bronze Sculpture 433. Description: Frederic Remington, Solid bronze sculpture of The Outlaw. Signed and mounted on marble base. First created in 1906, The Outlaw is one of Remington's later pieces using the lost wax method. The Outlaw was known as the real companion to The Bronco Buster. It is the teeter to The Bronco Buster's totter, what comes up in one comes down in the other. Giant jolts of endless energy were what this cowboy was feeling as the horse would rear up putting full force on all fronts. The Outlaw's rider seems to bestow a great amount of fluidity and control. However, this cowboy is not going to win any points by resting his hand on the side of his horse. Yet, on a safer side he stands a chance of not getting his coccyx dislocated. This cowboy was a first class bronco-buster or flash rider. These riders would receive high wages, wages that were well deserved, because this was one of the most dangerous jobs there were and no man could ever hope to grow old. The idea for this casting was taken from that of an old sketch that Remington had done years before called the Sun Fisher. In this sketch the rigorous life of a flash rider was shown. This cowboy was trying to beat the odds to stay on the bronc. (Source: By: Shannon J. Hatfield- Remington art. Com). Dimensions: 23" x 15" Provenance: From a Bethesda, MD estate. Condition Report: Mint with a very nice patina from age and touching it over the years. Estimated age is mid 20th Century. Frederic Remington (1861-1909) Depicted the life of the cowboy during the 1880's and 1890's better perhaps than any other artist of his time. He thought of himself as a true citizen of the American West. A native of Canton, New York, Remington left college at the age of 19, looking for adventure in the West. Remington operated his own ranch in Kansas and in 1886 he gave it up as a failure and came back to the East. The experience served him well in his later career as an artist. "What success I have had", Remington once told a newspaper reporter, "has been because I have a horseman's knowledge of a horse. No one can draw equestrian subjects unless he is an equestrian himself". As an artist, Remington first made a name for himself as an illustrator and painter, and began sculpting only 14 years before his death in 1909. "I was impelled to try my hand at sculpture by a mental desire to say something in the round as well as flat. Sculpture is the most perfect expression of action. You can say it all in clay." The first Remington in clay was "Bronco Buster", completed in 1895. Among his admirers were Theodore Roosevelt, who once said that "Remington portrayed a most characteristic and yet vanishing type of American life. The soldier, the cowboy, the rancher, the Indian, the horses and cattle of the plains will live in his pictures and bronzes, I verily believe for all time". (Source: F&R Bronze)Read more

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Naga Cowrie Shells : Authentic Chang Warrior Sash with Six Double

Naga Cowrie Shells Authentic Chang Warrior Sash with Six Double Cowrie Shell Circles 616. Authentic Chang Warrior Sash with six Double Cowrie Shell Circles. Finely woven sash with stitched cowrie shells. This would have been part of a pair worn in crisscross fashion across a Chang warrior's chest. Weaving and supplemental weaving, sometimes with red dyed dog's hair, are extremely fine. The sash is 68 inches long and 4.5 inches wide. All the cowrie shells are in tack and the piece is in extremely good condition for its use and age which is estimated to be early to mid 19th century. Please note that the designation Authentic means that the piece was made by the Nagas and used by them in their actual ceremonies and not made for tourists. Nagaland has a rich diversity of ethnic groups, languages and religions. More than 80% of the population lives in small, isolated villages and practice their own rituals and traditions that have been existing since centuries. The Nagas are said to belong to the Indo-Mongoloid stock, a race whose presence was first noted ten centuries before Christ, at the time of the compilation of the Vedas. The Nagas are mostly Christians. Naga Features: The Nagas are usually medium sized. The nose is flat, eyes curved, complexion fair, and hair straight. Men are muscular and women are usually short. One unique feature of the Nagas is that they wear conical red headgear decorated with wild boar canine teeth and white black Hornbill feathers, the spear with the shaft decorated with red black hairs and the unique dao with broad blade and long handle. Both men and women wear traditional Naga jewelry. Naga shawls are very famous among the tribes. Tattooing is customary among the tribes. Nagaland Culture The tribes of Nagaland are unique in their culture and traditions. The tribes are excellent and skilled craftsmen. Naga tribes are known for being hard working and laborious. They are known for making exquisite bamboo and cane products, weaving and wood carving. The Nagas are expert in basketry, weaving, woodcarving, pottery and metal work. Agriculture is the main occupation of the people. Rice, millet and Taro potato are grown by the people. The tribes of Nagaland are very fond of dance and music. Music forms an essential parts of their lives. There are different traditional dances and music of the different tribes. The music of is characterized by folk songs and music accentuated by traditional instruments. People of Nagaland are also famous for celebrating numerous seasonal fairs and festivals. All the tribes celebrate their own distinct festivals with dance and music. The most important festivals celebrated by the tribes include Sekrenyi, Moatsu Mong, Suhkruhnye, Bushu, Yemshe, and Metumniu among others. The food of the Naga tribe consist of rice, millet, vegetables, fish, meat, Naga chilly and chutney. Nagaland Village System: The tribes live mainly in villages. For the Nagas family is the most important institution. Women are treated equally with men. Nagas are traditionally and tribally organized with a strong warrior tradition. Head hunting is an important aspect of the people. Most of the houses of the Nagas have skull displaying their warrior qualities. Different Tribes of Nagaland: Nagaland is home to some 16 different kinds of tribes with distinct and fascinating cultures. Each of the Naga tribe is divided into as many as twenty clans. The Nagas speak 60 different dialects. The prominent tribes are Angami, Ao, Chakhesang, Chang, Khiamniungan, Konyak, Lotha, Pochury, Phom, Poumai, Rongmei Naga, Rengma, Sangtam, Sema, Mao and Zeliang among many others. The languages of the Nagas may vary from Angami-Pochury, Ao, Kukish, Sal, Tangkhul and Zeme branches of Tibeto Burman. Some important tribes are: Angami Naga: The Angami Nagas are one of the major tribes of Nagaland. The Angamis mainly celebrate the Sekrenyi festival. They are basically hill people and depend on agriculture for their mode of livelihood. 98 % of the Angamis are Christians. Ao Naga: Ao Nagas are another major tribes in Nagaland. They reside mainly in Tsula to Tsurang in Mokokchung district. The Ao Nagas are known for the celebration of different harvest festivals. The Aos are primarily Christians. Chang: Changs are one of the recognized Scheduled Tribes in India. The traditional territory of the Chang lies in the Central Tuensang district. About 99 % of the Changs are Christians. They speak the Chang language and the Chang people are very fond of music and dance. They celebrate Christmas, Naknyu Lem, Poang Lem, Jeinyu Leam and so many other festivals with fanfare and gaiety. Konyak: Konyak have the largest populations among the Nagas. They are found in the Mon district of Nagaland. They are famous for their tattoos all over their faces and hands. Lotha: Lotha is also a major Naga tribe and reside in the Wokha district. They are popular for traditional dance and folk songs. Sumi: Sumi Nagas are one of the major Naga tribes. They mainly inhabit in the Zunheboto district. 99 % of the Sumis are Christians. Tuluni and Ahuna are the most important festivals of the Sumis. Yimchunger: Yimchunger is a minor Naga group. Metmneo festival is celebrated by the Yimchunge people. Khiamniungan: Khiamniungan is comparatively a minor Naga group. They mainly reside in the Tuensang district in Nagaland. Miu festival and Tsokum festival are the most important festivals celebrated by this tribal group. (Source: India on line) Tangkhul: Tangkhul is a Naga tribe living in the Indo-Burma border area occupying the Ukhrul district in Manipur, India and the Somra Tangkhul hills (Somra tract) in Upper Burma. Despite this international border, many Tangkhul have continued to regard themselves as "one nation".[1] Further reading Stirn, Aglaja & Peter van Ham. The Hidden world of the Naga: Living Traditions in Northeast India. London: Prestel. Oppitz, Michael, Thomas Kaiser, Alban von Stockhausen & Marion Wettstein. 2008. Naga Identities: Changing Local Cultures in the Northeast of India. Gent: Snoeck Publishers. Kunz, Richard & Vibha Joshi. 2008. Naga A Forgotten Mountain Region Rediscovered. Basel: Merian. Alban von Stockhausen: Imag (in) ing the Nagas: The Pictorial Ethnography of Hans-Eberhard Kauffmann and Christoph von FÌ_rer-Haimendorf. Arnoldsche, Stuttgart 2014, ISBN 978-3-89790-412-5. ( Source: Times of India)Read more

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Woman's Skirt : Authentic Naga Angami Woman's Black Skirt with Green

Woman's Skirt Authentic Naga Angami Woman's Black Skirt with Green and Red Stripes 646. Authentic Naga Angami Woman's black skirt with green and red stripes. The piece is 60 inches long and 36 inches wide, It is in excellent condition considering its use and age which is estimated to be Late 1970's-Early 1980's. Please note that the designation Authentic means that the piece was made by the Nagas and used by them in their actual ceremonies and not made for tourists. Nagaland has a rich diversity of ethnic groups, languages and religions. More than 80% of the population lives in small, isolated villages and practice their own rituals and traditions that have been existing since centuries. The Nagas are said to belong to the Indo-Mongoloid stock, a race whose presence was first noted ten centuries before Christ, at the time of the compilation of the Vedas. The Nagas are mostly Christians. Naga Features: The Nagas are usually medium sized. The nose is flat, eyes curved, complexion fair, and hair straight. Men are muscular and women are usually short. One unique feature of the Nagas is that they wear conical red headgear decorated with wild boar canine teeth and white black Hornbill feathers, the spear with the shaft decorated with red black hairs and the unique dao with broad blade and long handle. Both men and women wear traditional Naga jewelry. Naga shawls are very famous among the tribes. Tattooing is customary among the tribes. Nagaland Culture The tribes of Nagaland are unique in their culture and traditions. The tribes are excellent and skilled craftsmen. Naga tribes are known for being hard working and laborious. They are known for making exquisite bamboo and cane products, weaving and wood carving. The Nagas are expert in basketry, weaving, woodcarving, pottery and metal work. Agriculture is the main occupation of the people. Rice, millet and Taro potato are grown by the people. The tribes of Nagaland are very fond of dance and music. Music forms an essential parts of their lives. There are different traditional dances and music of the different tribes. The music of is characterized by folk songs and music accentuated by traditional instruments. People of Nagaland are also famous for celebrating numerous seasonal fairs and festivals. All the tribes celebrate their own distinct festivals with dance and music. The most important festivals celebrated by the tribes include Sekrenyi, Moatsu Mong, Suhkruhnye, Bushu, Yemshe, and Metumniu among others. The food of the Naga tribe consist of rice, millet, vegetables, fish, meat, Naga chilly and chutney. Nagaland Village System: The tribes live mainly in villages. For the Nagas family is the most important institution. Women are treated equally with men. Nagas are traditionally and tribally organized with a strong warrior tradition. Head hunting is an important aspect of the people. Most of the houses of the Nagas have skull displaying their warrior qualities. Different Tribes of Nagaland: Nagaland is home to some 16 different kinds of tribes with distinct and fascinating cultures. Each of the Naga tribe is divided into as many as twenty clans. The Nagas speak 60 different dialects. The prominent tribes are Angami, Ao, Chakhesang, Chang, Khiamniungan, Konyak, Lotha, Pochury, Phom, Poumai, Rongmei Naga, Rengma, Sangtam, Sema, Mao and Zeliang among many others. The languages of the Nagas may vary from Angami-Pochury, Ao, Kukish, Sal, Tangkhul and Zeme branches of Tibeto Burman. Some important tribes are: Angami Naga: The Angami Nagas are one of the major tribes of Nagaland. The Angamis mainly celebrate the Sekrenyi festival. They are basically hill people and depend on agriculture for their mode of livelihood. 98 % of the Angamis are Christians. Ao Naga: Ao Nagas are another major tribes in Nagaland. They reside mainly in Tsula to Tsurang in Mokokchung district. The Ao Nagas are known for the celebration of different harvest festivals. The Aos are primarily Christians. Chang: Changs are one of the recognized Scheduled Tribes in India. The traditional territory of the Chang lies in the Central Tuensang district. About 99 % of the Changs are Christians. They speak the Chang language and the Chang people are very fond of music and dance. They celebrate Christmas, Naknyu Lem, Poang Lem, Jeinyu Leam and so many other festivals with fanfare and gaiety. Konyak: Konyak have the largest populations among the Nagas. They are found in the Mon district of Nagaland. They are famous for their tattoos all over their faces and hands. Lotha: Lotha is also a major Naga tribe and reside in the Wokha district. They are popular for traditional dance and folk songs. Sumi: Sumi Nagas are one of the major Naga tribes. They mainly inhabit in the Zunheboto district. 99 % of the Sumis are Christians. Tuluni and Ahuna are the most important festivals of the Sumis. Yimchunger: Yimchunger is a minor Naga group. Metmneo festival is celebrated by the Yimchunge people. Khiamniungan: Khiamniungan is comparatively a minor Naga group. They mainly reside in the Tuensang district in Nagaland. Miu festival and Tsokum festival are the most important festivals celebrated by this tribal group. (Source: India on line) Tangkhul: Tangkhul is a Naga tribe living in the Indo-Burma border area occupying the Ukhrul district in Manipur, India and the Somra Tangkhul hills (Somra tract) in Upper Burma. Despite this international border, many Tangkhul have continued to regard themselves as "one nation".[1] Further reading Stirn, Aglaja & Peter van Ham. The Hidden world of the Naga: Living Traditions in Northeast India. London: Prestel. Oppitz, Michael, Thomas Kaiser, Alban von Stockhausen & Marion Wettstein. 2008. Naga Identities: Changing Local Cultures in the Northeast of India. Gent: Snoeck Publishers. Kunz, Richard & Vibha Joshi. 2008. Naga A Forgotten Mountain Region Rediscovered. Basel: Merian. Alban von Stockhausen: Imag (in) ing the Nagas: The Pictorial Ethnography of Hans-Eberhard Kauffmann and Christoph von FÌ_rer-Haimendorf. Arnoldsche, Stuttgart 2014, ISBN 978-3-89790-412-5.(Source: Times of India)Read more

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Pottery Jar : Excellent Native American Acoma Pottery Jar by Emma

Native America Acoma Pottery Jar 216. Description: Native American, Acoma Pottery Jar, 1980's 90's black on white bird design signed Emma Chino 4"x 5". Emmalita C. Chino (Emma Chino, signs E. Chino, Acoma N.M.), Acoma, active from 1942 to present, traditional and ceramic jars, bowls, Born June 6, 1931. Daughter of Margaret Charlie, daughter in law of Marie Z. Chino, wife of Patrick Chino, mother of Brenda Charlie and Monica Chino. Teacher was Marie Z. Chino. Numerous awards, art shows in New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah. Many publications to include: Minge 1991:193 and Dillingham 1992: 206-208. Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo's local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated most frequently with paint and occasionally with applique. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo's pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and poly chrome a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce un-decorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.. (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona)Read more

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James Regimbal, Bronze Sculpture “The Roper”, 1/50, ca 1978, #832 SOLD

James Regimbal Bronze Sculpture, "The Roper" 832. Description: James P Regimbal (American, Born 1949) Bronze Figural Group of Cowboy and Horse, inscribed "The Roper", Jim Regimbal 1/50 (edition), 1978, mounted on wood base. Dimensions 14 3/4 x 15 x 9 1/2 inches. Condition: Excellent condition considering the age. ---------- You can find more of James’ work at https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16131018 ------------ Artist: James Regimbal strives to pass on the true story of our American heritage through his bronze sculpture. According to James: “Only the best of my work is good enough to be cast in bronze...Perfection from me, is the first step.” Regimbal creates very detailed, historically accurate bronzes. Taking his inspiration from true to life western books and western movies. Regimbal has detailed all aspects of the cowboy's life from the pre-1900. Subjects such as packers, Indians, warriors, hunters, story tellers, cavalrymen and bronco busters have all been accurately portrayed down to the minutest details by this talented sculptor. Regimbal researches every detail - buckles, pack items, saddles - all in an attempt to bring to life each scene in history as if the viewer were actually there. Regimbal's demand for excellence has resulted in hundreds of national and international collectors including the University of Montana Foundation, which has the complete collection of his works. The artist has received the George Phippen Award, and Southern Nevada Communications uses his bronzes for logos in their advertisements. It is Regimbal's desire that his sculptures will stand the test of time and keep alive a part of our romantic American history for many generations to come. (Source: May Gallery) ------------- You can find othe find art works at https://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=hdr_shop_menuRead more

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