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FELIX CHOPIN

FELIX CHOPIN, (1813 - Paris - 1892), TAZZA, St. Petersburg, circa 1840/45, Bronze, vergoldet, teilweise versilbert, dunkel patiniert. Höhe 25 cm - Tazza 25 x 17,5 cm, Naturalistische Gestaltung in Form einer Erdscholle mit Blättern, Wasserstürzen und Meeresschnecken. Füße in Form zweier Meeresschnecken, floraler Schaft, Schale mit Eidechse, seitlich zwei Vögel. Die ungewöhnliche, wohl singuläre Tazza hat Formen und Motive einer Brunnenschale. Alle Teile sind durch bewegte und belebte Motive gestaltet, die virtuos im äußersten Naturalismus bewegt dargestellt werden. Felix Chopin führte als Hoflieferant des Zaren einen beträchtlichen Teil der Bronzen für den kaiserlichen Hof aus. Für die Petershofer Inneneinrichtung im Stil des 2. Rokoko wurde auch die selten angewandte Verbindung von Vergoldung und Versilberung bei Bronzearbeiten häufig verwendet. Die Tazza gehört in die Frühzeit des Schaffens von Felix Chopin. Gutachten von Prof. Hans Ottomeyer, Berlin vom 30.7.2011, Diese E-Mail-Adresse ist vor Spambots geschützt! Zur Anzeige muss JavaScript eingeschaltet sein!, + - weitere Informationen Click to collapse Félix Chopin was the son of the Parisian fondeur Julien Chopin. After beginning his career in Paris he moved to St. Petersburg in 1838 and around 1841 acquired the workshop of Alexander Guérin which was on the verge of bankruptcy. A keen entrepreneur, Chopin soon revitalized the business by moving to new premises and employing new craftsman, however the real secret to his success was his keen eye that responded quickly to the slightest change in fashion. Chopin was for over forty years the principal supplier to the Russian Imperial Court and, despite his prodigious output, was so in demand that he risked currying disfavour by declining prestigious orders. Notable commissions included chandeliers and sconces for the Kremlin Palace in Moscow (1845-1849), chandeliers, clocks and candelabra for the Marble Palace in St. Petersburg (1849), the Tsarevich's personal palace in Peterhof (1850) and the palace of Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich (1855-1886). At the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1878 he presented a Louis XVI style bronze and malachite console table and various ormolu objets d'art. Detailed report by Prof. Hans Ottomeyer, Berlin who dates the Tazza as an early work of Chopin’s artistic output, + - weitere Informationen Click to collapse, + - weitere Informationen Click to collapse, +, -, weitere Informationen, Click to collapse, Félix Chopin was the son of the Parisian fondeur Julien Chopin. After beginning his career in Paris he moved to St. Petersburg in 1838 and around 1841 acquired the workshop of Alexander Guérin which was on the verge of bankruptcy. A keen entrepreneur, Chopin soon revitalized the business by moving to new premises and employing new craftsman, however the real secret to his success was his keen eye that responded quickly to the slightest change in fashion. Chopin was for over forty years the principal supplier to the Russian Imperial Court and, despite his prodigious output, was so in demand that he risked currying disfavour by declining prestigious orders. Notable commissions included chandeliers and sconces for the Kremlin Palace in Moscow (1845-1849), chandeliers, clocks and candelabra for the Marble Palace in St. Petersburg (1849), the Tsarevich's personal palace in Peterhof (1850) and the palace of Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich (1855-1886). At the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1878 he presented a Louis XVI style bronze and malachite console table and various ormolu objets d'art. Detailed report by Prof. Hans Ottomeyer, Berlin who dates the Tazza as an early work of Chopin’s artistic output, Félix Chopin was the son of the Parisian fondeur Julien Chopin. After beginning his career in Paris he moved to St. Petersburg in 1838 and around 1841 acquired the workshop of Alexander Guérin which was on the verge of bankruptcy. A keen entrepreneur, Chopin soon revitalized the business by moving to new premises and employing new craftsman, however the real secret to his success was his keen eye that responded quickly to the slightest change in fashion. Chopin was for over forty years the principal supplier to the Russian Imperial Court and, despite his prodigious output, was so in demand that he risked currying disfavour by declining prestigious orders. Notable commissions included chandeliers and sconces for the Kremlin Palace in Moscow (1845-1849), chandeliers, clocks and candelabra for the Marble Palace in St. Petersburg (1849), the Tsarevich's personal palace in Peterhof (1850) and the palace of Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich (1855-1886). At the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1878 he presented a Louis XVI style bronze and malachite console table and various ormolu objets d'art. Detailed report by Prof. Hans Ottomeyer, Berlin who dates the Tazza as an early work of Chopin’s artistic outputRead more

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Claude-Joseph VERNET

Claude-Joseph VERNET, (1714 Avignon – 1789 Paris), "Vue des Cascatelles de Tivoli", c. 1737 - 1740, 119 x 141 cm - 47 x 55½ in. Preliminary version to the picture in the collection Musée du Louvre, Paris, Preis auf Anfrage, Diese E-Mail-Adresse ist vor Spambots geschützt! Zur Anzeige muss JavaScript eingeschaltet sein!, + - weitere Informationen Click to collapse Provenance: 1740 Henri Joseph Eugène de Villardi, Comte de Quinson, Marquis de Montlaur 1864 collection Eugène de Montlaur, Chateau de Lyonne / Vichy 1931 Joseph de Boutray, Paris 1966 with Galerie Heim-Gairac, Paris by 1989 George Encil collection, Bahamas 1990 Sotheby’s London where acquired by Prof. Dr. Friedhelm Beuker, Düsseldorf Meerbusch 1995 Lempertz Cologne Private collection, Germany JOSEPH VERNET painted several views of the Roman Campagna, in particular the locations around Tivoli. Eighteenth-century critics admired in his landscapes the "truth" they were looking for, as stated with enthusiasm by La Font de Saint-Yenne in his commentary on the Salon of 1746, where Vernet was exhibiting for the first time. Diderot praised the picturesque effects, the play of light and water, that „science of effect“ in the artist’s work, commenting 1767 that one could "visit" a painting by Vernet just as one may visit a natural site. Vernet painted three variants of “Vue des Cascatelles de Tivoli”, one of them today in the Louvre. Not an accurate depiction of the actual site, the subject is an imaginary composition based on a view of the famous Neptune’s Grotto at Tivoli. Philip Conisbee, the late Vernet specialist who prepared a critical catalogue raisonné, dated the composition as early in Vernet’s roman career. The 20 year old artist arrived 1734 in Rome, first trips to Tivoli and Naples are reported 1737. His early works in the style of Salvator Rosa with a restricted palette of warm and subtle browns, ochres and olive greens were most sought after by eighteenth-century collectors. Conisbee compared the „broad and brushy facture“ of the Louvre version with the 1737 “Tivoli Waterfalls” in the Cleveland Museum of Art (121 x 170 cm, Ingersoll-Smouse n°554) or „even closer“, with the 1738 “Rocky Landscape in Italy“, in the Dulwich Picture Gallery (119 x 170 cm, Ingersoll-Smouse n°466), which are the earliest known dated works from the Italian period.1 The present work, a slightly smaller variant of the Louvre painting (canvas 124 x 160 cm, Inv. 8332), reappeared in the mid-1960s and was purchased by the Canadian George Encil, who had his important art collection published in 1989. The painting shows compared to the Louvre version a less detailed execution in the rocks which appear broader in touch - according to Conisbee characteristic for early works like the dated Dulwich landscape. Other details as the treatment of the sky, the town in the background, the figures and technical aspects like the opaque green touches to structure the dark parts of the grotto and the red preparation of the canvas are virtually identical to the Louvre version. The same composition on a narrower format is achieved by slight variations, visible for instance by the changed position of the person leading a donkey in relation to the cracks in the rock behind. Vernet reused the Neptune’s Grotto as a setting for his famous work “Les Baigneuses” 1759, 66.5 x 82.5 cm (Lempertz Cologne, 17 november 2006, lot 1332 – provenance: Sotheby’s London, 5 july 1995, lot 83 - British Rail Pension Fund collection), where the background is changed to a marine with a romantic sunset in a palette typical for his mature style. The illustrious provenance of the present work has only recently been entirely traced: 1740 Vernet traveled with the Comte de Quinson, one of his first patrons who became a close friend and acquired two important landscapes, leading the artist’s “Livre de Raison – Reçus” as entry n°1.2 These two pictures, one of them described as “Cascatelles de Tivoli”, remained in the collection of his heir Eugène de Montlaur (1815-1895)3. His son, the 7th Vicomte de Montlaur, Humbert-Eugène (1850-1931) died without direct descendants. The estate went in the 1960s to his nephew Joseph de Boutray (1895-1977) who dispersed the art collection and finally sold Chateau de Lyonne in 1976.4 1 Letter to Guillaume Faroult, Curator of paintings, Musée du Louvre, 02 november 2003 2 Livre de Reçus, published by Lagrange 1864, p.359 : “1. Pour M. le comte de Quinson deux tableaux en toile d’empereur un une cascade et l’autre une Marine…120 Ecus romains” According to Lagrange both men had a close relationship, proven by the correspondence in possession of the Montlaur family by 1864. 3 Lagrange 1864, p.483 : “Chez le marquis Eug.de Montlaur [Humbert-Eugène-Léopold de VILLARDI QUINSON de MONTLAUR,1850 -1931] Naufrage – Pêche du thon – Les Blanchisseuses. Chez le même, au château de Lyonne, près Vichy : Cascatelles de Tivoli – Côtes de la Méditerranée, route de la corniche. – voir page 26” 4 Hervé de Montlaur (e-mail communication, 15 oct. 2010) Bibliography : L.Lagrange, Joseph Vernet, sa vie et son oeuvre, Paris 1858 L.Lagrange, Joseph Vernet et la peinture du XVIIIème siècle, Paris 1864, p.26-27, 359, 483 F.Ingersoll-Smouse, Joseph Vernet peintre de marine 1714-89, vol.1, Paris 1926, p.18 + 111, no 467; n°41 Ph.Conisbee, Salvator Rosa and Claude-Joseph Vernet, Burlington Magazine, n.849, december 1973, pp.789 Ph.Conisbee, Joseph Vernet 1714–1789, exhibition catalogue Kenwood 1976 and Musée de la Marine, Paris 1977 V.Prat, Experience and Adventures of a Collector, The George Encil Collection, Paris 1989, pp.182 + 428 ; V.Prat, La fascinante collection de l’inventeur des téléskis, Supplément Arts Figaro-Magazine, nouvelle série n°31, Paris, 25 june 1988; G.Faroult, Le tableau du mois no.107: vue d’une cascade à traverse des rochers, dite „Vue des cascatelles de Tivoli“ de Joseph Vernet, Musée du Louvre, Paris 2004 < Zurück Weiter >, + - weitere Informationen Click to collapse, + - weitere Informationen Click to collapse, +, -, weitere Informationen, Click to collapse, Provenance: 1740 Henri Joseph Eugène de Villardi, Comte de Quinson, Marquis de Montlaur 1864 collection Eugène de Montlaur, Chateau de Lyonne / Vichy 1931 Joseph de Boutray, Paris 1966 with Galerie Heim-Gairac, Paris by 1989 George Encil collection, Bahamas 1990 Sotheby’s London where acquired by Prof. Dr. Friedhelm Beuker, Düsseldorf Meerbusch 1995 Lempertz Cologne Private collection, Germany JOSEPH VERNET painted several views of the Roman Campagna, in particular the locations around Tivoli. Eighteenth-century critics admired in his landscapes the "truth" they were looking for, as stated with enthusiasm by La Font de Saint-Yenne in his commentary on the Salon of 1746, where Vernet was exhibiting for the first time. Diderot praised the picturesque effects, the play of light and water, that „science of effect“ in the artist’s work, commenting 1767 that one could "visit" a painting by Vernet just as one may visit a natural site. Vernet painted three variants of “Vue des Cascatelles de Tivoli”, one of them today in the Louvre. Not an accurate depiction of the actual site, the subject is an imaginary composition based on a view of the famous Neptune’s Grotto at Tivoli. Philip Conisbee, the late Vernet specialist who prepared a critical catalogue raisonné, dated the composition as early in Vernet’s roman career. The 20 year old artist arrived 1734 in Rome, first trips to Tivoli and Naples are reported 1737. His early works in the style of Salvator Rosa with a restricted palette of warm and subtle browns, ochres and olive greens were most sought after by eighteenth-century collectors. Conisbee compared the „broad and brushy facture“ of the Louvre version with the 1737 “Tivoli Waterfalls” in the Cleveland Museum of Art (121 x 170 cm, Ingersoll-Smouse n°554) or „even closer“, with the 1738 “Rocky Landscape in Italy“, in the Dulwich Picture Gallery (119 x 170 cm, Ingersoll-Smouse n°466), which are the earliest known dated works from the Italian period.1 The present work, a slightly smaller variant of the Louvre painting (canvas 124 x 160 cm, Inv. 8332), reappeared in the mid-1960s and was purchased by the Canadian George Encil, who had his important art collection published in 1989. The painting shows compared to the Louvre version a less detailed execution in the rocks which appear broader in touch - according to Conisbee characteristic for early works like the dated Dulwich landscape. Other details as the treatment of the sky, the town in the background, the figures and technical aspects like the opaque green touches to structure the dark parts of the grotto and the red preparation of the canvas are virtually identical to the Louvre version. The same composition on a narrower format is achieved by slight variations, visible for instance by the changed position of the person leading a donkey in relation to the cracks in the rock behind. Vernet reused the Neptune’s Grotto as a setting for his famous work “Les Baigneuses” 1759, 66.5 x 82.5 cm (Lempertz Cologne, 17 november 2006, lot 1332 – provenance: Sotheby’s London, 5 july 1995, lot 83 - British Rail Pension Fund collection), where the background is changed to a marine with a romantic sunset in a palette typical for his mature style. The illustrious provenance of the present work has only recently been entirely traced: 1740 Vernet traveled with the Comte de Quinson, one of his first patrons who became a close friend and acquired two important landscapes, leading the artist’s “Livre de Raison – Reçus” as entry n°1.2 These two pictures, one of them described as “Cascatelles de Tivoli”, remained in the collection of his heir Eugène de Montlaur (1815-1895)3. His son, the 7th Vicomte de Montlaur, Humbert-Eugène (1850-1931) died without direct descendants. The estate went in the 1960s to his nephew Joseph de Boutray (1895-1977) who dispersed the art collection and finally sold Chateau de Lyonne in 1976.4 1 Letter to Guillaume Faroult, Curator of paintings, Musée du Louvre, 02 november 2003 2 Livre de Reçus, published by Lagrange 1864, p.359 : “1. Pour M. le comte de Quinson deux tableaux en toile d’empereur un une cascade et l’autre une Marine…120 Ecus romains” According to Lagrange both men had a close relationship, proven by the correspondence in possession of the Montlaur family by 1864. 3 Lagrange 1864, p.483 : “Chez le marquis Eug.de Montlaur [Humbert-Eugène-Léopold de VILLARDI QUINSON de MONTLAUR,1850 -1931] Naufrage – Pêche du thon – Les Blanchisseuses. Chez le même, au château de Lyonne, près Vichy : Cascatelles de Tivoli – Côtes de la Méditerranée, route de la corniche. – voir page 26” 4 Hervé de Montlaur (e-mail communication, 15 oct. 2010) Bibliography : L.Lagrange, Joseph Vernet, sa vie et son oeuvre, Paris 1858 L.Lagrange, Joseph Vernet et la peinture du XVIIIème siècle, Paris 1864, p.26-27, 359, 483 F.Ingersoll-Smouse, Joseph Vernet peintre de marine 1714-89, vol.1, Paris 1926, p.18 + 111, no 467; n°41 Ph.Conisbee, Salvator Rosa and Claude-Joseph Vernet, Burlington Magazine, n.849, december 1973, pp.789 Ph.Conisbee, Joseph Vernet 1714–1789, exhibition catalogue Kenwood 1976 and Musée de la Marine, Paris 1977 V.Prat, Experience and Adventures of a Collector, The George Encil Collection, Paris 1989, pp.182 + 428 ; V.Prat, La fascinante collection de l’inventeur des téléskis, Supplément Arts Figaro-Magazine, nouvelle série n°31, Paris, 25 june 1988; G.Faroult, Le tableau du mois no.107: vue d’une cascade à traverse des rochers, dite „Vue des cascatelles de Tivoli“ de Joseph Vernet, Musée du Louvre, Paris 2004, Provenance: 1740 Henri Joseph Eugène de Villardi, Comte de Quinson, Marquis de Montlaur 1864 collection Eugène de Montlaur, Chateau de Lyonne / Vichy 1931 Joseph de Boutray, Paris 1966 with Galerie Heim-Gairac, Paris by 1989 George Encil collection, Bahamas 1990 Sotheby’s London where acquired by Prof. Dr. Friedhelm Beuker, Düsseldorf Meerbusch 1995 Lempertz Cologne Private collection, Germany JOSEPH VERNET painted several views of the Roman Campagna, in particular the locations around Tivoli. Eighteenth-century critics admired in his landscapes the "truth" they were looking for, as stated with enthusiasm by La Font de Saint-Yenne in his commentary on the Salon of 1746, where Vernet was exhibiting for the first time. Diderot praised the picturesque effects, the play of light and water, that „science of effect“ in the artist’s work, commenting 1767 that one could "visit" a painting by Vernet just as one may visit a natural site. Vernet painted three variants of “Vue des Cascatelles de Tivoli”, one of them today in the Louvre. Not an accurate depiction of the actual site, the subject is an imaginary composition based on a view of the famous Neptune’s Grotto at Tivoli. Philip Conisbee, the late Vernet specialist who prepared a critical catalogue raisonné, dated the composition as early in Vernet’s roman career. The 20 year old artist arrived 1734 in Rome, first trips to Tivoli and Naples are reported 1737. His early works in the style of Salvator Rosa with a restricted palette of warm and subtle browns, ochres and olive greens were most sought after by eighteenth-century collectors. Conisbee compared the „broad and brushy facture“ of the Louvre version with the 1737 “Tivoli Waterfalls” in the Cleveland Museum of Art (121 x 170 cm, Ingersoll-Smouse n°554) or „even closer“, with the 1738 “Rocky Landscape in Italy“, in the Dulwich Picture Gallery (119 x 170 cm, Ingersoll-Smouse n°466), which are the earliest known dated works from the Italian period.1 The present work, a slightly smaller variant of the Louvre painting (canvas 124 x 160 cm, Inv. 8332), reappeared in the mid-1960s and was purchased by the Canadian George Encil, who had his important art collection published in 1989. The painting shows compared to the Louvre version a less detailed execution in the rocks which appear broader in touch - according to Conisbee characteristic for early works like the dated Dulwich landscape. Other details as the treatment of the sky, the town in the background, the figures and technical aspects like the opaque green touches to structure the dark parts of the grotto and the red preparation of the canvas are virtually identical to the Louvre version. The same composition on a narrower format is achieved by slight variations, visible for instance by the changed position of the person leading a donkey in relation to the cracks in the rock behind. Vernet reused the Neptune’s Grotto as a setting for his famous work “Les Baigneuses” 1759, 66.5 x 82.5 cm (Lempertz Cologne, 17 november 2006, lot 1332 – provenance: Sotheby’s London, 5 july 1995, lot 83 - British Rail Pension Fund collection), where the background is changed to a marine with a romantic sunset in a palette typical for his mature style. The illustrious provenance of the present work has only recently been entirely traced: 1740 Vernet traveled with the Comte de Quinson, one of his first patrons who became a close friend and acquired two important landscapes, leading the artist’s “Livre de Raison – Reçus” as entry n°1.2 These two pictures, one of them described as “Cascatelles de Tivoli”, remained in the collection of his heir Eugène de Montlaur (1815-1895)3. His son, the 7th Vicomte de Montlaur, Humbert-Eugène (1850-1931) died without direct descendants. The estate went in the 1960s to his nephew Joseph de Boutray (1895-1977) who dispersed the art collection and finally sold Chateau de Lyonne in 1976.4 1 Letter to Guillaume Faroult, Curator of paintings, Musée du Louvre, 02 november 2003 2 Livre de Reçus, published by Lagrange 1864, p.359 : “1. Pour M. le comte de Quinson deux tableaux en toile d’empereur un une cascade et l’autre une Marine…120 Ecus romains” According to Lagrange both men had a close relationship, proven by the correspondence in possession of the Montlaur family by 1864. 3 Lagrange 1864, p.483 : “Chez le marquis Eug.de Montlaur [Humbert-Eugène-Léopold de VILLARDI QUINSON de MONTLAUR,1850 -1931] Naufrage – Pêche du thon – Les Blanchisseuses. Chez le même, au château de Lyonne, près Vichy : Cascatelles de Tivoli – Côtes de la Méditerranée, route de la corniche. – voir page 26” 4 Hervé de Montlaur (e-mail communication, 15 oct. 2010) Bibliography : L.Lagrange, Joseph Vernet, sa vie et son oeuvre, Paris 1858 L.Lagrange, Joseph Vernet et la peinture du XVIIIème siècle, Paris 1864, p.26-27, 359, 483 F.Ingersoll-Smouse, Joseph Vernet peintre de marine 1714-89, vol.1, Paris 1926, p.18 + 111, no 467; n°41 Ph.Conisbee, Salvator Rosa and Claude-Joseph Vernet, Burlington Magazine, n.849, december 1973, pp.789 Ph.Conisbee, Joseph Vernet 1714–1789, exhibition catalogue Kenwood 1976 and Musée de la Marine, Paris 1977 V.Prat, Experience and Adventures of a Collector, The George Encil Collection, Paris 1989, pp.182 + 428 ; V.Prat, La fascinante collection de l’inventeur des téléskis, Supplément Arts Figaro-Magazine, nouvelle série n°31, Paris, 25 june 1988; G.Faroult, Le tableau du mois no.107: vue d’une cascade à traverse des rochers, dite „Vue des cascatelles de Tivoli“ de Joseph Vernet, Musée du Louvre, Paris 2004, Provenance:, 1740 Henri Joseph Eugène de Villardi, Comte de Quinson, Marquis de Montlaur, 1864 collection Eugène de Montlaur, Chateau de Lyonne / Vichy, 1931 Joseph de Boutray, Paris, 1966 with Galerie Heim-Gairac, Paris, by 1989 George Encil collection, Bahamas, 1990 Sotheby’s London, where acquired by Prof. Dr. Friedhelm Beuker, Düsseldorf Meerbusch, 1995 Lempertz Cologne, Private collection, Germany, JOSEPH VERNET painted several views of the Roman Campagna, in particular the locations around Tivoli. Eighteenth-century critics admired in his landscapes the "truth" they were looking for, as stated with enthusiasm by La Font de Saint-Yenne in his commentary on the Salon of 1746, where Vernet was exhibiting for the first time. Diderot praised the picturesque effects, the play of light and water, that „science of effect“ in the artist’s work, commenting 1767 that one could "visit" a painting by Vernet just as one may visit a natural site. Vernet painted three variants of “Vue des Cascatelles de Tivoli”, one of them today in the Louvre. Not an accurate depiction of the actual site, the subject is an imaginary composition based on a view of the famous Neptune’s Grotto at Tivoli. Philip Conisbee, the late Vernet specialist who prepared a critical catalogue raisonné, dated the composition as early in Vernet’s roman career. The 20 year old artist arrived 1734 in Rome, first trips to Tivoli and Naples are reported 1737. His early works in the style of Salvator Rosa with a restricted palette of warm and subtle browns, ochres and olive greens were most sought after by eighteenth-century collectors. Conisbee compared the „broad and brushy facture“ of the Louvre version with the 1737 “Tivoli Waterfalls” in the Cleveland Museum of Art (121 x 170 cm, Ingersoll-Smouse n°554) or „even closer“, with the 1738 “Rocky Landscape in Italy“, in the Dulwich Picture Gallery (119 x 170 cm, Ingersoll-Smouse n°466), which are the earliest known dated works from the Italian period.1, 1, The present work, a slightly smaller variant of the Louvre painting (canvas 124 x 160 cm, Inv. 8332), reappeared in the mid-1960s and was purchased by the Canadian George Encil, who had his important art collection published in 1989. The painting shows compared to the Louvre version a less detailed execution in the rocks which appear broader in touch - according to Conisbee characteristic for early works like the dated Dulwich landscape. Other details as the treatment of the sky, the town in the background, the figures and technical aspects like the opaque green touches to structure the dark parts of the grotto and the red preparation of the canvas are virtually identical to the Louvre version. The same composition on a narrower format is achieved by slight variations, visible for instance by the changed position of the person leading a donkey in relation to the cracks in the rock behind. Vernet reused the Neptune’s Grotto as a setting for his famous work “Les Baigneuses” 1759, 66.5 x 82.5 cm (Lempertz Cologne, 17 november 2006, lot 1332 – provenance: Sotheby’s London, 5 july 1995, lot 83 - British Rail Pension Fund collection), where the background is changed to a marine with a romantic sunset in a palette typical for his, mature style. The illustrious provenance of the present work has only recently been entirely traced:, The illustrious provenance of the present work has only recently been entirely traced:, 1740 Vernet traveled with the Comte de Quinson, one of his first patrons who became a close friend and acquired two important landscapes, leading the artist’s “Livre de Raison – Reçus” as entry n°1.2, 2, These two pictures, one of them described as “Cascatelles de Tivoli”, remained in the collection of his heir Eugène de Montlaur (1815-1895)3. His son, the 7th Vicomte de Montlaur, Humbert-Eugène (1850-1931) died without direct descendants. The estate went in the 1960s to his nephew Joseph de Boutray (1895-1977) who dispersed the art collection and finally sold Chateau de Lyonne in 1976.4, 3, th, 4, 1 Letter to Guillaume Faroult, Curator of paintings, Musée du Louvre, 02 november 2003 2 Livre de Reçus, published by Lagrange 1864, p.359 : “1. Pour M. le comte de Quinson deux tableaux en toile d’empereur un une cascade et l’autre une Marine…120 Ecus romains” According to Lagrange both men had a close relationship, proven by the correspondence in possession of the Montlaur family by 1864. 3 Lagrange 1864, p.483 : “Chez le marquis Eug.de Montlaur [Humbert-Eugène-Léopold de VILLARDI QUINSON de MONTLAUR,1850 -1931] Naufrage – Pêche du thon – Les Blanchisseuses. Chez le même, au château de Lyonne, près Vichy : Cascatelles de Tivoli – Côtes de la Méditerranée, route de la corniche. – voir page 26” 4 Hervé de Montlaur (e-mail communication, 15 oct. 2010) Bibliography : L.Lagrange, Joseph Vernet, sa vie et son oeuvre, Paris 1858 L.Lagrange, Joseph Vernet et la peinture du XVIIIème siècle, Paris 1864, p.26-27, 359, 483 F.Ingersoll-Smouse, Joseph Vernet peintre de marine 1714-89, vol.1, Paris 1926, p.18 + 111, no 467; n°41 Ph.Conisbee, Salvator Rosa and Claude-Joseph Vernet, Burlington Magazine, n.849, december 1973, pp.789 Ph.Conisbee, Joseph Vernet 1714–1789, exhibition catalogue Kenwood 1976 and Musée de la Marine, Paris 1977 V.Prat, Experience and Adventures of a Collector, The George Encil Collection, Paris 1989, pp.182 + 428 ; V.Prat, La fascinante collection de l’inventeur des téléskis, Supplément Arts Figaro-Magazine, nouvelle série n°31, Paris, 25 june 1988; G.Faroult, Le tableau du mois no.107: vue d’une cascade à traverse des rochers, dite „Vue des cascatelles de Tivoli“ de Joseph Vernet, Musée du Louvre, Paris 2004, 1 Letter to Guillaume Faroult, Curator of paintings, Musée du Louvre, 02 november 2003, 2 Livre de Reçus, published by Lagrange 1864, p.359 : “1. Pour M. le comte de Quinson deux tableaux en toile d’empereur un une cascade et l’autre une Marine…120 Ecus romains” According to Lagrange both men had a close relationship, proven by the correspondence in possession of the Montlaur family by 1864. 3 Lagrange 1864, p.483 : “Chez le marquis Eug.de Montlaur [Humbert-Eugène-Léopold de VILLARDI QUINSON de MONTLAUR,1850 -1931] Naufrage – Pêche du thon – Les Blanchisseuses. Chez le même, au château de Lyonne, près Vichy : Cascatelles de Tivoli – Côtes de la Méditerranée, route de la corniche. – voir page 26”, 4 Hervé de Montlaur (e-mail communication, 15 oct. 2010), Bibliography :, L.Lagrange, Joseph Vernet, sa vie et son oeuvre, Paris 1858, L.Lagrange, Joseph Vernet et la peinture du XVIIIème siècle, Paris 1864, p.26-27, 359, 483, F.Ingersoll-Smouse, Joseph Vernet peintre de marine 1714-89, vol.1, Paris 1926, p.18 + 111, no 467; n°41, Ph.Conisbee, Salvator Rosa and Claude-Joseph Vernet, Burlington Magazine, n.849, december 1973, pp.789, Ph.Conisbee, Joseph Vernet 1714–1789, exhibition catalogue Kenwood 1976 and Musée de la Marine, Paris 1977, V.Prat, Experience and Adventures of a Collector, The George Encil Collection, Paris 1989, pp.182 + 428 ; V.Prat, La fascinante collection de l’inventeur des téléskis, Supplément Arts Figaro-Magazine, nouvelle série n°31, Paris, 25 june 1988;, G.Faroult, Le tableau du mois no.107: vue d’une cascade à traverse des rochers, dite „Vue des cascatelles de Tivoli“ de Joseph Vernet, Musée du Louvre, Paris 2004, < Zurück, Weiter >Read more

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Franken um 1815

Franken um 1815, Das gewichtige strenge Möbel ist - auch wegen der Verwendung des hier sehr beliebten Kirschbaums - ein bezeichnendes Beispiel für die süddeutsche Möbelkunst des Empire. Die konsequente Verwendung der rechtwinkligen Kubusform und der konstruktive Geist des tektonischen Aufbaus mit seinem klaren Sinn für tragende und lastende Teile sind deutliche Merkmale dieses repräsentativen Stils. Durch die außergewöhnliche Furnierung mit gestreiftem, vertikal angeordnetem Krischbaum- und Palisanderholz, sowie durch die geschweiften Beine mit Löwenklauen und die geschwärzten Profile läßt sich dieses Möbel eindeutig einer Ankleidezimmergarnitur aus der Residenz Eichstätt, heute Stadtmuseum München, zuordnen. 1817 fiel das Fürstbistum und die Residenz Eichstätt an Eugène de Beauharneis (Sohn von Josefine, Kaiserin von Frankreich und Stiefsohn von Napoleon), der den Titel eines Herzogs von Leuchtenberg und eines Fürsten von Eichstatt erhielt. Eugène de Beauharneis bezog die Residenz mit seiner Familie und ließ sie umfassend renovieren und möblieren. Er erwarb 1817 zu diesem Zweck in Regensburg das Inventar des verstorbenen Fürstprimas, von Dahlberg, . 1854 fielen alle Möbel an die bayerische Krone zurück und gelangten zu einem Teil in die königliche Villa nach Regensburg. Im Laufe des 19. Jahrhunderts gelangten die Eichstätter Möbel nach München, von wo aus sie auf verschiedene Schlösser zur Einrichtung verteilt wurden. Lit.: Ottomeyer, H., Zopf- und Biedermeiermöbel, München 1991, Kat.Nr. 44.1-44.4, EUR 22.000,-Read more

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Barfüsserstraße 12
37073 Göttingen
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