Cultural Patina

Cultural Patina provides a platform for people to access global high quality art, easily. Since their establishment in 2014 owner Dennis has managed to collect a plethora of pottery, sculptures, textiles, jewellery from across the globe and the second largest accumulation of original Naga Indian art in US.

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Objects "Cultural Patina"

Nomad Traditional Kuchi Ethnic Ceremonial Child's Garment, #898

Nomad Traditional Kuchi Ethnic Child's Ceremonial Garment 898. Description: Fantastic traditional Ethnic handmade Kuchi baby garment. Vintage Traditional Nomad child's ceremonial garment.The piece is decorated by hand with hand made tassels, metals, shells, coins, silver, beads and other ornaments to protect against the evil eye. Front and back are almost the same, heavily adorned with all these materials. It is a one of a kind piece of art for home decoration and/or wall handing . Dimensions: Length: 20", Width: 16". Condition: Excellent Condition for its age and use. ------------ Some background on the Kuchi: The Kuchi (The Afghan Nomads): The nomadic Kuchi are potentially the largest vulnerable population in Afghanistan. For centuries their semi-annual migrations with their herds of sheep, goats, donkeys, and camels led to important contributions in terms of skins, meat, and wool to local communities. More than 80% of Afghanistan's land is suitable only for sparse grazing making this sort of seasonal migration ideal. After the war against the Soviet Union, the subsequent years of foreign-imposed war, drought, and ethnic tensions, however, the number of Kuchi, as well as the size of their herds, has dropped dramatically. The Kuchi were once celebrated in the west as handsome, romantic nomads adorned with silver and lapis jewelry. Traditionally, they have lived by selling or bartering animals, wool, meat, and dairy products for foodstuffs and other items with villagers. As they move from pasture to pasture, the Kuchi are able to escape the limits on the size of local herds, a restriction villagers are subjected to. Since the fall of the Taliban, life for most Afghans has improved. However, this has not proved true for the Kuchi. Since the 1960's, 70's, and early 80's, the Kuchi population has shrunk by 40% and many of them reside in refugee or displacement camps. The reasons are numerous. The demise of the Kuchi tradition is the result of continued war, destruction of roads, drought, air raids, Soviet bombing and other war-related causes. These problems were further compounded by the fact that the drought from 1998 to 2002 caused the loss off 75% of the Kuchi herds. Pastures have still not recovered sufficiently. In addition, landmines and other un-exploded ordinances have restricted the areas available for grazing. War also forced many Kuchi to flee their summer grazing lands in parts of central Afghanistan. When they returned, they found that locals in the areas had converted much of their pastures to farming lands. Consequently, some Kuchi have given up their nomadic lifestyle and have taken up residence on the outskirts of cities, working as laborers. Many express a desire to return to their traditional role, but many aid agencies, however, concentrate on short-term economic and humanitarian aid, rather than the sort of long-term aid the Kuchi would need to rebuild their herds. (Source: Embassy of Afghanistan) ----------- Some information on the Evil Eye Follows: ----------- The evil eye is a curse believed to be cast by a malevolent glare, usually given to a person when they are unaware. Many cultures believe that receiving the evil eye will cause misfortune or injury.Talismans created to protect against the evil eye are also frequently called "evil eyes". The idea expressed by the term causes many different cultures to pursue protective measures against it. The concept and its significance vary widely among different cultures, primarily in West Asia. The idea appears several times in translations of the Old Testament. It was a widely extended belief among many Mediterranean and Asian tribes and cultures. Charms and decorations with eye-like symbols known as nazars, which are used to repel the evil eye are a common sight across Turkey, Greece, Albania, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Southern Italy (Naples), the Levant, and Afghanistan and have become a popular choice of souvenir with tourists. (Source: Wikipedia)Read more

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Bronze Sculpture, "Global Tree of Life" by Lincoln Fox (1942-), #5

Bronze Sculpture, "Tree of Life, By Lincoln Fox, 1994 853. Description; Bronze sculpture entitled "Global Tree of Life" by Lincoln Fox ( 1942-), 1994. This is edition #5 of 5 (out of an original planned 10) maquettes of the "Global Family Tree of Life" Lincoln made these in preparation for the 32 Foot Global Family "Tree of Life" displayed, at the 1994 International Park in Nagoya, Japan. These initial studies were primarily made for several dignitaries associated with the project. One was originally given to the Queen of Jordon, another to Dr. Brown of the UNEP, Two currently reside with Culturalpatina, and the 5th is unaccounted for. The last 5 were never cast. Dimensions: The materials are cast bronze using the lost wax method, mounted on polished cut granite and routed oak along the bottom. 21-3/4" H x 17-3/4" W x 17-1/2" D. The overall weight of approximately 60 pounds. Condition: Excellent condition considering the age of the piece. ---------- Lincoln sent me a letter on the " Global Tree of Life" and I thought it was important for folks who might be interested in this piece to have. I had tears in my eyes by the time I finished reading this letter. "Since the beginnings of time, man has revered the tree as a universal metaphor of life. Tree imagery flows throughout legends and myths of every culture and many religions. The tree of Life was chosen as the symbol of the UNEP, because it represents the lungs of our planet and gives us the breath of life. Our tree icon symbolizes the nurturing aspects of life so beautifully exemplified in living trees. The emotions invoked are of gentle respect for the earth and the family of man. Each continent shows the various races populating it. The faces selected will express our beautiful uniqueness and unity, with special attention to indigenous peoples. The open ocean spaces between the continents allow visitors to enter the earth's interior. Mythological etchings and icons from many cultural and historical periods-from the cave man to the foot print of the first man on the moon-will be inside the continents. The chamber will honor the highest aspirations of man. Earth mothers representing our four primary races are seated where earth meets sky. As the tree trunk rises from the earth, stylized human figures spiral upward reaching the heavens. Our greatest desire, is for our viewers, thinking on this tree to see we are intimately and inseparably connected with the fabric of nature and that WHEN ANY ONE MAN, ANIMAL OR TREE IS HARMED, ALL MEN SUFFER. Lincoln Fox Sculptor, Tree of Life Foundation" -------------- Biography from the Archives of askART: A sculptor in traditional style of Indian figures, Lincoln Fox combines his interest in Indian culture with his belief in the sacredness of the spirits of human beings. His subjects include Shaman with Bear skull Headdress, Shaman with Owl, Bird Vision, and Hopi Snake Priest. One of his largest pieces is The Dream of Flight, 14-feet long and cantilevered 30 degrees so that it appears to fly above the ground at the Albuquerque, New Mexico Airport. Fox was born in Morrilton, Arkansas, and settled in 1971 in Alto, New Mexico. As a youngster, he was disinterested in school, but did well once he began studying art in college. He focused on studying works of famous sculptors that he admired. In 1966, he earned a BFA from the University of Texas at Austin, studying with Charles Umlaf. He then studied with Heri Barscht at the University of Dallas, earning an MA degree, and in 1968, he received an MFA from the University of Kansas at Lawrence, where Elden Teftt was his teacher. He found that once he added an element of distortion to the figures he depicted that he had arrived at the method and style most satisfactory to him. "Exaggeration and distortion make the art exciting. After that discovery, I had twice as much fun. I let things happen". (Samuels 192). Biography from The Adobe Fine Art: After living in New Mexico for over twenty years, Lincoln and his wife, Rachelle, moved to the Western Slope of Colorado in 1990. Orchards, vineyards and ranches surround his studio, in a valley of snow-capped mountains. The area's beauty and tranquility provide inspiration for his creativity. Lincoln holds two master's degrees, and continues private studies in Europe, the Mediterranean, the Mid-East, and Africa. He has been honored with one-man shows at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., the Kennedy Galleries in New York City, and many museums and galleries across the nation. Lincoln has been a member of the National Sculpture Society in New York since 1982. Some of his sculpture commissions include a 17' piece for the Albuquerque International Airport; an 18' piece for the Fine Arts Museum of Albuquerque; a 23' piece for a university in Texas; and a 14' piece near Montgomery, Alabama, dedicated by President George Bush. The Global Family Tree of Life, sanctioned by the United Nations (U.N.E.P.), is four stories tall. The Japanese prefecture of Aishi commissioned a 32-foot study, cast in metal-reinforced F.R.P. to be shown at their International Park Festival, held in Nagoya, Japan. Lincoln's powerful modeling reveals the "breath of life" in his work. Sources include: Who's Who in American Art, 2003-2004 Peggy and Harold Samuels, Contemporary Western Artists Donald Martin Reynolds, Masters of American SculptureRead more

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Native American Zia Poly chrome Pottery Storage Jar by Kathy Pino #265

Native American Zia Poly chrome Pottery Storage Jar 265. Description:Native american Zia Poly chrome storage Jar . Dimensions: 13 & 3/4 in. high x 15 & 1/2 in. diameter. Condition: Exceptional, given the age of the piece. Katherine Pino, Zia Pueblo, Coyote Clan, active ca. 1950's - present; traditional poly chrome ollas, jars, and bowls. Katherine Pino is the daughter of Ascenion Galvan Pino and Joe Pino; sister of Seferina Bell, Laura Pino, Tomasita Pino and Filamino Pino. Veronica Pino Baca recalled when Katherine Pino used to encourage her, "Come on! We're going to make some potteries." Veronica said Katherine learned from her mother, Ascenion Galvan Pino, whose pottery is in the collection of the Philbrook Museum in Tulsa, OK. Reference: Southern Pueblo Pottery: 2,000 Artist Biographies by Gregory Schaaf. A History of Pueblo Pottery: “Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo’s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated—most frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqué. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo’s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome—a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.” (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona) ---------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavRead more

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Western Artist, Lee Rommel “Spirit” Water Color Painting, Ca 1985, #962

Western Artist Lee Rommel, "Spirit" 962. Description: Lee Rommel “Spirit” Water Color Painting, Ca 1985 Condition: Excellent condition for age Dimensions: 16” x 21” Provenance: Savage Gallery, Santa Fe, NM Background Information on Artist Lee Rommel: Taken from her web site: Taken from her web site: Lee Rommel has lived and taught art in Santa Fe since 1973. She conducts weekly classes and summer plein air workshops in Santa Fe, as well as workshops for art groups in other parts of the country. Lee instructs oil painting, watercolor, pastel and acrylic as well as beginner/intermediate sculpting in clay. Before residing in Santa Fe, Lee lived in Puerto Rico, for four years. Her art career began in New York City, where she lived for 9 years. She was born and educated in Maine. Lee started her teaching career in Puerto Rico. She is a self-taught artist who feels teaching has become an education in itself for her. She has taken informal instruction from other well-known artists to hone her craft of painting, sculpting and pastel painting. Some of the artists she has studied with are, Charles Reid, Wilson Hurley, George Lundeen, George Carlson, and Glenna Goodacre. She has exhibited and won awards in many national juried and invitational shows throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. Her work has appeared in Southwest Art, The Santa Fean, Southern Living, Focus and numerous other publications and can be found in numerous private and corporate collections throughout the U.S. and Europe. Ongoing studying is very important for the serious artist." Every painting is a learning experience and a problem to be solved." Rommel travels and paints on locations rendering small oil canvases and fills watercolor journals on each trip. She uses her small paintings as studies for larger studio work. Her painting trips have taken her to Australia, New Zealand, Polynesia, Mexico and many trips to France and Italy, as well as locations close to New Mexico, and she journeys back to her birth state of Maine as well. Lee continues her passion for painting by offering private classes in her studio, painting classes at Valdes Art School (Santa Fe), and plein air classes from her studio as well. For information on these classes, see "workshops" on main menu. Lee is currently working on producing a small whimsical story book about “sheep”, including 15 watercolors inspired by her trip to New Zealand. She is working on a small photo book of her paintings as well.Read more

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Graham Twyford, Landscape Oil Painting Titled " Aira Force" from the

Graham Twyford, Landscape Oil Painting Titled " Aira Force" from the Lake District, United Kingdom, Ca 2000, #1126 Description: #1126 Graham Twyford, Landscape Oil Painting Titled " Aira Force" from the Lake District, United Kingdom. This is a set of 3 pieces to include the initial historic lithograph of Aira Force, the initial pencil and ink draft Graham did for me from actually visiting "Aira Force" , so I could get an idea of what the final painting would look like and then the final extraordinary oil painting of "Aira Force" . It has hung in my home for many years and to find an artist that provides a art grade draft and then the final painting is very very rare in the art world. Dimensions: Original historic lithograph framed: 11" x 13.5"; Draft pencil and ink draft framed, 17" x 20"; Final oil painting, 27" x 32.5" Condition: All three pieces are in outstanding condition. Some background on how I met Graham Twyford. For our Thirty Second wedding anniversary, I took Linda to the Lake District in the United Kingdom for 10 days. It was one of the most extraordinary places that we have ever visited and we fell in love with the area and the people. While we were there, we stumbled on to the Lake District Art Show and I found a painting that I like that Graham had done, unfortunately it was sold. When I came back to Va from the trip, I contacted Graham and asked him to paint me a piece from the Lake District. His first piece for me was "Aira Force". I had asked him to send a draft first and he did, once I had it, I commissioned Graham to go forward with the final oil. During our visit, I had also picked up the Historic lithograph of "Aira Force" by accident at a flea market outside of the lord Fairfax Castle. At the time, i did not know that this would be Grahams first painting for me. When I received the final painting I was overwhelmed and could almost feel Graham sitting at the actual site, painting the piece for me. Little did I know that this would spark a long term relationship with Graham and his family, who I met when they came to Va on a vacation and stayed in our home. To make a very long story short, I have ended up being one of the largest collectors of Graham Twyford's art in the United States. Graham Twyford has always taken pleasure in drawing and painting. From an early age he tried to visualize and illustrate ideas from his favorite books and mythologies, then increasingly became aware of and inspired by the renowned Lake land landscape so close to home. After training at Goldsmiths College London, graduating in Fine Art in 1979, Graham returned to Cumbria and has been painting professionally in the Lake District since then. Graham has exhibited at various venues, including the Royal Academy and is a member of the prestigious Lake Artists Society. As his work became increasing well known he was commissioned to design and illustrate a variety of subjects and his images are now widely reproduced on products from collectors ceramics to jig-saws. Graham works in many painting and graphic mediums though most of his landscape work is in oils on canvas. Taking influence from American and British painting traditions such as the Luminists and Hudson River School, he applies similar working methods in a response to the diverse lake country. Recently he has produced a series of popular paintings and reproductions exploring the atmospheric effects of light in various towns and cities in the north of England. These images not only combine expert handling of figures and buildings but reveal familiar locations in unusual and striking effects of light. Graham is constantly inspired by the dramatic and varied landscape of Cumbria, the lapping waters of lakes and crystal clear mountain streams, always seeking to capture a sudden transforming play of light over the crags and sweeping fellsides. Born in 1956 at Barrow-in-Furness, Graham Twyford grew up on Walney Island. His art education was at Lancaster College of Art, then Goldsmiths College of Art, London, where he graduated in 1979 with B.A.(Hons) Fine Art. Graham Twyford became a full-time painter in 1979 and works mainly in oil and occasionally in water colour, often using traditional ‘Old Master’ techniques which he has studied with interest over a number of years. Graham Twyford’s work is centred mainly on Landscape in the romantic tradition of British and American painting, sometimes extending to purely imaginative work inspire by the writings of J.R.R.Tolkien, C.S.Lewis or Arthurian romance. Graham Twyford’s work has been exhibited at the Royal Academy, the Royal Institute of Oil Painters, as well as in Canada and the U.S.A. and is included in many collections around the world.Read more

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Native American Large Santo Domingo Bowl by Robert Tenorio (1950-), #823

Native American Santo Domingo Bowl by Robert Tenorio 823. Native American large Santo Domingo Bowl by Robert Tenorio (b. 1950). Tan clay with a red slip, decorated with bands of black geometric designs on the exterior and corn stalks on the interior. Inscribed on the bottom edge: Robert Tenorio Santo Domingo N.M. Dimension: 8 ½” tall, 16" at shoulder. Condition: Excellent condition. ------ Robert Tenorio was born in 1950 into the Santo Domingo “Kewa” Pueblo. He has been working with clay since the age of 10. He was taught all the fundamentals of hand coiling pottery using ancient traditional methods from his family members. Lupe Tenorio shared some of her special techniques with Robert. He was also inspired to continue the long lived family tradition from the admiration he had for old pottery from his village. Robert is one of the foremost pueblo potters. He wins ribbons regularly at Santa Fe Indian Market and other prestigious competitions. His work is among the most traditional of any potters working today. All of his pieces are hand coiled and fired outdoors with cottonwood bark. He is especially well known for creating some of the largest pieces produced by any pueblo potter. Robert began his career by studying jewelry making. In 1968, he enrolled at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe. Learning to make jewelry "was the popular thing then," he recalls, plus "I wanted to make jewelry to help with the family." Robert, however, soon found himself next door in the ceramics class, "stealing their clay and potting away" Robert began by making stew bowls for his mother. When other women at the Pueblo saw them, they wanted bowls too and so Robert's mother was constantly at the school asking him to make more bowls. In those days, Robert's bowls were made from stoneware, a type of processed clay that is fired in a kiln. Today, Robert uses native clays and traditional firing methods. The black on Robert's pottery usually comes from the Rocky Mountain bee plant. "We boil the whole plant," he says, however he has discovered that boiling almost any kind of plant will produce a black juice. Robert prefers the bee plant because in the old days "it was our people's food, and it's still present in our food. We call it wild spinach." In thinking about his distinguished career, Robert observes: "I don't ever want to become too famous or too rich. We're all striving for life, and pottery is bringing me and my family life. I feel I was put in this world to revive Santo Domingo pottery. And now that I've done that, I feel good about it. I'm content. Everybody living will go, but my pots will stay here on this earth forever." He signs his pottery as: Robert Tenorio, followed by small dipper star formation, and Kewa. He is related to: Paulita Pacheco (sister), Gilbert Pacheco (brother-in-law), Hilda Coriz (sister), Ione Coriz (niece), and Juanita Tenorio (mother). Awards: -Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place -Eighth Northern Arts & Crafts Show 1st Place Publications: -Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies -Talking With the Clay -Collections of Southwestern Pottery -Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni -Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery -American Indian Pottery 2nd Edition (Source: ancientnations.com) ----------- A History of Pueblo Pottery: “Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo’s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated—most frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqué. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo’s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome—a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.” (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona) ---------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavRead more

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Copy of Western Bronze Sculpture, by Renowned Western Artist Jeff

Western Bronze Sculpture, by Renowned Western Artist Jeff Wolf, Entitled "Circle of Life", Limited Edition, Cast to Order, Precast 1 of 10, #1020 Description: Western Bronze Sculpture, by Renowned Western Artist Jeff Wolf, Entitled "Circle of Life", Limited Edition, Cast to Order, 1 of 10, “The Circle of Life” depicts just that! In nature there is no right or wrong. These two animals are both determined in their battle for survival. In creating this piece my objectives were to join opposing forces in harmony while combining as many artistic principles, The (A, B, C’s) of art as I like to refer to them as. Anatomy, Balance, Design, Composition etc. I also use a lot of mass, negative space and micking images in the composition. I have always been told to never have anything that will lead the eye away from the focal point. In this case I discovered that by using negative space I could actually lead the eye into the focal point. This all combines for a dramatic scene filled with movement in a circular design to keep the moving fluently around the work. (Note: Dimensions: 47" L x 38" H x 18"W, Approximately 200 pounds Condition: Cast to Order: On all precast orders we ask for a deposit of 75%, this covers the molds and first casting. Precast orders are purchased before the sculpture has been molded and cast in bronze. This feature allows the client to get in on the ground floor of early edition numbers while saving a considerable amount over retail. Once the work is cast in bronze and is on the retail market the price does not decrease. On orders that need to be cast we require a 50% deposit with the remainder due upon completion of the piece. Shipping and insurance are the reprehensibility of the purchaser. Delivery is usually 8-10 weeks from time of order. This piece has not been molded and cast. Precast offer $34,800.00 Provenance: Jeff Wolf Biography of Jeff Wolf and Achievements Follow: Persistence makes perfect: The trail to the top of the Western Art world is steep and narrow. It is littered with obstacles, beset with sheer drop-offs, and hindered by unexpected twists and turns. Sculptor Jeff Wolf has ridden that trail for more than twenty-five years and reached heights few artists attain. Along the way he has placed bronzes in prominent museums and permanent exhibits, in prestigious private collections, and on display in public venues. He has been bestowed with honors and awards, recognized in juried competitions, and called upon to teach and demonstrate. Jeff made—and continues—the journey on a mount called persistence. He has lived by the old cowboy maxim that it doesn’t matter how many times you get bucked off, but what counts is getting back on—brushing off adversity, dusting off disappointment, climbing back in the saddle and continuing the journey. While the ride can be a lonely one, it is not a ride Jeff makes alone. Riding with him along the way are talent and skill, creativity and vision, experience and expertise. And, of course, persistence—keeping ever after the quest to not only depict the West in art, but to capture the emotion, the motivation, the underlying aesthetics of ordinary life and extraordinary events. Saddling up; The importance of persistence was instilled in Jeff at an early age. Jeff excelled in everything he put his mind to except school. Dyslexia—virtually undiscovered at the time—made reading nearly impossible. But that didn’t stop him from graduating from high school and attending three years of college on scholarships, and eventually teaching himself to read. In high school, Jeff became a champion livestock judge and earned a silver medal at the National FFA convention, earning what was at the time the highest score ever recorded—98 out of 100—in the cattle grading division. He was also a Champion rodeo cowboy in High School, college, and a top competitor in professional rodeo, competed mainly in the bareback and bull riding events, as well as saddle bronc riding, team roping, and steer wrestling. Through it all, art sustained him. From an early age he was compelled to create. “My gift chose me, I didn’t choose it,” he says. Jeff’s story as a sculptor started at age five when he received modeling clay for Christmas. His hands and heart went to work to mold into the clay the world he saw around him. An early work, a buffalo carved from a bar of soap, earned his first recognition when published in the pages of Western Horseman magazine. With a constant driving force from within, combined with a wild imagination and insatiable desire to learn and discover, Jeff’s childhood and youth would inform his art. Along with his gift of creation he was given, in his words, “a great gift of upbringing.” Raised on a ranch in the mouth of Goshen Canyon, located south of Utah Lake, he had both the opportunities and responsibilities of any ranch kid. “I lived among the local wildlife, learned the art of handling cattle and horses, and had the fortunate opportunity to listen to the stories of real old-time cowboys, memories of which remain ingrained in my mind.” Adding to the fascination, Wolf says, was “spending most of my days, when not working on the ranch, running wild and free in the mountains, along the creeks, building hideouts, and watching wildlife or hunting.” Even anatomy lessons were in the offing. Jeff’s grandfather owned and operated a small meat packing company, which gave Jeff the opportunity to see firsthand animal anatomy from the inside out. “Grandpa used to take the front or rear leg of a beef carcass and move it as if it were walking and explain how each muscle and every bone made that movement possible.” This led Jeff to study every movement a person or animal made, trying to decipher the bones and muscles working to make that movement possible. “I developed the habit when riding for cows to ride behind another rider and watch the horse and rider as they moved as one in harmony. A nice moving horse and a true horseman is a symphony of visual music.” This curiosity and fascination with anatomy turned Jeff into a recognized master of capturing motion in sculpture. And there were other lessons to learn: Jeff says, “I know firsthand what it feels like to climb down onto the back of a bull or bucking horse, know the rush adrenaline and the explosion from the chute. I know what it’s like to sit for hour watching mule deer feed, coming so close that I could feel their breath on my hand. I have experienced the fear and drama of a stampede. And I have lived in the wild, providing for myself among the ghosts of Indians.” From his father, Jeff learned the ways of cattle and horses. “I remember one experience as if it were today,” he says. “Dad and I rode up on a cow and calf who hadn’t seen a human being all summer. She was one of those who enjoyed hiding out in country where she wasn’t easy to find. We saw each other at about the same time. Her head came up and her ears came forward, moving back and forth determining which route to take for escape. Dad said, ‘Let’s just let her look at us for a while.’ As we sat there, he explained every thought that was running through that cow’s mind by the way she her ears worked back and forth, the short, soft mooing sounds she made to her calf, her posture, and the way she looked away then back at us. “Then Dad and I rode closer, stopping every few feet so as not to pose a threat, and from a direction that would move her in the intended direction. All this, to avoid a wild chase and the possibility of losing her altogether. Within half an hour we, the cow, and the calf walked off the mountain and into the holding pasture any mishap. These are the kinds of things that have the greatest impact on my work today.” Riding out:Throughout childhood and youth, Jeff’s gift refuse to let him rest. He had to constantly be creating something. Persistence kept him sculpting, even as other interests competed for time and attention. “I didn’t sculpt a lot some years but I did keep after it. I seemed to know from my earliest years that sculpting would be my ultimate life and livelihood and I was in no hurry to get there. I was having too much fun experiencing life.” After retiring from professional rodeo, Jeff’s desire to sculpt gradually increased, fed by those very experiences. “If I haven’t personally lived the scene, I imagine myself in the time, place, and moment and visualize what it would have been like to actually be a participant. This might involve hours of research until that image or scene is fully and clearly formed in my mind. The concept then become like a photograph imprinted in my consciousness, becomes a vivid image and begs to be given life.” But three-dimensional photographic-type depictions of those scenes is not what Jeff strives for in his art. “For me,” Jeff says, “art goes far beyond mere depiction or precise rendering. I feel that true art should tell a story, put you in a place or a moment in time that stimulates the imagination and arouses the soul. It’s not about the subject matter, concept, or idea; it’s about discovery and stretching the boundaries of creativity. I strive to sculpt an experience. This is what makes me tick. Discovering how mass and negative space can be used and manipulated to become a vital part of the design. Using mirroring, and mimicking shapes to keep the eye roving around the subject to tell a story. Years of devotion to the study of art principles, combined with the determination to produce works that are worthy of the title of fine art is the motivational drive behind my work. That’s is the visual tune I dance to.” It’s not an easy dance to learn. It takes passion. Perseverance. And persistence. But those qualities, combined with an imaginative and creative mind pay off for Jeff. Then, it’s time for the work of the mind and heart to guide the hands of the sculptor.“Once the physical work begins, the piece often times takes on its own personality. I then become merely the tool that gives life to the dictation of the piece. Those times produce my finest works. “Finding ways to create the illusion of life in something like wet hair, rushing water, speed of movement, drama of action, sheer fabric flowing around the beauty of the female figure, wind whipping a mane of a stallion, or a reflection in water in a bas relief is the stimulation behind my work,” Jeff says. “I work to compose the design so that every aspect has purpose. Every line leads to another, every plane reflects light or casts a shadow for depth and dimension. Balance points create harmony and mass builds strength and stability to create a realistic illusion of movement. The synergy of opposing forces coming together and pulling apart allows me to create a greater effect, a stronger vision. My feeling is that every work I create has its own distinct personality and character. Therefore, it requires its own texture or multiple textures unique to itself as well as the composition and design that best reflects the story that is being presented. “A well-rendered pair of wrinkled and cracked work boots with worn soles and tattered laces, lying side by side as if just taken off the tired feet of the owner or even discarded will form a picture in the viewer’s mind. Some may see only a pair of boots. But others will see the life of the man who wore them— tired and wrinkled like the boots, exhausted from a hard day's labor and glad to get those old boots off his feet. Some may see dad or grandpa. Some may see a farmer plowing a field behind two mules. It really doesn’t matter what the viewer envisions, it’s the fact that a vision has been created. That is what I strive for in every work I create.” Riding on: And so Jeff Wolf went to work. And he worked. Then worked some more to blaze his own trail to the artistic heights. Making the climb, and maintaining the heights requires persistence. Over time, collectors become familiar with an artist’s background and reputation. But reputation only goes so far. If the work isn’t up to snuff, one can never expect to create or maintain demand with an inferior product. But Jeff’s persistence paid off. In 1990, art collector Ann Heckbert discovered Jeff’s sculpture at an art show in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Ann and her husband Jim, owner of Garret Gallery, approached Jeff about showing his work. By 1991, Jeff’s life as a professional sculptor was underway and has earned been his livelihood ever since. Jeff credits Jim and Ann for launching a career that has earned him a reputation as one of the finest western sculptors of our time. Jeff’s first national juried show, the George Phippen Memorial Art Show in Prescott, Arizona, earned the artist the three highest awards: Best of Show, Best in Category and People’s Choice. He has won or placed in practically every juried art show he has participated in since, and may be the only living sculptor to have won Best of Show and People’s Choice awards in six genres of Western art: Wildlife, Figural, Rodeo, Equine, Western, and Native American. Finally, while Jeff is well aware that gifts such as his are given to individuals, the trail to success isn’t one you ride alone. Persistence is often aided by the encouragement and assistance of others. He says, “The journey to the top would have been impossible if it weren’t for the help and support of family, friends, my collectors, admirers and especially my wife Jennifer.” Jeff also believes gifts are to be shared. So he now shares his talents and knowledge with fellow artists, students of the arts, and charitable foundations. He teaches workshops, lectures at schools, and sculpts at public events. Donations of time, talent, and art have generated over one million dollars for charitable causes. God-given talent, real life experience, insatiable desire to be the best, and persistence have immortally molded and cast forever the name Jeff Wolf into the world of Western art and sculpture. The portfolio of Jeff Wolf’s work is extensive, and his name is tied to some of the most prestigious collections, galleries, and museums. Persistence has placed his art in national and international collections including: • Simons Collection, Cayman Islands • Ryder Collection, Ryder Trucking • Renn and Marie Zaphiropoulos Collection (inventor of the color tube for television and, later, the developer of laser printing) • Meredith Hodges Collection and National Mule Museum, Loveland, Colorado • Mr. and Mrs. Robert Henderson • Jim Terry (former CEO of Coca-Cola) • Jack Williams (former president of Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines) • Elton Salinas (owner of Elton’s Clothier, Las Vegas, Nevada) • Richard and Carole Kreamer (Board of Directors, American Airlines) • David and Pam Furr (Gaston Law) • Jim and Ann Heckbert (Burg Simpson Law & Humble Ranch) • Steve and Mary Kay Larsen • Lori Wilkinson (Brown & Brown Insurance of Nevada, Waymark Insurance Services) • Richard Sanders (president of Kobalt Music Group) • Buck Taylor (artist and actor) • Jane Blalock (Hall of Fame Golfer) • Jim Palmer (Hall of Fame Baseball Player) Jeff has filled commissions for sculpture for: • Coca-Cola • Susan G. Koman Foundation • T.A.P.S. Foundation • Habitat for Humanity • American Lung Association • National Retriever Club and National Amateur Retriever Club • American Airlines • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation • American Bucking Bull, Inc. • Cistercian Preparatory School Hillary award • Rodeo Champions monument, Gooding ID • And several cities, corporate executives, farmers, ranchers, sportsmen, families, and friends. Jeff’s talent has introduced him to an array of TV, movie, and sports celebrities, including: • Kimberlin Brown • Dylan Bruno • Gordon Clapp • Lenny Clarke • Jeff Dunham, • Grant Goodeve • Chris Harrison • Dennis Haskins • Sandra Hess • Brad Johnson • Wendie Malick, • Ron Masak, • Marc McClure • Rob Moran • Eloise Mumford • Eric Christian Olsen • Jason Priestly • Perrey Reeves • James Sikking, • Buck Taylor • Steve Thomas • Michael Trucco. • John York • Ian Ziering Musicians, such as: • Aaron Barker (musician and Hall of Fame songwriter) • John Cafferty (of The Beaver Brown Band) • Kevin Chalfant (of 707, The Storm, and Journey) • Daughtry • Gavin Degraw • Randall Hall (of Lynyrd Skynyrd) • David Jenkens (of Pablo Cruise) • Chris Ledoux • Alex Ligertwood (of Santana) • Gary Morris • Hootie and the Blowfish • Michael Martin Murphy • Henry Paul (formerly of Black Hawk) Sports champions, including: • Matt Bahr • Jane Blalock • Larry Brown • Brant Boyer • Scott Hamilton • Billy Kidd • Jim Lonborg • Chris McCarron • Jay Miller • Jim Palmer • Gale Sayers • Wayne Wong And, of course, a host of rodeo champions, cowboys, ranchers, artists working in all mediums, and great people from all walks of life. Other honors include: • Selected as the sculptor at the 2000 Super Bowl for the Larry Brown Foundation. • Featured artist at the Days of ‘47 Utah Heritage Art Show, 2000 • Commissioned to sculpt the six-time Labrador Retriever field trial champion and the Female Labrador Retriever Field Trials World Champion, owned by Fred Kampo, Oshkosh, Wisconsin • Designed and sculpted many awards, personal tributes, and memorials such as the Huntsville Town Veterans Memorial Monument. • Honored as one of Utah’s Most Fabulous People by Utah Valley magazine, 2012 He has also been featured in a host of magazines, such as: • Cowboy Magazine • Ranch & Reata • Range Magazine • Rodeo News • Western Horseman • Western Writers of America Roundup Magazine • Saddlebag Dispatches Footnote: I am frequently ask the question as to where I get my inspiration. My inspiration is drawn from a number things, My girls, parents, family, grand kids, friends, animals, other artists, the great outdoors, life experiences and stories I’ve heard just to name a few.Rather than creating just a well done work of art, I want my work to tell a story, something people can relate to. Things that inspire, evoke emotion, and arouse the imagination, I want my work to mean something, something that can be talked about and shared. I like my work to also be educational,whether it is from an artistic, anatomy, historical or human interest aspect. I strive to encompass and portray the emotions, feeling and expressions in every work I create.Read more

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Native American Navajo Wide Ruins Textile, by Annie Tsosie, Ca 1970's, #1108B

Native American Navajo Chinle textile, by Annie Tsosie, Ca 1970's, #1108B Description: #1108B Native American Navajo Wide Ruins Textile, by Annie Tsosie, Ca 1970's, Please note that because of the rug size, the snap is showing only 1/4 of the piece. If you are interested in the piece, please let me know and I will try and get a whole shot for you. Dimension: 76" x 56" Condition: Excellent for its age. Some background on Anniie Tsosie: (FEBRUARY 2, 2011) Annie Mike Tsosie, 78, passed away on Friday, Jan. 28, 2011. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 3, at Tse Bii Osteel Bible Church in Whitecone. Interment will follow at the Indian Wells Community Cemetery. Annie was born April 15, 1932, in Whitecone/Mike Springs to James and Susie Mike. She was a homemaker all her life, and wove rugs to support her family. She was happily married for 42 years, and was a mother and grandma to many children. She enjoyed going to her grandkids’ basketball games. Annie was full of love and showed you with a big hug every time she greeted you. She opened her doors to anybody who needed help. She supported all her church activities at Tse Bii Otseel Bible Church. Survivors included her husband, Ben Tsosie; four children, Kenneth Parker, Julius Tsosie, Julia Tsosie and Glen Tsosie, all of Whitecone and Indian Wells; five sisters and three brothers; and numerous nephews, nieces and cousins. She was preceded in death by her parents, James and Susie Mike; a daughter, Evelyn Williams; a sister and two brothers. A Brief Social History of Navajo Weaving and a bit of historical context for a popular contemporary collectible There is an ageless beauty to Navajo weaving. Navajo weaving's are many things to people. Above all else, Navajo weaving's are masterworks, regardless of whose criteria of art is used to judge them. They are evocative, timeless portraits which, like all good art, transcend time and space. Navajo weaving has captured the imagination of many not only because they are beautiful, well-woven textiles but also because they so accurately mirror the social and economic history of Navajo people. Succinctly, Navajo women wove their life experiences into the pieces. Navajo people tell us they learned to weave from Spider Woman and that the first loom was of sky and earth cords, with weaving tools of sunlight, lightning, white shell, and crystal. Anthropologists speculate Navajos learned to weave from Pueblo people by 1650. There is little doubt Pueblo weaving was already influenced by the Spanish by the time they shared their weaving skills with Navajo people. Spanish influence includes the substitution of wool for cotton, the introduction of indigo (blue) dye, and simple stripe patterning. Besides the "manta" (a wider-than-long wearing blanket), Navajo weavers also made a tunic-like dress, belts, garters, hair ties, men's shirts, breech cloths, and a "serape-style" wearing blanket. These blankets were longer-than-wide and were patterned in brown, blue and white stripes and terraced lines. For more than a century, the products of Navajo looms were probably identical to those of their Pueblo teachers, but by the end of the 1700s Navajo weaving began its divergence. While Pueblo weavers remained conservative, Navajo weavers learned that wefts did not need to be passed through all the warps each time, but rather, by stopping at whatever point they wished they could create patterning other than horizontal bands. These "pauses" in Navajo weaving are often seen as "lazy-lines" (diagonal lines across the horizontal wefts) in finished pieces. By 1800, weavers were using this technique to create terraced lines and discrete design elements. Navajo weavers also demonstrated more willingness to use color than their Pueblo teachers. Spanish documents describing the Southwest in the early 18th century mention Navajo weaving skills. By the 1700's Navajo weaving was an important trade item to the Pueblos and Plains Indian people. In 1844, Santa Fe Trail traveler Josiah Gregg reported, "a singular species of blanket, known as the Serape Navajo which is of so close and dense a texture that it will frequently hold water almost equal to gum-elastic cloth. It is therefore highly prized for protection against the rains. Some of the finer qualities are often sold among the Mexicans as high as fifty or sixty dollars each." Blankets were traded great distances as evidenced by their appearance in Karl Bodmer's 1833 painting of a Piegan Blackfoot man (Montana) wearing what appears to be a first-phase Chief's blanket or an 1845 sketch of Cheyenne at Bent's Fort (Colorado) wearing striped blankets. Historic photographs illustrate that the desirability of blankets increased with the 19th century. Closer and more frequent trading partners included the Utes, Apaches, Comanche’s, and Pueblos. The Spanish or Mexicans had never been able to reach a lasting peace with the Navajo. When Mexico ceded the Southwest to the United States in 1848, the "Navajo Problem" was also inherited. With a pronounced resolve, Kit Carson led a "Scorched Earth" campaign in 1863–4, destroying food caches, herds and orchards, ending in 8000 Navajo people surrendering. They were marched hundreds of miles to an arid, barren reservation, Bosque Redondo, at Fort Sumner in eastern NM. For five years the people endured incarceration with shortages of supplies, food, and water. Their culture changed dramatically during this period, not least in weaving. To substitute for their lost flocks, annuities were paid which included cotton string, commercially-manufactured natural- and aniline-dyed yarns as well as manufactured cloth and blankets. These lessened the Navajo people's reliance on their own loom products. In 1867, four thousand Spanish-made blankets were distributed to the Navajos as part of their annuity payment. The combination of widespread availability of yarns and cloth and the influence of the Spanish Saltillo designs were probably a direct inspiration in the dramatic shift in weaving during the Bosque Redondo years, from the stripes and terraced patterns of the Classic period to the serrate or diamond style of the Transitional period. It is testimony to the resiliency of Navajo culture that a period of internment could produce a robust period of change and continuity in weaving. In 1868, the Navajo were allowed to return to their beloved mesas and canyons. In exchange for their return they promised to cease aggression against neighboring peoples, and to settle and become farmers. Reservation life brought further dramatic changes to Navajo culture, including a growing reliance on American civilization and its products. The sale of weaving's in the next thirty years would provide an essential vehicle for economic change from barter to cash. Annuity goods included yarns, wool cards, indigo dye, aniline dyes, and various kinds of factory woven cloth. Skirts and blouses made of manufactured cloth replaced the woven two-piece blanket dress. Manufactured Pendleton blankets displaced hand-woven mantas and shoulder blankets so that by the 1890's, there was relatively little need for loom products in Navajo society. US government-licensed traders began to establish themselves on the new Navajo Reservation. Whatever their motivation, adventure or commerce, the traders became the chief link between the Navajo and the non-Indian world. Trading posts exchanged goods for Navajo products such as piñon nuts, wool, sheep, jewelry, baskets, and rugs. While wool and sheep were important to Navajo people for weaving and meat, they were also important to the economy beyond the Reservation. Wool was in great demand in the industrialized eastern US for coats, upholstery, and other products. Traders bought wool by the pound and sold it to wool brokers in Albuquerque and Las Vegas, New Mexico. The sheep purchased by traders were herded to the nearest rail head and on to the slaughterhouses. The herds grew substantially and it became more profitable for Navajo people to sell wool rather than utilize it in weaving. The railroad reached Gallup, NM in 1882, establishing a tangible connection between the Navajos and the wider market, with the traders acting as middlemen. The completion of the railroad signaled the closing of the American Frontier which, in turn, stimulated a nationwide interest in collecting American Indian art. The railroad made travel to the vast reaches of the west easier and thus opened the area for tourists. The traders recognized these new markets and began to influence weaving by paying better prices for weaving's they thought more attractive to non-Indian buyers. This new market, coupled with the Navajo's decline in use of their hand woven products, infused new life into Navajo textile arts. By the 1880s, trading posts were well established on the Navajo Reservation, and traders encouraged weaving of floor rugs and patterns using more muted colors which they thought would appeal to the non-Indian market. By 1920, many regional styles of Navajo weaving developed around trading posts. These rugs are often known by the area's trading post's name. The history of Navajo weaving continues; over the past century, Navajo weaving has flourished, maintaining its importance as a vital native art to the present day. Virtually all the nineteenth and twentieth-century styles of blankets and rugs are still woven, and new styles continue to appear. ________________________________________ Thanks to Bruce Bernstein, former director, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe originally appeared in The Collector’s Guide to Santa Fe and Taos - Volume 11 ---------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavDescription:Read more

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Western Artist Chet Culp, "Navajo Rug Weaver", Oil Painting on Masonite

Western Artist Chet Culp, "Navajo Rug Weaver" 884. Description: Western Artist, Chet Culp, Navajo Rug Weaver, Oil Painting on Masonite. Ca. 1976, Colorful signed original oil on Masonite depicting a Navajo rug weaver. Culp is a noted southwest artist from Tucson. Dimensions: 30"x 24" (39 x 33 w/ frame) Condition: Very Good for its age. ------- “Chester Culp: It is said that to be a great artist you must have experienced many things. This being the case, Chet Culp more than qualifies as his life reads like a story book. He went from a Private in the Army to a Major in the Air Force with 10,000 flying hours and 34 different awards and decorations. He has been a building contractor, senior engineer in the space effort, art instructor, author, mining superintendent and consultant, athlete and coach of many sports, worked in 15 movies and is a member of the Screen Actors Guild, spent seven years of his life in foreign countries and traveled around the world there times. He paints in the vivid modern colors that weren’t available to the old masters and his westerns always tell a story. Most of his works are made without the help of a photo, model, or actual scene but as he says “Right out of my mind.” In recent years he has averaged about twenty oil portraits per year which he was commissioned to do. One subject while posing for her picture said that Culp’s eyes were hypnotic as he seemed to see right through you while trying to obtain ones inner self in the portrait. Quite often his backgrounds will show the life story of the subject such as the one of a social worker wherein he painted over one hundred heads of people in the background in addition to a look of compassion in the eyes of the subject. You cannot compare Culp to Picaso because he paints modern realism. His work is refreshing and you find that he has taken something of the past, whether it be just 10 minutes ago or 1,000 years and given it to the future. His oils move the great depth and understanding of an intellect for his mind must work like a very efficient computer that can retain information as well as use it to advantage. His works will be thoroughly enjoyed for many years to come which must be the reason that people are beginning to add his paintings to their collections. “ Dean Casper "Comment: Culp has often said that anyone can paint who is willing to practice, can concentrate, and has at least some powers of observation. He has proved this any number of times by making artists of those persons who thought they had not talent whatsoever. Many of his students during the three years he has taught in Tucson have made amazing progress. "Read more

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Western Artist, Ron Stewart, “Cry Vengence”, Water Color Painting, #759

759. Description: Western Artist, Ron Stewart (1941-), “Cry Vengence” Watercolor. Signed lower left corner, fully framed with small Remarque in lower right of mat showing what happens when the target is found. This painting is a result of a photo trip to the Pinedale Rendezvous area near Jackson Hole where Ron photographed every year with Frank McCarthy. Dimensions: height 27 in; width 32.5 in Condition: Very good condition, and conservation glass added to the piece. --------- Additional Ron Stewart Paintings can be found at:https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16492699 and his Bronze work can be found at:https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16131018 ----------- Ron Stewart is a painter and sculptor of western, historical, wildlife, and animal subjects. He was born in Brooklyn, NY. In the over-crowded field of contemporary western artists, Ron Stewart’s professional achievements have made his work familiar to a wide range of discriminating collectors. Ron is among those who is tied hard and fast to the quality of painting and the historical fidelity of the Old West Masters. The refined artistic abilities, in watercolor, oil, and bronze, are truly distinguished, but Ron brings more to his work than just the technical competence of a western illustrator. The Ron Stewart hallmark is the representation of the mood and the atmosphere appropriate to whatever he approaches. His paintings breathe life into the dusty pages of western history, be it the bawl of longhorn cattle, the war whoop of the red men, or the mountain man in his wilderness solitude. Ron has received awards multiple times at the competitive Death Valley Invitational (5), the George Phippen Memorial (3), and Best of Show, and Best Watercolor at the Pikes Peak National Invitational Show (2), and he also received numerous awards at the Western Artist of America, including three gold medals in Watercolor, two Silver medals in Watercolor, and one Silver medal in Oil, and one Silver medal in Bronze. His work can be seen at Mountain Trail Galleries in Jackson, Wyoming; Signature Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona, and Santa Fe, NM; Long coat Gallery, Ruidoso, NM; Sanders Gallery, Tucson, AZ; and the Culturalpatina Gallery in Fairfax, VA, which has the largest collection of his work in the world. His life was chronicled in Artists of the Rockies and the Golden West in winter of 1979, Ron and his wife Sharon have resided in Arizona for the last 45 years. Stewart has exhibited throughout the West in juried and group shows, collecting a variety of top awards for his works, including numerous gold and silver medals in oil, watercolor, bronze and drawing. International collections include locations in England, France, Germany, Italy, Denmark, Spain, the Philippines, and Japan. ----------------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavDescription:Read more

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Historic Nomad Turkmen Cherjew Village Children’s Ceremonial Garment

Historic Turkmen Cherjew Village Children's Ceremonial Garment 922. Description: Historic Nomad Turkmen Cherjew Village Children’s Ceremonial Garment, Ca 1930’s . Vintage Traditional Nomad child ceremonial garment. The garment is decorated by hand with handmade tassels, metals, coins, silver, shells, beads and other ornaments to protect against the evil eye. Front & Back are almost the same, heavily adorned with all these materials. It is a one of a kind piece of art for home decoration and/or wall hanging. Dimensions: Height: 20” by 18” Wide at shoulders. Condition: Very good condition which is estimated to be around Ca 1930's. Some information on the Turkmen culture and people. The Turkmen people have traditionally been nomads and equestrians, and even today after the fall of the USSR attempts to urbanize the Turkmen have not been very successful. They never really formed a coherent nation or ethnic group until they were forged into one by Joseph Stalin in the 1930's. Rather they are divided into clans, and each clan has its own dialect and style of dress. Turkmen are famous for making Turkmen rugs, often mistakenly called Bukhara rugs in the West. These are elaborate and colorful rugs, and these too help indicate the distinction between the various Turkmen clans. The Turkmen are Sunni Muslims but they, like most of the region's nomads, adhere to Islam rather loosely and combine Islam with pre-Islamic animist spirituality. The Turkmen do indeed tend to be spiritual but are by no means militantly religious. A Turkmen can be identified anywhere by the traditional "telpek" hats, which are large black sheepskin hats that resemble afros. The national dress: men wear high, shaggy sheepskin hats and red robes over white shirts. Women wear long sack-dresses over narrow trousers (the pants are trimmed with a band of embroidery at the ankle). Female headdresses usually consist of silver jewelry. Bracelets and brooches are set with semi-precious stones. Language: Outside the capital, the national language of Turkmen is the most widely encountered. In Ashgabat, it would be hard to find a person who did not speak Russian, however with recent efforts to revive the ancient culture of Turkmenistan, Turkmen is quickly regaining its place as the chief language of the state. Two significant figures in Turkmen literature are the poets Magtymguly Pyragy and Mämmetweli Kemine. Turkmen music is very similar to Khorasani music.( Source Wikipedia) ----------- Some information on the Evil Eye Follows: ----------- The evil eye is a curse believed to be cast by a malevolent glare, usually given to a person when they are unaware. Many cultures believe that receiving the evil eye will cause misfortune or injury.Talismans created to protect against the evil eye are also frequently called "evil eyes". The idea expressed by the term causes many different cultures to pursue protective measures against it. The concept and its significance vary widely among different cultures, primarily in West Asia. The idea appears several times in translations of the Old Testament. It was a widely extended belief among many Mediterranean and Asian tribes and cultures. Charms and decorations with eye-like symbols known as nazars, which are used to repel the evil eye are a common sight across Turkey, Greece, Albania, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Southern Italy (Naples), the Levant, and Afghanistan and have become a popular choice of souvenir with tourists. (Source: Wikipedia)Read more

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Native American Maricopa Poly chrome Pottery Olla #36

Native American Maricopa Poly chrome pottery olla. 36. Description: NATIVE AMERICAN MARICOPA Poly chrome POTTERY OLLA, red on buff, the slender body with everted lip, painted with swags, bands of lines, and stylized leaves. Condition Report: Very good undamaged condition, with light signs of wear and a few burnt areas to the surface, typical of the firing process for these vessels. Provenance: Collection of the late John and Lil Palmer, Purcellville, VA. Ex-collection of Leonard Landis, Harman, WV. Dimensions: 15" H. Date: Circa 1900. The following is a direct quote from an appraisal done by Ramona Morris of Delaplane, VA on May 29, 2002. "Red fine line geometric and broader leaf shaped designs on buff background. Tall oval shaped with flaring neck. Storage jars of this size are extremely rare from this tribe. An effigy example from a private collection, possibly by the same hand, can be seen n North American Indian Art, by Peter T. and Jill I., Furst 1982, Plate 14." A History of Pueblo Pottery: “Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo’s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated—most frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqué. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo’s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome—a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.” (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona) ---------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavRead more

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Naga Textile : Authentic Konyak Naga Woman's Natural Body Cloth with

Naga Textile Authentic Konyak Naga Woman's Natural Body Cloth 658, Authentic Konyak Naga Woman's natural body cloth with embroidered patches. The piece is 64 inches long and 34 inches wide. Some ware, but overall in excellent condition for its use and age which is estimated to be early to mid 20th century. Please note that the designation Authentic means that the piece was made by the Nagas and used by them in their actual ceremonies and not made for tourists. Nagaland has a rich diversity of ethnic groups, languages and religions. More than 80% of the population lives in small, isolated villages and practice their own rituals and traditions that have been existing since centuries. The Nagas are said to belong to the Indo-Mongoloid stock, a race whose presence was first noted ten centuries before Christ, at the time of the compilation of the Vedas. The Nagas are mostly Christians. Naga Features: The Nagas are usually medium sized. The nose is flat, eyes curved, complexion fair, and hair straight. Men are muscular and women are usually short. One unique feature of the Nagas is that they wear conical red headgear decorated with wild boar canine teeth and white black Hornbill feathers, the spear with the shaft decorated with red black hairs and the unique dao with broad blade and long handle. Both men and women wear traditional Naga jewelry. Naga shawls are very famous among the tribes. Tattooing is customary among the tribes. Nagaland Culture The tribes of Nagaland are unique in their culture and traditions. The tribes are excellent and skilled craftsmen. Naga tribes are known for being hard working and laborious. They are known for making exquisite bamboo and cane products, weaving and wood carving. The Nagas are expert in basketry, weaving, woodcarving, pottery and metal work. Agriculture is the main occupation of the people. Rice, millet and Taro potato are grown by the people. The tribes of Nagaland are very fond of dance and music. Music forms an essential parts of their lives. There are different traditional dances and music of the different tribes. The music of is characterized by folk songs and music accentuated by traditional instruments. People of Nagaland are also famous for celebrating numerous seasonal fairs and festivals. All the tribes celebrate their own distinct festivals with dance and music. The most important festivals celebrated by the tribes include Sekrenyi, Moatsu Mong, Suhkruhnye, Bushu, Yemshe, and Metumniu among others. The food of the Naga tribe consist of rice, millet, vegetables, fish, meat, Naga chilly and chutney. Nagaland Village System: The tribes live mainly in villages. For the Nagas family is the most important institution. Women are treated equally with men. Nagas are traditionally and tribally organized with a strong warrior tradition. Head hunting is an important aspect of the people. Most of the houses of the Nagas have skull displaying their warrior qualities. Different Tribes of Nagaland: Nagaland is home to some 16 different kinds of tribes with distinct and fascinating cultures. Each of the Naga tribe is divided into as many as twenty clans. The Nagas speak 60 different dialects. The prominent tribes are Angami, Ao, Chakhesang, Chang, Khiamniungan, Konyak, Lotha, Pochury, Phom, Poumai, Rongmei Naga, Rengma, Sangtam, Sema, Mao and Zeliang among many others. The languages of the Nagas may vary from Angami-Pochury, Ao, Kukish, Sal, Tangkhul and Zeme branches of Tibeto Burman. Some important tribes are: Angami Naga: The Angami Nagas are one of the major tribes of Nagaland. The Angamis mainly celebrate the Sekrenyi festival. They are basically hill people and depend on agriculture for their mode of livelihood. 98 % of the Angamis are Christians. Ao Naga: Ao Nagas are another major tribes in Nagaland. They reside mainly in Tsula to Tsurang in Mokokchung district. The Ao Nagas are known for the celebration of different harvest festivals. The Aos are primarily Christians. Chang: Changs are one of the recognized Scheduled Tribes in India. The traditional territory of the Chang lies in the Central Tuensang district. About 99 % of the Changs are Christians. They speak the Chang language and the Chang people are very fond of music and dance. They celebrate Christmas, Naknyu Lem, Poang Lem, Jeinyu Leam and so many other festivals with fanfare and gaiety. Konyak: Konyak have the largest populations among the Nagas. They are found in the Mon district of Nagaland. They are famous for their tattoos all over their faces and hands. Lotha: Lotha is also a major Naga tribe and reside in the Wokha district. They are popular for traditional dance and folk songs. Sumi: Sumi Nagas are one of the major Naga tribes. They mainly inhabit in the Zunheboto district. 99 % of the Sumis are Christians. Tuluni and Ahuna are the most important festivals of the Sumis. Yimchunger: Yimchunger is a minor Naga group. Metmneo festival is celebrated by the Yimchunge people. Khiamniungan: Khiamniungan is comparatively a minor Naga group. They mainly reside in the Tuensang district in Nagaland. Miu festival and Tsokum festival are the most important festivals celebrated by this tribal group. (Source: India on line) Tangkhul: Tangkhul is a Naga tribe living in the Indo-Burma border area occupying the Ukhrul district in Manipur, India and the Somra Tangkhul hills (Somra tract) in Upper Burma. Despite this international border, many Tangkhul have continued to regard themselves as "one nation".[1] Further reading Stirn, Aglaja & Peter van Ham. The Hidden world of the Naga: Living Traditions in Northeast India. London: Prestel. Oppitz, Michael, Thomas Kaiser, Alban von Stockhausen & Marion Wettstein. 2008. Naga Identities: Changing Local Cultures in the Northeast of India. Gent: Snoeck Publishers. Kunz, Richard & Vibha Joshi. 2008. Naga A Forgotten Mountain Region Rediscovered. Basel: Merian. Alban von Stockhausen: Imag (in) ing the Nagas: The Pictorial Ethnography of Hans-Eberhard Kauffmann and Christoph von FÌ_rer-Haimendorf. Arnoldsche, Stuttgart 2014, ISBN 978-3-89790-412-5.(Source: Times of India)Read more

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