Cultural Patina

Cultural Patina provides a platform for people to access global high quality art, easily. Since their establishment in 2014 owner Dennis has managed to collect a plethora of pottery, sculptures, textiles, jewellery from across the globe and the second largest accumulation of original Naga Indian art in US.

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Objects "Cultural Patina"

Western Art : Ron Stewart Water Color, "Stage to Santa Fe", Ron Stewart

Western Art 672. Description: Signed Ron Stewart "Stage To Santa Fe" watercolor painting. Hand signed in the lower left hand corner with a very detailed painted remark in the right hand corner that shows the stage depot. A really nice touch to the overall composition of the piece. Dimensions: Frame measures 32.5 x 25.5" and the exposed area of the painting is 19.5 x 29.5 ". Condition: Excellent Condition for its age. ----------- Additional Ron Stewart Paintings can be found at: https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16492699 and his Bronze work can be found at: https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16131018 ----------- Ron Stewart is a painter and sculptor of western, historical, wildlife, and animal subjects. He was born in Brooklyn, NY. In the over-crowded field of contemporary western artists, Ron Stewart's professional achievements have made his work familiar to a wide range of discriminating collectors. Ron is among those who is tied hard and fast to the quality of painting and the historical fidelity of the Old West Masters. The refined artistic abilities, in watercolor, oil, and bronze, are truly distinguished, but Ron brings more to his work than just the technical competence of a western illustrator. The Ron Stewart hallmark is the representation of the mood and the atmosphere appropriate to whatever he approaches. His paintings breathe life into the dusty pages of western history, be it the bawl of longhorn cattle, the war whoop of the red men, or the mountain man in his wilderness solitude. Ron has received awards multiple times at the competitive Death Valley Invitational (5), the George Phippen Memorial (3), and Best of Show, and Best Watercolor at the Pikes Peak National Invitational Show (2), and he also received numerous awards at the Western Artist of America, including three gold medals in Watercolor, two Silver medals in Watercolor, and one Silver medal in Oil, and one Silver medal in Bronze. His work can be seen at Mountain Trail Galleries in Jackson, Wyoming; Signature Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona, and Santa Fe, NM; Long coat Gallery, Ruidoso, NM; and Sanders Gallery, Tucson, AZ. His life was chronicled in Artists of the Rockies and the Golden West in winter of 1979, Stewart has exhibited throughout the West in juried and group shows, collecting a variety of top awards for his works, including numerous gold and silver medals in oil, watercolor, bronze and drawing. International collections include locations in England, France, Germany, Italy, Denmark, Spain, the Philippines, and Japan. View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavRead more

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Western Bronze Sculpture, by Renowned Western Artist, Jeff Wolf, Entitled

Western Bronze Sculpture, by Renowned Western Artist, Jeff Wolf, Entitled "The Serenade", Limited Edition, 3 of 10, 1010 Description: “The Serenade” was inspired by romance. This work depicts a young brave who has fallen in love with a beautiful maiden. Seated on a high rock, he sends his love down through his music to the waiting ears and heart to the one he is hopeful of making his wife. (Note: Currently available) Best of show and Indian Heritage award and people’s choice, Western Art Round-up, Winnemucca, NV Dimensions: 22"L x 25"H x 17"W, approximately 80 pounds Condition: Excellent, available 3 of 10 Provenance: Jeff Wolf; 2016 Biography of Jeff Wolf and Achievements Follow: Persistence makes perfect: The trail to the top of the Western Art world is steep and narrow. It is littered with obstacles, beset with sheer drop-offs, and hindered by unexpected twists and turns. Sculptor Jeff Wolf has ridden that trail for more than twenty-five years and reached heights few artists attain. Along the way he has placed bronzes in prominent museums and permanent exhibits, in prestigious private collections, and on display in public venues. He has been bestowed with honors and awards, recognized in juried competitions, and called upon to teach and demonstrate. Jeff made—and continues—the journey on a mount called persistence. He has lived by the old cowboy maxim that it doesn’t matter how many times you get bucked off, but what counts is getting back on—brushing off adversity, dusting off disappointment, climbing back in the saddle and continuing the journey. While the ride can be a lonely one, it is not a ride Jeff makes alone. Riding with him along the way are talent and skill, creativity and vision, experience and expertise. And, of course, persistence—keeping ever after the quest to not only depict the West in art, but to capture the emotion, the motivation, the underlying aesthetics of ordinary life and extraordinary events. Saddling up; The importance of persistence was instilled in Jeff at an early age. Jeff excelled in everything he put his mind to except school. Dyslexia—virtually undiscovered at the time—made reading nearly impossible. But that didn’t stop him from graduating from high school and attending three years of college on scholarships, and eventually teaching himself to read. In high school, Jeff became a champion livestock judge and earned a silver medal at the National FFA convention, earning what was at the time the highest score ever recorded—98 out of 100—in the cattle grading division. He was also a Champion rodeo cowboy in High School, college, and a top competitor in professional rodeo, competed mainly in the bareback and bull riding events, as well as saddle bronc riding, team roping, and steer wrestling. Through it all, art sustained him. From an early age he was compelled to create. “My gift chose me, I didn’t choose it,” he says. Jeff’s story as a sculptor started at age five when he received modeling clay for Christmas. His hands and heart went to work to mold into the clay the world he saw around him. An early work, a buffalo carved from a bar of soap, earned his first recognition when published in the pages of Western Horseman magazine. With a constant driving force from within, combined with a wild imagination and insatiable desire to learn and discover, Jeff’s childhood and youth would inform his art. Along with his gift of creation he was given, in his words, “a great gift of upbringing.” Raised on a ranch in the mouth of Goshen Canyon, located south of Utah Lake, he had both the opportunities and responsibilities of any ranch kid. “I lived among the local wildlife, learned the art of handling cattle and horses, and had the fortunate opportunity to listen to the stories of real old-time cowboys, memories of which remain ingrained in my mind.” Adding to the fascination, Wolf says, was “spending most of my days, when not working on the ranch, running wild and free in the mountains, along the creeks, building hideouts, and watching wildlife or hunting.” Even anatomy lessons were in the offing. Jeff’s grandfather owned and operated a small meat packing company, which gave Jeff the opportunity to see firsthand animal anatomy from the inside out. “Grandpa used to take the front or rear leg of a beef carcass and move it as if it were walking and explain how each muscle and every bone made that movement possible.” This led Jeff to study every movement a person or animal made, trying to decipher the bones and muscles working to make that movement possible. “I developed the habit when riding for cows to ride behind another rider and watch the horse and rider as they moved as one in harmony. A nice moving horse and a true horseman is a symphony of visual music.” This curiosity and fascination with anatomy turned Jeff into a recognized master of capturing motion in sculpture. And there were other lessons to learn: Jeff says, “I know firsthand what it feels like to climb down onto the back of a bull or bucking horse, know the rush adrenaline and the explosion from the chute. I know what it’s like to sit for hour watching mule deer feed, coming so close that I could feel their breath on my hand. I have experienced the fear and drama of a stampede. And I have lived in the wild, providing for myself among the ghosts of Indians.” From his father, Jeff learned the ways of cattle and horses. “I remember one experience as if it were today,” he says. “Dad and I rode up on a cow and calf who hadn’t seen a human being all summer. She was one of those who enjoyed hiding out in country where she wasn’t easy to find. We saw each other at about the same time. Her head came up and her ears came forward, moving back and forth determining which route to take for escape. Dad said, ‘Let’s just let her look at us for a while.’ As we sat there, he explained every thought that was running through that cow’s mind by the way she her ears worked back and forth, the short, soft mooing sounds she made to her calf, her posture, and the way she looked away then back at us. “Then Dad and I rode closer, stopping every few feet so as not to pose a threat, and from a direction that would move her in the intended direction. All this, to avoid a wild chase and the possibility of losing her altogether. Within half an hour we, the cow, and the calf walked off the mountain and into the holding pasture any mishap. These are the kinds of things that have the greatest impact on my work today.” Riding out:Throughout childhood and youth, Jeff’s gift refuse to let him rest. He had to constantly be creating something. Persistence kept him sculpting, even as other interests competed for time and attention. “I didn’t sculpt a lot some years but I did keep after it. I seemed to know from my earliest years that sculpting would be my ultimate life and livelihood and I was in no hurry to get there. I was having too much fun experiencing life.” After retiring from professional rodeo, Jeff’s desire to sculpt gradually increased, fed by those very experiences. “If I haven’t personally lived the scene, I imagine myself in the time, place, and moment and visualize what it would have been like to actually be a participant. This might involve hours of research until that image or scene is fully and clearly formed in my mind. The concept then become like a photograph imprinted in my consciousness, becomes a vivid image and begs to be given life.” But three-dimensional photographic-type depictions of those scenes is not what Jeff strives for in his art. “For me,” Jeff says, “art goes far beyond mere depiction or precise rendering. I feel that true art should tell a story, put you in a place or a moment in time that stimulates the imagination and arouses the soul. It’s not about the subject matter, concept, or idea; it’s about discovery and stretching the boundaries of creativity. I strive to sculpt an experience. This is what makes me tick. Discovering how mass and negative space can be used and manipulated to become a vital part of the design. Using mirroring, and mimicking shapes to keep the eye roving around the subject to tell a story. Years of devotion to the study of art principles, combined with the determination to produce works that are worthy of the title of fine art is the motivational drive behind my work. That’s is the visual tune I dance to.” It’s not an easy dance to learn. It takes passion. Perseverance. And persistence. But those qualities, combined with an imaginative and creative mind pay off for Jeff. Then, it’s time for the work of the mind and heart to guide the hands of the sculptor. “Once the physical work begins, the piece often times takes on its own personality. I then become merely the tool that gives life to the dictation of the piece. Those times produce my finest works. “Finding ways to create the illusion of life in something like wet hair, rushing water, speed of movement, drama of action, sheer fabric flowing around the beauty of the female figure, wind whipping a mane of a stallion, or a reflection in water in a bas relief is the stimulation behind my work,” Jeff says. “I work to compose the design so that every aspect has purpose. Every line leads to another, every plane reflects light or casts a shadow for depth and dimension. Balance points create harmony and mass builds strength and stability to create a realistic illusion of movement. The synergy of opposing forces coming together and pulling apart allows me to create a greater effect, a stronger vision. My feeling is that every work I create has its own distinct personality and character. Therefore, it requires its own texture or multiple textures unique to itself as well as the composition and design that best reflects the story that is being presented. “A well-rendered pair of wrinkled and cracked work boots with worn soles and tattered laces, lying side by side as if just taken off the tired feet of the owner or even discarded will form a picture in the viewer’s mind. Some may see only a pair of boots. But others will see the life of the man who wore them— tired and wrinkled like the boots, exhausted from a hard day's labor and glad to get those old boots off his feet. Some may see dad or grandpa. Some may see a farmer plowing a field behind two mules. It really doesn’t matter what the viewer envisions, it’s the fact that a vision has been created. That is what I strive for in every work I create.” Riding on: And so Jeff Wolf went to work. And he worked. Then worked some more to blaze his own trail to the artistic heights. Making the climb, and maintaining the heights requires persistence. Over time, collectors become familiar with an artist’s background and reputation. But reputation only goes so far. If the work isn’t up to snuff, one can never expect to create or maintain demand with an inferior product. But Jeff’s persistence paid off. In 1990, art collector Ann Heckbert discovered Jeff’s sculpture at an art show in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Ann and her husband Jim, owner of Garret Gallery, approached Jeff about showing his work. By 1991, Jeff’s life as a professional sculptor was underway and has earned been his livelihood ever since. Jeff credits Jim and Ann for launching a career that has earned him a reputation as one of the finest western sculptors of our time. Jeff’s first national juried show, the George Phippen Memorial Art Show in Prescott, Arizona, earned the artist the three highest awards: Best of Show, Best in Category and People’s Choice. He has won or placed in practically every juried art show he has participated in since, and may be the only living sculptor to have won Best of Show and People’s Choice awards in six genres of Western art: Wildlife, Figural, Rodeo, Equine, Western, and Native American. Finally, while Jeff is well aware that gifts such as his are given to individuals, the trail to success isn’t one you ride alone. Persistence is often aided by the encouragement and assistance of others. He says, “The journey to the top would have been impossible if it weren’t for the help and support of family, friends, my collectors, admirers and especially my wife Jennifer.” Jeff also believes gifts are to be shared. So he now shares his talents and knowledge with fellow artists, students of the arts, and charitable foundations. He teaches workshops, lectures at schools, and sculpts at public events. Donations of time, talent, and art have generated over one million dollars for charitable causes. God-given talent, real life experience, insatiable desire to be the best, and persistence have immortally molded and cast forever the name Jeff Wolf into the world of Western art and sculpture. The portfolio of Jeff Wolf’s work is extensive, and his name is tied to some of the most prestigious collections, galleries, and museums. Persistence has placed his art in national and international collections including: • Simons Collection, Cayman Islands • Ryder Collection, Ryder Trucking • Renn and Marie Zaphiropoulos Collection (inventor of the color tube for television and, later, the developer of laser printing) • Meredith Hodges Collection and National Mule Museum, Loveland, Colorado • Mr. and Mrs. Robert Henderson • Jim Terry (former CEO of Coca-Cola) • Jack Williams (former president of Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines) • Elton Salinas (owner of Elton’s Clothier, Las Vegas, Nevada) • Richard and Carole Kreamer (Board of Directors, American Airlines) • David and Pam Furr (Gaston Law) • Jim and Ann Heckbert (Burg Simpson Law & Humble Ranch) • Steve and Mary Kay Larsen • Lori Wilkinson (Brown & Brown Insurance of Nevada, Waymark Insurance Services) • Richard Sanders (president of Kobalt Music Group) • Buck Taylor (artist and actor) • Jane Blalock (Hall of Fame Golfer) • Jim Palmer (Hall of Fame Baseball Player) Jeff has filled commissions for sculpture for: • Coca-Cola • Susan G. Koman Foundation • T.A.P.S. Foundation • Habitat for Humanity • American Lung Association • National Retriever Club and National Amateur Retriever Club • American Airlines • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation • American Bucking Bull, Inc. • Cistercian Preparatory School Hillary award • Rodeo Champions monument, Gooding ID • And several cities, corporate executives, farmers, ranchers, sportsmen, families, and friends. Jeff’s talent has introduced him to an array of TV, movie, and sports celebrities, including: • Kimberlin Brown • Dylan Bruno • Gordon Clapp • Lenny Clarke • Jeff Dunham, • Grant Goodeve • Chris Harrison • Dennis Haskins • Sandra Hess • Brad Johnson • Wendie Malick, • Ron Masak, • Marc McClure • Rob Moran • Eloise Mumford • Eric Christian Olsen • Jason Priestly • Perrey Reeves • James Sikking, • Buck Taylor • Steve Thomas • Michael Trucco. • John York • Ian Ziering Musicians, such as: • Aaron Barker (musician and Hall of Fame songwriter) • John Cafferty (of The Beaver Brown Band) • Kevin Chalfant (of 707, The Storm, and Journey) • Daughtry • Gavin Degraw • Randall Hall (of Lynyrd Skynyrd) • David Jenkens (of Pablo Cruise) • Chris Ledoux • Alex Ligertwood (of Santana) • Gary Morris • Hootie and the Blowfish • Michael Martin Murphy • Henry Paul (formerly of Black Hawk) Sports champions, including: • Matt Bahr • Jane Blalock • Larry Brown • Brant Boyer • Scott Hamilton • Billy Kidd • Jim Lonborg • Chris McCarron • Jay Miller • Jim Palmer • Gale Sayers • Wayne Wong And, of course, a host of rodeo champions, cowboys, ranchers, artists working in all mediums, and great people from all walks of life. Other honors include: • Selected as the sculptor at the 2000 Super Bowl for the Larry Brown Foundation. • Featured artist at the Days of ‘47 Utah Heritage Art Show, 2000 • Commissioned to sculpt the six-time Labrador Retriever field trial champion and the Female Labrador Retriever Field Trials World Champion, owned by Fred Kampo, Oshkosh, Wisconsin • Designed and sculpted many awards, personal tributes, and memorials such as the Huntsville Town Veterans Memorial Monument. • Honored as one of Utah’s Most Fabulous People by Utah Valley magazine, 2012 He has also been featured in a host of magazines, such as: • Cowboy Magazine • Ranch & Reata • Range Magazine • Rodeo News • Western Horseman • Western Writers of America Roundup Magazine • Saddlebag Dispatches Footnote: I am frequently ask the question as to where I get my inspiration. My inspiration is drawn from a number things, My girls, parents, family, grand kids, friends, animals, other artists, the great outdoors, life experiences and stories I’ve heard just to name a few. Rather than creating just a well done work of art, I want my work to tell a story, something people can relate to. Things that inspire, evoke emotion, and arouse the imagination, I want my work to mean something, something that can be talked about and shared. I like my work to also be educational, whether it is from an artistic, anatomy, historical or human interest aspect. I strive to encompass and portray the emotions, feeling and expressions in every work I create.Read more

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Wild Horses : Original Ron Stewart Oil, "Ponies for Warriors" Signed

Wild Horses 162. Description: This extraordinary Oil painting by Listed Artist Ron Stewart (1941-) entitled 'Ponies for Warriors'. Signed lower left: Ron Stewart @ (cyphers). Verso: titled. Dimensions: Size is 18 x 30 inches. Condition: Excellent Condition for its age. The piece was painted in 2014. ----------- Additional Ron Stewart Paintings can be found at:https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16492699 and his Bronze work can be found at:https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16131018 ----------- Ron Stewart is a painter and sculptor of western, historical, wildlife, and animal subjects. He was born in Brooklyn, NY. In the over-crowded field of contemporary western artists, Ron Stewart's professional achievements have made his work familiar to a wide range of discriminating collectors. Ron is among those who is tied hard and fast to the quality of painting and the historical fidelity of the Old West Masters. The refined artistic abilities, in watercolor, oil, and bronze, are truly distinguished, but Ron brings more to his work than just the technical competence of a western illustrator. The Ron Stewart hallmark is the representation of the mood and the atmosphere appropriate to whatever he approaches. His paintings breathe life into the dusty pages of western history, be it the bawl of longhorn cattle, the war whoop of the red men, or the mountain man in his wilderness solitude. Ron has received awards multiple times at the competitive Death Valley Invitational (5), the George Phippen Memorial (3), and Best of Show, and Best Watercolor at the Pikes Peak National Invitational Show (2), and he also received numerous awards at the Western Artist of America, including three gold medals in Watercolor, two Silver medals in Watercolor, and one Silver medal in Oil, and one Silver medal in Bronze. His work can be seen at Mountain Trail Galleries in Jackson, Wyoming; Signature Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona, and Santa Fe, NM; Long coat Gallery, Ruidoso, NM; Sanders Gallery, Tucson, AZ; and the Culturalpatina Gallery in Fairfax, VA. His life was chronicled in Artists of the Rockies and the Golden West in winter of 1979, Ron and his wife Sharon have resided in Arizona for the last 45 years. Stewart has exhibited throughout the West in juried and group shows, collecting a variety of top awards for his works, including numerous gold and silver medals in oil, watercolor, bronze and drawing. International collections include locations in England, France, Germany, Italy, Denmark, Spain, the Philippines, and Japan. ----------------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavDescription:Read more

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Asian Antique : Intricately Decorated Woman "Star Bib" From The Dao

Asian Antique 398.Complete and intricately decorated "Star Bib": hand loomed cotton cloth, applique, and aluminum attachments, from a woman, Dao Hong Tu Group, Ha Giang Province, Far Northern Mountains, Viet Nam, Mid to late 20th century. Women of the hill tribes of Southeast Asia wear their identity for all to see all day and every day. Every one of the garments they wear - pants or skirts, shirt, leggings, jacket, belt, turban, jewelry - is linked to their culture and their history. Although this is not always the case in communities close to urban centers, these examples are the exceptions that prove the rule. Without exception, the garb of the mountain groups is very modest. Almost of the Dao women wear a long jacket, split in front and one the sides. The bottom of the back panel has the designs that signify the group to which the woman belongs. This can be just a few animal or it can be a complex panel, often with a border of a dozen or more concentric squares. In the front, the woman has a garment to cover the chest if the jacket is not fully closed. Some have a chemise (sometimes also translated as undershirt or bra). As usual, the shape, construction, and decoration is specifically designated (with slight flexibility) for every woman in the group. This bib was made by the Dao Hong Tu in Ha Giang province, approximately 500 km from Hanoi. These are worn daily by Dao Hong Tu women and always decorated with metal or silver panels in the rectangular and flower shapes. PEOPLES OF VIET NAM AN INTRODUCTION Vietnam is a culturally diverse country that is the home to hundreds of local tribes. Over the last half century, anthropologists and the like have classified and reclassified these tribes into some 54 ethnic groups, each group possessing a distinct language and culture. The Kinh, who account for 87% of the country's population, live mainly in the Red River delta in the North, the coastal plains of the centre and the Mekong delta in the South. The remaining 13% of the population is made up of 53 minority groups, living mostly in the mountains stretching from the far north of the country to the Central Highlands in the south. Some of these groups (such as the Tay and the Thai have populations of over one million, although there are others such as the O Du and Ro Mam that number only in the hundreds. Each group expresses its own cultural identity through a range of communal activities, festivals and ceremonies. Linguistically, each of the 54 ethnic groups of Vietnam may be further classified into one of five language families: Austro - Asiatic (Viet Muong groups and Mon Khmer) Austronesian (Malayo - Polynesian) Thai - Kadai (Thai group and Kadai group) Sino - Tibetan (Sinotic group and Tibetan - Burman) HMONG - Dao All the ethnic groups in Vietnam share a common ethnographic history, originating from original groups living south of the Yangtze River. Segments of this early group dispersed southward and eastward to, what are now the islands now a part of Malaysia, Indonesia and Polynesia. Despite this migration, these groups have adopted their own characteristic cultures, different from any of the other Southeast Asian countries. Ethnic folklore is also varied: epics, tales and legends handed down as oral literature from generation to generation. The cultural traditions of the ethnic groups have enriched the overall common Vietnamese national heritage. THE DAO PEOPLE IN VIETNAM Starting around the 12th century, the Dao immigrated to Viet Nam from the provinces of Guang Dong, Guangxi and Fujian of China. Following many Vietnamese researchers, the Dao immigrated in Vietnam in about 15th century. However, much of the immigration happened after 1800, in the wake of a brutal campaign against them by the Han Chinese. The reason behind this campaign was the unwillingness of the Dao to abandon their culture and embrace the culture of the dominant Han Chinese. The Dao have other names, the most common being Zhou and Yao. The Dao people have the ninth largest population of the 54 ethnic groups in Vietnam about 473,945 almost one million Dao, second in number only to China (which has around 5 million). The Dao people also live in Laos, Thailand, Myanmar and Cambodia. Over time, they spread over the northern mountains of Vietnam (Cao Bang, Bac Kan, Lang Son, Thai Nguyen, Ha Giang, Tuyen Quang, Lai Chau, Yen Bai, Lao Cai provinces) into some midland provinces (Phu Tho, Vinh Phuc, Vinh Phuc, Hoa Binh) and to some of the coastline of northern Vietnam. They live mainly by raising animals, agriculture and hunting animals. In Vietnam, according to Mrs. Ban Thi Tu, a researcher, the Dao divide themselves into two branches: 1st branch: 1. Dao Dai Ban (In Vietnam, there are many different subgroups of the Dao (e.g. Dao Do)- -Red Dao 2. Dao Tieu Ban (Dao Tien)-Coin Dao 3. Dao Quan Chet - Tight Trouser Dao 2nd branch: 1. Dao Thanh Y 2. Dao Quan Trang-White - Trouser Dao 3. Dao Ao Dai (Man Den) This categorization is based on linguistic differences as opposed to visual discrepancies. They all speak the Dao language, which belongs to the Hmong - Dao language family. However, the subgroups still have some differences in their dialects. They use adapted Chinese characters (called Nom Dao) for writing literature, ritual documents and other important texts. The Dao cultural identity is expressed clearly through their annual festivals, primitive beliefs and ritual ceremonies. Almost all the village festivals and ceremonies serve to bring good fortune, particularly during the time of the rice harvest. The Dao also follow the tradition of ancestral worship. The Dao have maintained their traditional religion, which is based in the main on Taoism but has also incorporated a number of other religions. They consider "Ban Vuong" to be their creator, (Ban Vuong is in fact a dog) and as such he is always worshipped together with their ancestors. This also accounts for some of the other anomalies found within this group, in particular their better treatment of animals, refusal to eat dog meat, and the strange paw prints and multi - colored dogs that still appear on their fabrics. (Source: 54 Traditions Gallery, MSR, 2012)Read more

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Prehistoric Pottery, Cases Grande Hand Painted Polychrome Pottery Olla, #915

Prehistoric Pottery Cases Grande Hand Painted Polychorme Pottery Olla 915. Description: Prehistoric Pottery Cases Grande hand painted polychrome Olla, 850-1336 AD Dimension: 7'' x 8'' Condition: Very good for its age. Provenance: From the estate of Colorado Collector Some background on Casas Grande Follows: Paquim̩, better known as Casas Grandes, was a major cultural and trade center in the northwestern region of today's Chihuahua state for hundreds of years before the arrival of the Spanish in northern Mexico. Culturally affiliated in many ways to Mesoamerica to the south, Casa Grandes acted as an intermediary between Central American peoples and the Mogollon and Hohokam peoples to the north. Its area of influence reached from central New Mexico in the north to central Chihuahua in the south. Its peak of development occurred in the 13th and 14th centuries. Trade items included shells, copper, pottery, and macaws. The ruins of Paquim̩ include more than 2000 rooms, indicating the importance of this settlement. Casas Grandes is known for its remarkable pottery. Today, residents of the neighboring village of Mata Ortiz create pottery inspired by Casas Grandes work, and this pottery is in high demand. (Source: university of Texas at El Paso). Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo's local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated most frequently with paint and occasionally with applique. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo's pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art. (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona)Read more

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Bronze Sculpture, "Dream Maiden", limited edition of 100, by James

Western Decor 1000. Description: Bronze Sculpture, "Dream Maiden", limited edition of 100, by James Regimbal, Made to order. ''The dream for peace and a dream for leaders. This beautiful bronze with its all acid colored patina, is a sculpture of a Lakota Sioux maiden. She's a favorite with collectors. The maiden is standing on buffalo pelts and robes, perhaps in a tee-pee. Holding a chiefs bonnet, buffalo calf pelt over her arm, a new beginning. The pipe bag and peace pipe are being held, with a cooling fan at her feet. Important elements needed for a leader. What the maiden is thinking or dreaming about, it seems to be clear, To gain peace you need leaders. Dimensions: 29 3/4" high X 22 1/2" wide x 11 1/2" deep All orders require 1/3 down. Deposits are not refundable once the order is placed. When the bronze sculpture is cast and ready for shipping, the balance is due before the bronze is shipped. Once ordered, twelve to fifteen weeks is standard for art foundry's, and sometimes it could take two to three weeks longer if foundry's get behind on work loads. Special colored patinas are offered to collectors if requested before hand. All bronzes come with a studio certificate of authenticity, signed by the artist. Artist: James Regimbal strives to pass on the true story of our American heritage through his bronze sculpture. According to James: "Only the best of my work is good enough to be cast in bronze. Work that has been fully designed and completely executed should have this liberty. It's not the cost of bronze itself, though very expensive to have cast, but the everlasting life and beauty of bronze. Knowing that in years to come these sculptures will still be in existence and appreciated, passing on a true story of our heritage. The demand we put on creating excellence today is to show our selves and future generations. The work that has been completed in this life long collection is a culmination of decades of genuine American creativity, craftsmanship ,labor and talent. Like in the past, as in European country's the artist and craftsmen would work without seeming end. Time wasn't of the essence, but quality, accuracy and demand for excellence was always present in those days. The quality the old masters achieved with limited tools, compared today, is astounding, but the quality in this contemporary historical western collection is of the same. Perfection from me as the artist is the first step, the pride of workmanship from over fifty artisans, men and women laboring on these bronze limited editions. The foundry men sacrificed to bring out the best in their foundry's, not to forget the agents, dealers and gallery's demanding the best works from the artist and foundry's. The important people keeping the art going are the collectors in the world, the patrons of the arts who purchase and support the work, displaying it in their homes and keeping our historical culture alive. These are some of the most important ingredients in helping an artist continue to strive for the best works he or she possibly can create Hopefully my work will stand the test of time, and the realistic nature of the work will tell and keep alive a part of our romantic American history for generations to come." Regimbal creates very detailed, historically accurate bronzes. Taking his inspiration from true to life western books and western movies. Regimbal has detailed all aspects of the cowboy's life from the pre-1900. Subjects such as packers, Indians, warriors, hunters, story tellers, cavalrymen and bronco busters have all been accurately portrayed down to the minutest details by this talented sculptor. Regimbal researches every detail - buckles, pack items, saddles - all in an attempt to bring to life each scene in history as if the viewer were actually there. Regimbal's demand for excellence has resulted in hundreds of national and international collectors including the University of Montana Foundation, which has the complete collection of his works and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. The artist has received the George Phippen Award, and Southern Nevada Communications uses his bronzes for logos in their advertisements. It is Regimbal's desire that his sculptures will stand the test of time and keep alive a part of our romantic American history for many generations to come. (Source: May Gallery) Creating the James Regimbal Bronze: I asked James, what goes into making one of his bronze sculptures. He replied as follows: "It's bronze, silver and gold their finding at the bottom of the ocean, most all other metals corrode away in salt water. Bronze and the lost wax process hasn't changed much over the ages, the principles are the same, bronze is still the artist choice. With time and effort, artists finish their work. Master molds are made of the original sculpture. Complicated subjects could be made up of dozens of molds. Today most molds are made out of a RTV or silicone rubber, instead of plaster. Once the molds are made there ready for the lost wax process." "The molds are filled with hot wax and poured out several times to build up a hallow layer of wax in each mold, some molds are poured with solid wax, "small pieces''. When the wax is cooled enough the mold is removed and the wax sculpture appears. The wax will have vents and sprews attached added for molten metal to flow through. The wax sculpture will then be dipped in the investment material made up of a high temperature plaster type silica sand mix, it holds up under white hot temperatures, many layers are coated and built up around the wax sculpture. When cured the piece with the investment around it is put into a high temperature oven, heated white hot and the wax is melted or burnt out," the lost wax". With the wax gone the inverted impression is left in the investment. " "James Regimbal bronzes are made out of Evedure virgin bronze, finer unused metal. The bronze ingets are melted at 1800 to 2000 degrees and poured into each investment, When cooled the investment is broken away. The bronze pieces of the sculpture are now cleaned up, sprews and vents removed, much metal chasing, grinding and cutting is done before the final assemblage, some Regimbal sculptures have over forty five castings making them up. To complete the sculpture, all pieces are welded together, silver soldering is also used. All welds are ground and sculpted to match the artist original textures. The bronze is then sand blasted or glass beaded, its now ready for the color or patina. The patina is a acid, chemically induced on to the surface with torched heat to penetrate the surface of the bronze. Colors are up to the artist. After patina, the bronze is lacquered or hot wax is melted on to the surface, closing up the pours of the bronze. It is then put on its base and is ready to enter gallery's and homes of the collectors of the world." -------- Expanded Biography of James P Regimbal by N. D. Wolf James P. Regimbal was born on June 8, 1949 in Yakima Washington. From early on the powers that were needed, seemed to lend a hand in shaping this artist’s destiny. "Ghost riders in the sky” was the #1 hit at the time and the haunting western song would set the theme of the future works that would become his legacy. Even at a very young age many would take notice of his unusual talent at art. As a small child in catholic school, first grade, he was often encouraged to stay in at recess to fill the chalkboards with his incredible drawings. The nuns would watch in rapt amazement as the little boy, standing on a stool, rendered likeness' of themselves, the priests and other children in colored chalk. In junior high his art teacher and local art activist Blanch Cook, was so impressed with his talent, she saw to it personally that he be allowed two art classes in high school instead of one, paying for the extra supplies out of her own pocket. The principle of the high agreed that this kid was indeed special. In college he continued to excel in art and his works were often used as examples for others. After college James' future seemed uncertain as the Vietnam War was looming overhead like a black cloud and he was classified 1A for the draft. Fate was certainly on his side with a draft lottery drawing, with an incredible stroke of luck he escaped being sent off to war, now to be able to pursue his destiny as a sculptor. Coming from a ranching family this was not considered a serious vocation, however, his siblings were of the mind that his sculpting was merely more then, ''playing with putty''. His confidence and determination unshaken he left Yakima with $34.00 in his pocket and a dream. For the next six years he rode the freight trains up and down the west coast, making and selling his sculptures whenever and wherever he could. Most of these early works were created out of poly-form clay using only his hands and a toothpick He would cook them in a camp stove oven, most were then painted. Most of these sculptures were 4 1/2 to 7'' high and depicted cowboys and Indians sitting on blankets. He sold countless numbers of these and gave many away as mementos to female admirer's he met along the way. His only traveling companion being "Champ'' the loyal, protective German Shepherd he adopted at a local pound, for ten dollars in Laguna beach California. Although preferring to not settle in any one place for very long before hoping on another freight train, James would occasionally rent a garage for a while at $20.00 a month in order to set up a temporary studio. It was in such a garage in San Diego that he began making full size sculptures of Indians, cowboys, soldiers and many more different subjects, making them all out of fabric and boat resin. These were displayed outside of ''Ben Guns gun shop'' on a busy street corner and rapidly gained national media attention, especially the ones of Nixon and Kissinger, and made James a local celebrity. Not content to rest on his laurels and his garage studio, James and Champ made their way back to Laguna Beach. He began producing plaster castings of his western sculptures that were being sold to suppliers to ''Diamonds of Arizona''. He quickly tired of the “plasters” living with them in a garage and moved on to create more of his original clay sculptures. He settled in San Juan Capistrano in 1975-76 where an Indian shop let him and Champ sleep in the floor, while he worked, making more clay sculptures at night and selling them in the shop and out on the sidewalks during the day. He was successful enough to then buy a truck and camper and set off to Montana and Wyoming where he continued to sell his sculptures on sidewalks and rest stops. Sometimes western shops would let him set up a table to demonstrate and sell his work to the public. James and Camp would later move to California and set up a garage studio in Santa Ana. There he created works that would be sold by shops in San Juan Capistrano including ''Southwestern Antique and Gallery", that was owned by his old friend Norm Moldenhower. It was there Jim met artist Ace Powell who was doing a show at the gallery. Ace really liked James' work and had him create pieces for him. They were bought and shipped through the gallery to Montana, ''Ace Powell airport.'' Knowing James situation, Ace told him not to give up. In 1977 James would get his big break when he met bronze art agent Lou Kaplan who was doing business with Norm Moldenhower’s Gallery. Still living in a garage in Santa Ana, his first piece "Smoothing The Rough Edges'' was created and cast in bronze by ''The Age Of Bronze''. All 50 of the limited editions sold out in one year and James was well on his way to making a good living. The successful union between James and his agent would span 30 years and resulted in James work being featured in many prestigious gallery's, 8 gold metals and the pride of knowing his work was in the homes of some of the most influential and powerful people of the time, his work will be would be passed down for generation to come. James finally settled down in 1982 where he got married, raised a family of three children and is still producing fine art today. N. D. Wolf-10-19-16 You can find more of James’ work athttps://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16131018Read more

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Western Artist: Ron Stewart, "Stage Coach", Oil Painting, Signed Lower

Western Artist: Ron Stewart 749. Western Artist: Ron Stewart, "Stage Coach", oil painting, signed lower left hand corner, Size: 19" x 21". Condition: Excellent condition, with a great frame that sets the image off for maximum effect. --------- Additional Ron Stewart Paintings can be found at:https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16492699 and his Bronze work can be found at:https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16131018 ----------- Ron Stewart is a painter and sculptor of western, historical, wildlife, and animal subjects. He was born in Brooklyn, NY. In the over-crowded field of contemporary western artists, Ron Stewart"s professional achievements have made his work familiar to a wide range of discriminating collectors. Ron is among those who is tied hard and fast to the quality of painting and the historical fidelity of the Old West Masters. The refined artistic abilities, in watercolor, oil, and bronze, are truly distinguished, but Ron brings more to his work than just the technical competence of a western illustrator. The Ron Stewart hallmark is the representation of the mood and the atmosphere appropriate to whatever he approaches. His paintings breathe life into the dusty pages of western history, be it the bawl of longhorn cattle, the war whoop of the red men, or the mountain man in his wilderness solitude. Ron has received awards multiple times at the competitive Death Valley Invitational (5), the George Phippen Memorial (3), and Best of Show, and Best Watercolor at the Pikes Peak National Invitational Show (2), and he also received numerous awards at the Western Artist of America, including three gold medals in Watercolor, two Silver medals in Watercolor, and one Silver medal in Oil, and one Silver medal in Bronze. His work can be seen at Mountain Trail Galleries in Jackson, Wyoming; Signature Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona, and Santa Fe, NM; Long coat Gallery, Ruidoso, NM; Sanders Gallery, Tucson, AZ; and the Culturalpatina Gallery in Fairfax, VA, which has the largest collection of his work in the world. His life was chronicled in Artists of the Rockies and the Golden West in winter of 1979, Ron and his wife Sharon have resided in Arizona for the last 45 years. Stewart has exhibited throughout the West in juried and group shows, collecting a variety of top awards for his works, including numerous gold and silver medals in oil, watercolor, bronze and drawing. International collections include locations in England, France, Germany, Italy, Denmark, Spain, the Philippines, and Japan. ----------------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavDescription:Read more

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Native American Zia Pottery Pot #312

Native American Zia Pottery 312. Description: Native american Zia pottery pot, early 20th c. Size: 7" x 8.25" x 8.25" (18 x 21 x 21 cm). Good overall condition. Nice Patina. A History of Pueblo Pottery: “Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo’s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated—most frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqué. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo’s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome—a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.” (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona) ---------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavRead more

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South American Historic Shipibo Poly-chrome Bowl Circa 1920’s, #831

South American, Historic Shipibo poly-chrom pottery bowl, ca 1920 831. Description: South American Historic Shipibo Indian hand formed and painted bowl. The piece shows a wonderful geometric hand painted poly-chrome design. The bottom is not signed and the piece is from the 1920's. Dimensions: Measures 6" diameter and 2.5" tall. Condition: Very good for its age. --------- The Shipibo-Conibo are an indigenous people along the Ucayali River in the Amazon rain forest in Perú. Formerly two groups, the Shipibo (apemen) and the Conibo (fishmen), they eventually became one distinct tribe through intermarriage and communal ritual and are currently known as the Shipibo-Conibo people. [1] [2] Lifestyle, tradition and diet:The Shipibo-Conibo live in the 21st century while keeping one foot in the past, spanning millennia in the Amazonian rain forest. Many of their traditions are still practiced, such as ayahuasca shamanism. Shamanistic songs have inspired artistic tradition and decorative designs found in their clothing, pottery, tools and textiles. Some of the urbanized people live around Pucallpa in the Yarina Cocha, an extensive indigenous zone. Most others live in scattered villages over a large area of jungle forest extending from Brazil to Ecuador. Shipibo-Conibo women make bead work and textiles, but are probably best known for their pottery, decorated with maze-like red and black geometric patterns. While these ceramics were traditionally made for use in the home, an expanding tourist market has provided many households with extra income through the sale of pots and other craft items. They also prepare chapo, a sweet plantain beverage. The Shipibo of the village of Pao-Yan used to have a diet of fish, yucca and fruits. Now, however, the situation has deteriorated because of global weather changes and now there is mostly just yucca and fish. Since there has been drought followed by flooding, most of the mature fruit trees have died, and some of the banana trees and plantains are struggling. Global increases in energy and food prices have risen due to deforestation and erosion along the Ucayali River. The basic needs of the people are more important now than ever, affecting their long term planning abilities. There is now a sense that hunger may not be that far off for those in the farther reaches of the Shipibo nation. [2] [3] Contact with western sources – including the governments of Peru and Brazil – has been sporadic over the past three centuries. The Shipibo are noted for a rich and complex cosmology, which is tied directly to the art and artifacts they produce. Christian missionaries have worked to convert them since the late 17th century,[4] [5] particularly from the Franciscans.[6] Population: Distribution of the Shipibo-Conibo (marked with an arrow) amongst other Pano-speaking ethnicities With an estimated population of over 20,000, the Shipibo-Conibo represent approximately 8% of the indigenous registered population. Census data is unreliable due to the transitory nature of the group. Large amounts of the population have relocated to urban areas – in particular the eastern Peruvian cities of Pucallpa and Yarinacocha – to gain access to better educational and health services, as well as to look for alternative sources of monetary income. The population numbers for this group have fluctuated in the last decades between approximately 11,000 (Wise and Ribeiro, 1978) to as many as 25,000 individuals (Hern 1994). Like all other indigenous populations in the Amazon basin, the Shipibo-Conibo are threatened by severe pressure from outside influences such as oil speculation, logging, narco-trafficking, conservation, and missionaries. [7] [8] Known authorities: Donald W Lathrap Warren de Boer James A Lauriault/Loriot Earwin H Lauriault References: 1. Eakin, Lucile; Erwin Laurialy; Harry Boonstra (1986). "People of the Ucayali: The Shipibo and Conibo of Peru". International Museum of Cultures Publication: 62. 2. "The Shipibo-Conibo Amazon Forest People at the Dawn of the 21st Century". 3. Bradfield, R.B; James Lauriault (1961). "Diet and food beliefs of Peruvian jungle tribes: 1. The Shipibo (monkey people)". Journal of the American Dietetic (39): 126–28. 4. Eakin, Lucille; Erwin Lauriault; Harry Boonstra (1980). "Bosquejo etnográfico de los shipibo-conibo del Ucayali". Lima: 101. 5. Kensinger, Kenneth M (1985). "Panoan linguistic, folklorisic and ehtnographic research: retrospect and prospect". South American Indian languages: retrospect and prospect: 224–85. 6. Wikisource-logo.svg "Sipibo Indians". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 7.Bardales R., César (1979). "Quimisha Incabo ini yoia (Leyendas de los shipibo-conibo sobre los tres Incas)". Comunidades y Culturas Peruanas (12): 53. 8. Eakin, Lucille. "Nuevo destino: The life story of a Shipibo bilingual eduactor". Summer Institute of Linguistics Museum of Anthropology publication (9): 26. (Source: Wikipedia) ----------------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavDescription: -----------------Read more

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Native American Historic Acoma Poly chrome Jar #192

Native American Historic Acoma Poly chrome Jar 192. Native American Historic Acoma poly chrome jar. Bands of blossom and wing motifs flank a central series of repeated angular feather motifs. Height 9 in, diameter 12 in. From a Tucson area collection: circa 1920-30. This jar along with lots of baskets, and a few textiles were collected by the previous owner back in the 1920's and 30's. A History of Pueblo Pottery: “Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo’s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated—most frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqué. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo’s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome—a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.” (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona) ---------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavRead more

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James P. Regimbal Bronze Sculpture "Peace Maker". Paint and Patina.

Western Decor 996 Description: James P. Regimbal Bronze Sculpture "Peace Maker". Paint and Patina. Limited Edition 16/100. Signed, Available now. This magnificent bronze of a Ogola Sioux chief took James Regimbal a year to create, with its beautiful acid colored patina. A wonderful testimony to our American Indians, an accurate historical look at a 1870's plains Indian chief in full regalia. The full head dress, signifying a main leader of his tribe, showing many eagle feathers and many accomplishments. The chiefs moccasins have the porcupine quills in the back heels. He's holding a full feathered peace pipe in one hand and a coup stick in the other, "big medicine". Standing so tall and proud, perhaps this beautiful Sioux chief is reaching out for peace in his land, as they always wanted. Dimensions: 34" Long x 20" High x 14" Deep. Provenance: The Breen Estate ------------ Artist: James Regimbal strives to pass on the true story of our American heritage through his bronze sculpture. According to James: "Only the best of my work is good enough to be cast in bronze. Work that has been fully designed and completely executed should have this liberty. It's not the cost of bronze itself, though very expensive to have cast, but the everlasting life and beauty of bronze. Knowing that in years to come these sculptures will still be in existence and appreciated, passing on a true story of our heritage. The demand we put on creating excellence today is to show our selves and future generations. The work that has been completed in this life long collection is a culmination of decades of genuine American creativity, craftsmanship ,labor and talent. Like in the past, as in European country's the artist and craftsmen would work without seeming end. Time wasn't of the essence, but quality, accuracy and demand for excellence was always present in those days. The quality the old masters achieved with limited tools, compared today, is astounding, but the quality in this contemporary historical western collection is of the same. Perfection from me as the artist is the first step, the pride of workmanship from over fifty artisans, men and women laboring on these bronze limited editions. The foundry men sacrificed to bring out the best in their foundry's, not to forget the agents, dealers and gallery's demanding the best works from the artist and foundry's. The important people keeping the art going are the collectors in the world, the patrons of the arts who purchase and support the work, displaying it in their homes and keeping our historical culture alive. These are some of the most important ingredients in helping an artist continue to strive for the best works he or she possibly can create Hopefully my work will stand the test of time, and the realistic nature of the work will tell and keep alive a part of our romantic American history for generations to come." Regimbal creates very detailed, historically accurate bronzes. Taking his inspiration from true to life western books and western movies. Regimbal has detailed all aspects of the cowboy's life from the pre-1900. Subjects such as packers, Indians, warriors, hunters, story tellers, cavalrymen and bronco busters have all been accurately portrayed down to the minutest details by this talented sculptor. Regimbal researches every detail - buckles, pack items, saddles - all in an attempt to bring to life each scene in history as if the viewer were actually there. Regimbal's demand for excellence has resulted in hundreds of national and international collectors including the University of Montana Foundation, which has the complete collection of his works, and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. The artist has received the George Phippen Award, and Southern Nevada Communications uses his bronzes for logos in their advertisements. It is Regimbal's desire that his sculptures will stand the test of time and keep alive a part of our romantic American history for many generations to come. (Source: May Gallery) Creating the James Regimbal Bronze: I asked James, what goes into making one of his bronze sculptures. He replied as follows: "It's bronze, silver and gold their finding at the bottom of the ocean, most all other metals corrode away in salt water. Bronze and the lost wax process hasn't changed much over the ages, the principles are the same, bronze is still the artist choice. With time and effort, artists finish their work. Master molds are made of the original sculpture. Complicated subjects could be made up of dozens of molds. Today most molds are made out of a RTV or silicone rubber, instead of plaster. Once the molds are made there ready for the lost wax process." "The molds are filled with hot wax and poured out several times to build up a hallow layer of wax in each mold, some molds are poured with solid wax, "small pieces''. When the wax is cooled enough the mold is removed and the wax sculpture appears. The wax will have vents and sprews attached added for molten metal to flow through. The wax sculpture will then be dipped in the investment material made up of a high temperature plaster type silica sand mix, it holds up under white hot temperatures, many layers are coated and built up around the wax sculpture. When cured the piece with the investment around it is put into a high temperature oven, heated white hot and the wax is melted or burnt out," the lost wax". With the wax gone the inverted impression is left in the investment. " "James Regimbal bronzes are made out of Evedure virgin bronze, finer unused metal. The bronze ingots are melted at 1800 to 2000 degrees and poured into each investment, When cooled the investment is broken away. The bronze pieces of the sculpture are now cleaned up, sprews and vents removed, much metal chasing, grinding and cutting is done before the final assemblage, some Regimbal sculptures have over forty five castings making them up. To complete the sculpture, all pieces are welded together, silver soldering is also used. All welds are ground and sculpted to match the artist original textures. The bronze is then sand blasted or glass beaded, its now ready for the color or patina. The patina is a acid, chemically induced on to the surface with torched heat to penetrate the surface of the bronze. Colors are up to the artist. After patina, the bronze is lacquered or hot wax is melted on to the surface, closing up the pours of the bronze. It is then put on its base and is ready to enter gallery's and homes of the collectors of the world." -------- Expanded Biography of James P Regimbal by N. D. Wolf James P. Regimbal was born on June 8, 1949 in Yakima Washington. From early on the powers that were needed, seemed to lend a hand in shaping this artist’s destiny. "Ghost riders in the sky” was the #1 hit at the time and the haunting western song would set the theme of the future works that would become his legacy. Even at a very young age many would take notice of his unusual talent at art. As a small child in catholic school, first grade, he was often encouraged to stay in at recess to fill the chalkboards with his incredible drawings. The nuns would watch in rapt amazement as the little boy, standing on a stool, rendered likeness' of themselves, the priests and other children in colored chalk. In junior high his art teacher and local art activist Blanch Cook, was so impressed with his talent, she saw to it personally that he be allowed two art classes in high school instead of one, paying for the extra supplies out of her own pocket. The principle of the high agreed that this kid was indeed special. In college he continued to excel in art and his works were often used as examples for others. After college James' future seemed uncertain as the Vietnam War was looming overhead like a black cloud and he was classified 1A for the draft. Fate was certainly on his side with a draft lottery drawing, with an incredible stroke of luck he escaped being sent off to war, now to be able to pursue his destiny as a sculptor. Coming from a ranching family this was not considered a serious vocation, however, his siblings were of the mind that his sculpting was merely more then, ''playing with putty''. His confidence and determination unshaken he left Yakima with $34.00 in his pocket and a dream. For the next six years he rode the freight trains up and down the west coast, making and selling his sculptures whenever and wherever he could. Most of these early works were created out of poly-form clay using only his hands and a toothpick He would cook them in a camp stove oven, most were then painted. Most of these sculptures were 4 1/2 to 7'' high and depicted cowboys and Indians sitting on blankets. He sold countless numbers of these and gave many away as mementos to female admirer's he met along the way. His only traveling companion being "Champ'' the loyal, protective German Shepherd he adopted at a local pound, for ten dollars in Laguna beach California. Although preferring to not settle in any one place for very long before hoping on another freight train, James would occasionally rent a garage for a while at $20.00 a month in order to set up a temporary studio. It was in such a garage in San Diego that he began making full size sculptures of Indians, cowboys, soldiers and many more different subjects, making them all out of fabric and boat resin. These were displayed outside of ''Ben Guns gun shop'' on a busy street corner and rapidly gained national media attention, especially the ones of Nixon and Kissinger, and made James a local celebrity. Not content to rest on his laurels and his garage studio, James and Champ made their way back to Laguna Beach. He began producing plaster castings of his western sculptures that were being sold to suppliers to ''Diamonds of Arizona''. He quickly tired of the “plasters” living with them in a garage and moved on to create more of his original clay sculptures. He settled in San Juan Capistrano in 1975-76 where an Indian shop let him and Champ sleep in the floor, while he worked, making more clay sculptures at night and selling them in the shop and out on the sidewalks during the day. He was successful enough to then buy a truck and camper and set off to Montana and Wyoming where he continued to sell his sculptures on sidewalks and rest stops. Sometimes western shops would let him set up a table to demonstrate and sell his work to the public. James and Camp would later move to California and set up a garage studio in Santa Ana. There he created works that would be sold by shops in San Juan Capistrano including ''Southwestern Antique and Gallery", that was owned by his old friend Norm Moldenhower. It was there Jim met artist Ace Powell who was doing a show at the gallery. Ace really liked James' work and had him create pieces for him. They were bought and shipped through the gallery to Montana, ''Ace Powell airport.'' Knowing James situation, Ace told him not to give up. In 1977 James would get his big break when he met bronze art agent Lou Kaplan who was doing business with Norm Moldenhower’s Gallery. Still living in a garage in Santa Ana, his first piece "Smoothing The Rough Edges'' was created and cast in bronze by ''The Age Of Bronze''. All 50 of the limited editions sold out in one year and James was well on his way to making a good living. The successful union between James and his agent would span 30 years and resulted in James work being featured in many prestigious gallery's, 8 gold metals and the pride of knowing his work was in the homes of some of the most influential and powerful people of the time, his work will be would be passed down for generation to come. James finally settled down in 1982 where he got married, raised a family of three children and is still producing fine art today. N. D. Wolf-10-19-16 You can find more of James’ work athttps://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16131018Read more

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Native American Large Pima Basket Bowl, Ca 1950's #817

Native American Large Pima Basket Bowl 817. Native American Large Pima Basket Bowl having undulating geometric designs and dark center with radiating forms. Dimensions: Height 6 x diameter 18 1/2 inches. Condition: Excellent for its age. --------- Basket making was one of the earliest skills developed since baskets were needed for carrying goods, for storage, for trapping and fishing, and for religious ceremonies. Unlike pottery, baskets do not survive for extended periods of time. Most that are available today were constructed in the last 120 years, particularly after native people in the Southwest began to make baskets with the idea of selling them and moved baskets into the category of artistic collectibles. Those made between 1880 and 1930 tend to be the most valuable, particularly if they are in good condition, well-made, and have an interesting design, but these latter factors can make any basket desirable. One can quickly summarize baskets by type and construction, but the strongest interest has been in understanding tribal variations since different tribes used different materials, different construction styles, different quality and particularly different decorations. As a result, the following offers some general comments on the first two issues and then seeks greater detail on tribal variation. Types Trays and bowls are the most common forms, but there are a few unusual types of baskets: Ollas (prounced "oy-yuh" , a Spanish word meaning jar with a neck and mouth) This Olla shape was conducive to storing grain with less spillage. Burden baskets are simply designed to ease the burden of a heavy load. Many hang over the head and rest on the person’s back. The conical shape conforms to a person’s back and evenly distributes the load’s weight. The Apache ones add tin cones that are noisy and seem effective in scaring away snakes. Plaques are flat and often are used for decoration. They are commonly made by the Hopi. Cradle boards are another form of basket that is used to carry a child supported against a stiff board. The child is tightly wrapped against the board giving a sense of security and freeing the person carrying the child to do other things with her hands. Again, decoration became more important as they became collectibles. Water jugs were covered with pitch so the basket would hold liquids. Carrying liquid in a coated basket makes the burden much lighter than what it would be if the liquid were carried in pottery. CONSTRUCTION: There are a small number of basic methods for making baskets, but each option can be varied based on materials and factors like the thickness of the stitch or by varying over and under patterns. The most common type of basket construction is coiling in which a larger substance called the warp is coiled in circles starting at the center. A thinner material called the weft is stitched around the coils to hold them in place and can add decoration. Sometimes, the thick material is actually a bundle of thin material like grass. The coil is spiraled outward and, unless the intent is a plaque, upward. This method offers more strength and more opportunity for decoration. Greater stability results from using a warp of multiple thick rods that are stitched together. supports together. The thinner materials that are wrapped over and under the supports again provide decoration. The weaver can shift the direction or use three stands instead of two or pass over two rods instead of one to vary the appearance and make a design. Diagonal twining involves having the wefts go around two rods at a time but shifting which two on each row. In other words, on the first row, the weft would be wrapped around rods 1 and 2, 3 and 4, etc. On the next row, they would be wrapped around 2 and 3, then 4 and 5, etc. A decorative element can be wrapped around the outside wefts to create an impression that is called false embroidery. Plaiting requires the use of flat strips that are woven over and under each other. Often, the strips are placed in a diagonal pattern. Again, it is common to add variations like over one and under two. A mixture of variations adds to the design. This style tends to be easier than the other two and creates stronger, more rigid baskets. Plaiting was also used to build traps, fences and the like. Wicker is similar to plaiting but uses round materials with one of the sets being thicker and adding stability to the material. Often the thicker material is less visible or completely covered by the thinner material. Wicker is similar to plaiting but uses round materials with one of the sets being thicker and adding stability to the material. Often the thicker material is less visible or completely covered by the thinner material. Preparing the materials for weaving often takes longer than the weaving itself. Once appropriate materials were located, they had to be cut, cleaned, and then split or peeled since the natural material tended to be too thick for the wefts. The weaver usually needs to use her or his teeth for the splitting and peeling. During weaving, the materials were often dampened so that the weave would get tighter as it dried. TRIBAL CHARACTERISTICS: The most valuable baskets are those made by the Apache and Yavapai. Both tribes traveled a lot probably making well-built baskets more important, but, in the latter part of the 1800s, the two groups were forced onto the same reservation in the desert near San Carlos. In this unpleasant harsh life, the women had a chance to share techniques although both groups maintained their own style. After they were allowed to return to reservations in their more traditional areas, both groups recognized that they could generate a modest income by selling their baskets and production increased. APACHE: Earlier Apache baskets were usually coiled and used three rods for the warp making these baskets very sturdy and stiff. By 1930, production of these baskets declined as children were forced into schools that did not teach basket making and older members of the tribe were pressured into other work. The basket making skills seemed to die out for a decade and were eventually replaced by making of simpler single coil ones. Burden baskets were often twined instead of coiled with twining particularly common for the Mescalero tribe. Apache baskets tend to use contrasting colors and geometric or pictorial designs. The traditional ones are very sturdy [because of the three coils] and the external weft is usually willow with material from devils claw seed bags for the dark color. The willow tends to start as an off white but ages to a golden tan or light brown. A sun-burnt willow that is darker and reddish was sometimes used for decoration. Dark red yucca root was also used for design work in rare occasions. Those baskets that added an extra color are called polychrome. Newer baskets sometimes were twined and used a greater variety of materials including cottonwood, berry bushes, and sumac as well as willow. Dyes became more common for adding color, but the basic color is lighter than in those that have aged. Apache designs are less symmetrical and, at times, seemed cluttered. They frequently include figures (human, dog, deer, and snake). Weavers suggest that it is helpful to let the basket talk to them and tell them the design rather than planning it ahead of time. As a result, there is less consistency in weave as well as design but such variation can add interest. The use of devil’s claw has declined in modern Apache designs. (Source: Smoki museum) ----------------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavDescription:Read more

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Oil Painting : Ron Stewart Oil Painting, Original Ron Stewart Oil

Oil Painting 165. Description: This extraordinary Oil painting by Listed Artist Ron Stewart (1941-) entitled Morning Silence. Signed lower left: Ron Stewart @ (cyphers). Verso: titled. Dimensions: Size is 20 x 24 inches. Condition: Excellent Condition for its age. The piece was painted in 2014. ----------- Additional Ron Stewart Paintings can be found at:https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16492699 and his Bronze work can be found at:https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16131018 ----------- Ron Stewart is a painter and sculptor of western, historical, wildlife, and animal subjects. He was born in Brooklyn, NY. In the over-crowded field of contemporary western artists, Ron Stewarts professional achievements have made his work familiar to a wide range of discriminating collectors. Ron is among those who is tied hard and fast to the quality of painting and the historical fidelity of the Old West Masters. The refined artistic abilities, in watercolor, oil, and bronze, are truly distinguished, but Ron brings more to his work than just the technical competence of a western illustrator. The Ron Stewart hallmark is the representation of the mood and the atmosphere appropriate to whatever he approaches. His paintings breathe life into the dusty pages of western history, be it the bawl of longhorn cattle, the war whoop of the red men, or the mountain man in his wilderness solitude. Ron has received awards multiple times at the competitive Death Valley Invitational (5), the George Phippen Memorial (3), and Best of Show, and Best Watercolor at the Pikes Peak National Invitational Show (2), and he also received numerous awards at the Western Artist of America, including three gold medals in Watercolor, two Silver medals in Watercolor, and one Silver medal in Oil, and one Silver medal in Bronze. His work can be seen at Mountain Trail Galleries in Jackson, Wyoming; Signature Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona, and Santa Fe, NM; Long coat Gallery, Ruidoso, NM; Sanders Gallery, Tucson, AZ; and the Culturalpatina Gallery in Fairfax, VA. His life was chronicled in Artists of the Rockies and the Golden West in winter of 1979, Ron and his wife Sharon have resided in Arizona for the last 45 years. Stewart has exhibited throughout the West in juried and group shows, collecting a variety of top awards for his works, including numerous gold and silver medals in oil, watercolor, bronze and drawing. International collections include locations in England, France, Germany, Italy, Denmark, Spain, the Philippines, and Japan. ----------------- View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavDescription:Read more

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James Regimbal Rare Ltd Edition Western Bronze "Hunting Party" Cowboy

James Regimbal Rare limited edition western bronze 468. James Regimbal Rare limited Edition Western Bronze "Hunting Party" Cowboy and Indians, The story in this sculpture: "The Hunting Party" is of a lone cowboy hunter returning home with his horses in tow. The amazing detail can be seen with each one of his horses carrying his supplies along with his days' hunts. The cowboy is depicted descending a small mountain trail with his three horses & his belongings in tow as a small group of Native American Indians lay in hiding & wait. The Indians are looking to spring a surprise ambush in the hopes of stealing the cowboy's horses, belongings, valuables and hunting trophies. A scene played out in the foot hills and mountains of the American Wild West frontier. This large and heavy bronze metal sculpture is exquisite, stunning and highly detailed. The sculpture is mounted on top of a thick, black polished marble stone base. It is approximately 20" long by 10 inches wide, by 14.5 inches tall and weighs some 75 pounds. This bronze sculpture comes from the estate of Julius Blocker of East Hampton, N.Y. Mr. Blocker was a graduate of Hobart, William & Smith, and earned a master's degree from Columbia University in International Affairs. Mr. Blocker became a Fulbright Scholar at the Freie Universitat (Free University) in West Berlin, Germany. He was a member of the Steuben Society, a board member of the Fine Arts Council in Key West, Florida and a supporter of the arts in East Hampton, N.Y. Ex NY collector. James Regimbal strives to pass on the true story of our American heritage through his bronze sculpture. According to James: Only the best of my work is good enough to be cast in bronze...Perfection from me, is the first step. Regimbal creates very detailed, historically accurate bronzes. Taking his inspiration from true to life western books and western movies. Regimbal has detailed all aspects of the cowboy's life from the pre-1900's. Subjects such as packers, Indians, warriors, hunters, story tellers, cavalrymen and bronco busters have all been accurately portrayed down to the minutest details by this talented sculptor. Regimbal researches every detail - buckles, pack items, saddles - all in an attempt to bring to life each scene in history as if the viewer were actually there. Regimbal's demand for excellence has resulted in hundreds of national and international collectors including the University of Montana Foundation, which has the complete collection of his works. The artist has received the George Phippen Award, and Southern Nevada Communications uses his bronzes for logos in their advertisements. It is Regimbal's desire that his sculptures will stand the test of time and keep alive a part of our romantic American history for many generations to come. (Source: May Gallery)Read more

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