Jacques Nève

Jacques Nève is an clockmaker and has been a member of the CNES (Chambre Nationale des Experts Spécialisés en objets d’art et de collection) since 2009. His workshop is located in Braine-le-Château, Belgium.

Jacques Nève offers a selection of clocks dating from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, carefully selected in terms of quality, originality and historical provenance.

The expert horlogist Jacques Nève also provides confidential appraisals for estate settlements, division of family property, insurance coverage and sales purposes. Certificates of authenticity can be provided on request.

Countries
  • Belgium
Objects "Jacques Nève"

Auricoste

French Navy 1950s radio room bulkhead clock of good precision, with four hands: seconds hand, minute hand, hour hand, and secondary hour hand (red) for different time zone. This red hand is easily set so as to show any other time zone selected by the user, or it can simply be hidden behind the main hour hand if not in use. The two blue zones (0 to 3 and 30 to 33 minutes) are the times dedicated to encoded transmissions every hour. The two red zones (15 to 18 and 45 to 48 minutes) are the times dedicated to radio silence for listening to distress signals. Easy adjustment of retard and advance through the dial near the number 3. MN 753 is the inventory number of the Marine Nationale (French Navy), and it bears the signature of AURICOSTE, Horloger de la Marine de l'Etat (Clockmaker to the State Navy). The door seals with a screw key to the right, the same key being used to rewind the clock every 8 days. Strong aluminium body, painted dial, the case being painted on the destination ship for color matching with the local wall. The movement recently cleaned and overhauled. All parts original. All-out diameter 8 ¼ʺ (21cm), all-out depth 4ʺ (8,5cm), Auricoste the firm known to supply all precision clocks and watches to the French Navy for the past 80 years, and to this day. A brief history, Émile thomas, the renowned watchmaker and specialist in marine chronometers, founded his own watch-making company in 1854. In 1889, Joseph Auricoste succeeded É.Thomas. He named the company after himself and devoted his expertise to it, an expertise which would soon be recognized and rewarded at the Universal Exposition in Paris. After the Second World War, Auricoste took on a completely new dimension. At this time, Pierre Auricoste, who was continuing the work of his father Joseph, began collaborating with Patek Philippe. Together they installed their first time-keeping network (electro-mechanical) on the French Navy’s Warships. The 1950s saw the beginning of an extremely successful period of collaboration between Auricoste and the French Army. The French War Ministry ordered that the chronographs being used at that time by its military units had to include a flyback function ("retour en vol" in French and "taylor" in Italian). Auricoste, already well-known for its reliability and its expertise in this field, received orders for more than 2000 chronographs from the different divisions of the French Air Force and Navy and the French flight test center. The highest administrations, such as the Elysée Palace and the French Senate, as well as the French Merchant Navy and numerous liners, also used the exceptional time-keeping pieces by Auricoste. The Foch and Clemenceau Aircraft Carriers, the Avisos, the Frigate 2000, and the Nuclear Attack Submarines all appear on the illustrious list of warships which were equipped with the Auricoste time-keeping network. Crossing the world on French Warships, the reputation of the watch-making company was no longer limited to the French mainland. Numerous orders were received from foreign military services. And although it was on the waves that Auricoste won glory and fame, it was not long before Air Forces from all over the world began to equip themselves with Auricoste devices. € 4.500,-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
3 900 GBP

Barbedienne

Ferdinand BARBEDIENNE and Louis-Constant SÉVIN, orientalist garniture, circa 1860, gilt bronze and cloisonné enamel garniture of orientalist inspiration, rectangular-shaped case clock with four lions’ paws, and four Assyrian-type men’s masks on the corners, and surmounted by a large offerings’ cup with side handles. The two candelabra on the sides with similar Assyrian-type men’s masks, shields and other Assyrian- or ancient Greek-inspired decorations, three branches for the candles. Numerous cloisonné enamel decorations on large surfaces, with several signatures of F. BARBEDIENNE on the top of the clock, the dial and both candelabra. cloisonné, garniture, The dial also in cloisonné enamel, with the Roman hour numerals as separate medallions, spade gilt hands. French Paris movement, made and signed Ch. Boye, with pendulum and movement bearing the same 3311 serial movement, half-rollers Brocot escapement with steel suspension, hours and half-hours rack strike on a silvered bell. Paris, Brocot, H: 12½ʺ (32cm); W: 12¼ʺ (31cm); D: 6½ʺ (17cm) Height of the candelabra: 18¼ʺ (46cm), Louis-Constant Sévin, Louis-Constant Sévin was a French ornementalist sculptor and was the closest associate of the bronzier Ferdinand Barbedienne from 1855 until 1888. He played an important role in bringing together Art and Industry in the 19th Century Decorative Arts. He was extremely prolific and literally produced hundreds of models, a large number of them of orientalist inspiration. Ferdinand Barbedienne, th, His close association with Ferdinand Barbedienne was within his ideas of creating beauty in an industrial environment, “Beauty within Usefulness”. With the help of the chafer Désiré Attarge (1820-1878), Louis-Constant Sévin universally established the reputation of the Barbedienne workshops in the creation of bronzes in the decorative arts, and was widely acclaimed at several universal exhibitions between 1855 and 1889. € 13.000Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
11 400 GBP

Manberger

Carriage Clock with Simulated-Bamboo Case signed Enrique Manberger Madrid, mid- to late 19th Century. The movement with maltese crosses on both winders and alarum, for better timekeeping, English-style crabtooth-escapement platform with cut bi-metallic balance wheel and gold adjusting screws. Hourly and half-hourly gong strike with repeat feature by a button on top of the case. Alarum striking the same gong. Eight-days autonomy. Hexagonal dials, with nickelled and gilded ‘bamboo’ borders, on a silvered and gilt-brass ground reminiscent of ivory. Porcelain dials with Arabic numerals, each within a finely crafted cartouche. Arbalète or ‘crossbow’ blued-steel hands indicating the hours, minutes and the alarm on the subsidiary dial. Signature Enrique Manberger MADRID (clockmaker/retailer); produced in France. The case, with bevelled glass on five sides allows view of entire movement, assembled with intersecting ‘bamboo poles’, gilded and nickelled for a nice contrast-enhancing effect. Original leather storage box; original double-ended winding key. Height with handle upright: 19.5 cm (7 ½ in); Width: 10 cm (3 7/8 in); Depth: 9 cm (3 ½ in). LP is the signature of Paris-based clockmaker Louis-Auguste Pointeaux (1809-1885). He invented a coup perdu escapement that was used on mantel clocks with half-seconds beating pendulums, and some very sophisticated travelling clocks with up to 12 winding holes (!). He exhibited in London in 1852. He created the large longcase clock, presently at rue de Rivoli in Paris, for the firm C. Detouche. He was established at Rue Chérubini from 1850 to 1880. coup perdu, Tardy, Dictionnaire des horlogers français, (Paris, 1972); Derek Roberts, Carriage and Other Travelling Clocks, (Shiffer, Atglen, 1993). € 6500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
5 700 GBP

Satyr and Bacchante, after Pradier

Ed. Detalle, an important mantel clock, "Satyr and Bacchante" after James Pradier (1790-1852), made in Paris c. 1870. Inscribed ‘Pradier’ in cursive script on front of base; no foundry mark. Signed on the dial: Ed. Detalle, Rue St Antoine 180, Près la Rue de Rivoli. Bronze group with light brown patination; reduction of the original marble by James Pradier, now in the Louvre (R.F. 3475); it rests on a black Mazy marble pedestal flanked by two volute-shaped capitals, the corners decorated with fluted pilasters in vert-de-mer marble. Half-man, half-goat, the satyr is depicted with horns, hoofs and a tail. With one knee on the ground, the satyr supports on his thigh a swooning female figure and with his free hand removes the light garment that covered her. In a state of rapture, she seems to both push him away and draw him close. Depicted in a posture of sensual surrender, the Bacchante has abandoned her attributes: the thyrsus and drinking cup; on the base the discarded thyrsus rests alongside a tambourine. French movement with two spring barrels; the time train on the right side with spring suspension adjustable from the front of the dial and self-levelling escapement, both patents from Achille Brocot, visible anchor and escape wheel, with jewel half-rollers; the strike train on the left side for every half hour on a silvered bell, countwheel. Enamel dial on two levels, separated by an ormolu circle, the outer with Roman numerals for the hours and fine graduation for the minutes, the inner with the visible escapement, the two Breguet-style blued steel hands, and the signature Ed. Detalle, Rue St Antoine 180, Près la Rue de Rivoli. All the visible metallic parts in either polished steel or ormolu, the escape wheel in brass. Front and rear bevelled flat glass. (more on the sculpture in the Pdf file below), H: 51cm (20"), W: 48cm (19"), D: 28cm (11¼") Bronze sculpture: H: 30cm (12"), W: 34cm (13½"), D: 19cm (8"), Tardy, Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Paris, 1972 ; Statues de Chair, sculptures de James Pradier, Musée d’Art et d’Histoire, Genève 1985 ; Claude Lapaire, James Pradier et la sculpture française de la génération romantique, catalogue raisonné, SIK-ISEA Institut Suisse pour l’Etude de l’Art, 2010. Louvre Museum, Paris; Musée d'Orsay, Paris; Montpellier Fine Arts Museum; Geneva Fine Arts Museum, and many more. € 6.500,-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
5 700 GBP

Vrard SHANGHAI

L.VRARD & Co, SHANGHAI, carriage clock with engraved and gilt Gorge case, with center-sweeping seconds hand, second half of the 19th Century. The silvered platform with English-type crabtooth escapement and cut bi-metallic balance wheel. Half-hourly rack strike on a silvered bell at the rear, with repeat button on top at the front of the case. Alarum on a bell situated below. Autonomy 8 days. Enamel dial with Roman numerals for the hours, with signature L.Vrard & Co, Shanghai. Breguet blued steel hands with a large center-sweeping seconds hand. Breguet, Finely engraved and gilt Gorge case with bevelled glass on five sides allowing for a good view of the movement from all sides, the retailer’s name in Chinese is indicated on the rear movement plate. Gorge, Carriage clocks with center-sweeping seconds hands are rare as this feature added complexity to their design. The Chinese market of the 19th Century was eager for them as this made the clock alive, as time was thus visible with the naked eye. Another unusual feature on this clock is the presence of TWO separate bells, for the strike and alarum, an unexpected refinement. alive, . Height 19cm (7 ½”) with handle up, Width 9,5cm (3 ¾”), Depth 8,5cm (3 ¼”), Charles Allix and Peter Bonnert, Carriage Clocks, their History and development, The Antique’s Collector’s Club, 1974. Carriage Clocks, their History and development, € 6500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
5 700 GBP

Sam Brown, Edinburgh

SAM BROWN Edinburgh, Scottish floor standing regulator of small size, circa 1780, circular silvered brass dial with Arabic numerals for the five minutes and Roman numerals for the hours, an inner circle marking the days of the month also with Arabic numerals. Blued steel hands for the hours and minutes, polished brass hand ending with a moon for the day indications. Subsidiary dial above the center with sweeping seconds hand. Horizontal signature Sam Brown Edin.r. Weight driven movement with tapering plates cast with 'feet' united by three turned pillars, with deadbeat escapement overlapping the top pillar, the pendulum suspended from a steel arm traversing the top of the plates. Case with broken arched pediment and carved dentil cornice centered by a brass finial on freestanding reeded Doric columns, the trunk with chamfered front angles and terminating in shaped and carved protrusions to accept the swing of the pendulum bob, on a tall base of particularly good colour and figure, on bracket feet, solid Cuban mahogany and mahogany veneer on oak, lock and key for the lower door, a secret locks the upper door. Sam Brown Edin.r, H. 6’ 1” 1/4 (186 cm), L. 18” 1/8 (46 cm), P. 14” 3/16 (36 cm), Edinburgh, member of the Clockmaker’s Company, 1750-1787 ; son of John Brown (1720-1750) ; associated with George Skelton, 1787. In 1756, Samuel Brown delivered to the subscribers of the Caledonian Mercury a popular treatise on Astronomy by James Ferguson. He was admitted to the Incorporation of Hammermen in 1757. This Incorporation, whose origins are as old as Scotland’s, was very active from the 16th Century, especially in Dundee where gold-, silver- and gunsmiths were established in great numbers. More than thirty crafts figure in the Hammerman records such as Armourer, Bucklemaker, Blacksmith, Gunsmith, Goldsmith, Silversmith, Jeweller, Clocksmith, Watchmaker, Knocksmith, Cutler, Sword Slipper, Locksmith, Farrier, Saddler, Lorimer, Brassfounder, Plumber, Pewterer, Guardmaker and Potter. All were “metalsmiths” and practiced the art of metal hammering. This Incorporation played a very active role in the Regional and National economic development until the middle of the 19th Century and the advent of the industrial era. The rules of membership of this Incorporation were very strict, but in return its members benefited from an excellent reputation and a good level of social security. As reported in the Edinburgh Hammermen Records, Samuel Brown "compared and presented his essay, being a watch movement made and finished in his own shop, as William Nicol, landlord, Deacon Dalgleish, William Auld, and James Cowan, essay masters declared, which essay was found to be a well wrought essay, etc, and he was therefore admitted a freeman clock and watch maker in the Incorporation.", Caledonian Mercury, 25th September 1756 ; Edinburgh Hammermen Records, 1757 ; G.H. Baillie, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, Methuen & Co London, 1929. € 15000.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
13 100 GBP

Scientific and Observation Chronometer, Auricoste

JOSEPH AURICOSTE, Observation Chronometer of small size, for scientific or military use, mahogany case, France, circa 1890. Enamel dial with Arabic numerals for every 10 units, auxiliary for the minutes and central-sweeping seconds hand. 2/3 plate movement, pivoted detent escapement, gold screw compensation balance, autonomy 30 hours. Mahogany case with double opening: to the top for exposing the dial, to the bottom for exposing the winding rear of the movement with a double shutter protecting the winding and the setting arbors. Ivory plate on the case with the signature J Auricoste, Horloger de la Marine, 10 Rue la Boétie, Paris. J Auricoste, Horloger de la Marine, 10 Rue la Boétie, Paris. H. 1 3/4" (4,5 cm); W. 3 1/4" (8 cm); D. 4 3/4" (12 cm), Émile Thomas, the renowned watchmaker and specialist in marine chronometers, founded his own watch-making company in 1854. In 1889, Joseph Auricoste succeeded Émile Thomas. He named the company after himself and devoted his expertise to it, an expertise which would soon be recognised and rewarded at the Universal Exposition in Paris. After WW II, Auricoste took on a completely new dimension. By this time, Pierre Auricoste, who was continuing the work of his father Joseph, began collaborating with Patek Philippe. Together they installed their first time-keeping network (electro-mechanical) on the French Navy’s Warships. The Company Auricoste still exists today and produces wristwatches. € 3.900.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
3 400 GBP

Parkinson & Frodsham

Bracket clock with precision visible deadbeat escapement, signed Parkinson & Frodsham, LONDON. George III Period, circa 1810. Movement with two fusees and gutline transmission, Graham-type precision deadbeat escapement visible from the rear, spring suspended pendulum with adjustment above the bob, the rod made of pine wood for minimizing the temperature disturbance. Hourly rack strike on a vertical bronze bell at the rear, with pull-repeat on the right-hand side. Finely engraved rear plate. Autonomy 8 days. Painted dial with black Roman numerals for the hours, on white background. Subsidiary dial for the seconds below the numeral XII. Finely cut blued steel hands. Oak case with ebonized pear tree veneer with varnished applied bronze lining and accessories. Front and side panels finely cut in the fish scales fashion, with red silk back lining, allowing for the sound to go through while keeping the dust outside. Ormolu feet, handle and bezel. Height 41 cm (16”), Width 28 cm (11”), Depth 19 cm (7 ½”), William PARKINSON and William James FRODSHAM were associated for fifty years, between the years 1800 and 1850. First established in Liverpool, then in London, they had an excellent reputation as clockmakers, as well as marine chronometer makers. Their workshop continued to produce fine timepieces right up to 1947. Richard Barder, The Georgian Bracket Clock 1714-1830, 1993; G.H.Baillie, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, 1925; F.J.Britten, Old Clocks and Watches & Their Makers, 1904; Tony Mercer, Chronometer Makers of the World, revised edition 2004. € 9.500,-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
8 300 GBP

R.A.F WWII Sector Clock

Mahogany wall fusee timepiece for the Royal Air Force, "Operations Room Clock", dated and stamped 1938. Painted flat dial with Arabic numerals for the five minutes on the outer ring, the minute graduations, the twelve hours within the coloured triangles, and the 24 hours on the inner ring. Old style King's Crown RAF Warrant Officer's insignia below the number 24, blued steel hands, cast bezel, painted black outside and silvered inside, turned black tinted mahogany outer with a flat thick bevelled glass. Single chain fusee movement with rectangular plates united by four massive screwed pillars, recoil anchor escapement. Autonomy 8 days. Originally known as "colour change clocks", they were introduced during the First World War by the Royal Flying Corps in 1917 to monitor the movements of German aircraft. Later, during the Second World War they played a significant role in the Battle of Britain and continued to be used by the Royal Air Force and Royal Observer Corps (ROC) as simple clocks and keepsakes, until the end of the Cold War period. The Sector Clock was a fundamental part of Ground-controlled interception before modern computerized systems were put in place for airspace control. The clock dial is marked with five-minute red, yellow and blue triangular segments. It has an outer 12-hour ring and an inner 24-hour dial. Aircraft position was recorded along with the colour of the triangle beneath the minute hand at the time of sighting. This was reported to sector headquarters, where counters of the relayed colour were used to represent each air raid on a large table with a map of the UK overlaid with a British Modified Grid. As the plots of the raiding aircraft moved, the counters were pushed across the map by magnetic "rakes". This system enabled "Fighter Controllers" to see very quickly where each formation was heading and allowed an estimate to be made of possible targets. The age of the information was readily apparent from the colour of the counter. Because of the simplicity of the system, decisions could be made quickly and easily. It was possible, according to reports from system veterans, to have fighters in the air and on their way to an intercept within five minutes of the initial contact. Without the simple yet elegant time coding system devised by the RAF, the British might not have been so successful in holding control of the skies over Britain during the crucial Battle of Britain as well as later in the war. External diameter 18 ½ ” (47 cm), dial diameter 14” (36cm), overall depth 7 1/2 ” (19cm), T.W.Elliott Ltd, T.W.Elliott Ltd: the firm of Elliott’s started in 1886 with James Jones Elliott, having served his apprenticeship with Bateman of Smithfield, naming the company J.J.Elliott Ltd, at Percival St, Clerkenwell. James’ son and successor Frank sold off the name in 1923, amalgamated with the firm Gillett & Johnson Ltd to form the company now known as F.W.Elliott Ltd, taking over all the domestic production from Gillett’s. Frank’s three sons all joined the company, Horace in 1919, Ronald in 1929 and Leonard in 1946. At the outbreak of WWII in 1939 the production of clocks was temporarily reduced and the factory made test gear and apparatus for Rolls-Royce Merlin engines used on Spitfire aeroplanes. Frank Westcombe Elliott died in 1944, aged 69. The company still makes quality clocks and is based in Hastings. Ronald E Rose, English Dial Clocks, Antique’s Collectors’Club, revised and reprinted 2000; Wikipedia; Ned Frederick “The Clock that saved Great Britain”, € 9.500Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
8 300 GBP

Constantin Detouche

Precision Table Regulator with perpetual calendar, circa 1850, signed on the dial and on the rear movement plate C. DETOUCHE, FSEUR DE L’EMPEREUR, RUE ST MARTIN 228 & 230, PARIS. C. DETOUCHE, FSEUR DE L’EMPEREUR, SEUR, RUE ST MARTIN 228 & 230, PARIS. T, The base and the top of the case in white marble, the four sides with bevelled glass allowing for a good view of the complete dial and movement through the sides and rear. Two doors, front and rear, allow for easy access to all controls and parts. The top dial with external ring for hour Roman numerals and outer division for minutes and seconds, the centre with the visible Brocot cornaline half-roller pallets, above the signature. Three concentric blued steel hands for the hours, minutes and center-sweeping half-seconds, following the beat of the pendulum. Brocot, The lower dial with the full perpetual calendar showing the months, the days of the week, the day of the month and the moonphases. The day of the month automatically corrects for the shorter months and thus takes the correct action on 28-, 29- (for leap years), 30-, or 31-days months. Both movements of remarkable quality, as expected of any work coming from Constantin Detouche’s workshop, and the perpetual calendar is of his own design, not wanting to pay for the Brocot perpetual calendar patents. Some bridges carry the initilas “GH” stamped on the reverse, possibly the mark of the clockmaker who made the calendar. Steel suspension adjustable from the front, the hands very unusually being set through a handle from the rear, the calendar settings ditto, the front door thus never needs opening. Compensated temperature Ellicott – type pendulum. Two-weeks autonomy. ditto, Ellicott, 19½ʺ (50cm) , W. 12½ʺ (32cm), D. 9½ʺ (24cm), (1810-1889) was an extraordinarily gifted and prolific clockmaker, and he designed and produced numerous complicated clocks. His shop and workshop were set up in the Rue Saint-Martin in Paris, and he is recognized as one of the great 19th C. French clockmakers. th, Tardy, Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Paris, 1972 ; Derek Roberts, Continental and American Skeleton Clocks, Schiffer, 1989. Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Continental and American Skeleton Clocks, € 14,000.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
12 200 GBP

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Jacques Nève
Rue des Fonds 2
1440 Braine-le-Château
+32 477 27 19 08
jneve@horloger.net
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