Jacques Nève

Jacques Nève is an clockmaker and has been a member of the CNES (Chambre Nationale des Experts Spécialisés en objets d’art et de collection) since 2009. His workshop is located in Braine-le-Château, Belgium.

Jacques Nève offers a selection of clocks dating from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, carefully selected in terms of quality, originality and historical provenance.

The expert horlogist Jacques Nève also provides confidential appraisals for estate settlements, division of family property, insurance coverage and sales purposes. Certificates of authenticity can be provided on request.

Countries
  • Belgium
Objects "Jacques Nève"

Constantin Detouche

Precision Table Regulator with perpetual calendar, circa 1850, signed on the dial and on the rear movement plate C. DETOUCHE, FSEUR DE L’EMPEREUR, RUE ST MARTIN 228 & 230, PARIS. C. DETOUCHE, FSEUR DE L’EMPEREUR, SEUR, RUE ST MARTIN 228 & 230, PARIS. T, The base and the top of the case in white marble, the four sides with bevelled glass allowing for a good view of the complete dial and movement through the sides and rear. Two doors, front and rear, allow for easy access to all controls and parts. The top dial with external ring for hour Roman numerals and outer division for minutes and seconds, the centre with the visible Brocot cornaline half-roller pallets, above the signature. Three concentric blued steel hands for the hours, minutes and center-sweeping half-seconds, following the beat of the pendulum. Brocot, The lower dial with the full perpetual calendar showing the months, the days of the week, the day of the month and the moonphases. The day of the month automatically corrects for the shorter months and thus takes the correct action on 28-, 29- (for leap years), 30-, or 31-days months. Both movements of remarkable quality, as expected of any work coming from Constantin Detouche’s workshop, and the perpetual calendar is of his own design, not wanting to pay for the Brocot perpetual calendar patents. Some bridges carry the initilas “GH” stamped on the reverse, possibly the mark of the clockmaker who made the calendar. Steel suspension adjustable from the front, the hands very unusually being set through a handle from the rear, the calendar settings ditto, the front door thus never needs opening. Compensated temperature Ellicott – type pendulum. Two-weeks autonomy. ditto, Ellicott, 19½ʺ (50cm) , W. 12½ʺ (32cm), D. 9½ʺ (24cm), (1810-1889) was an extraordinarily gifted and prolific clockmaker, and he designed and produced numerous complicated clocks. His shop and workshop were set up in the Rue Saint-Martin in Paris, and he is recognized as one of the great 19th C. French clockmakers. th, Tardy, Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Paris, 1972 ; Derek Roberts, Continental and American Skeleton Clocks, Schiffer, 1989. Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Continental and American Skeleton Clocks, € 14,000.-Read more

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12 600 GBP

Precision table regulator, masterpiece from Francis Breyne

Brussels Professional School of Precision Mechanics And Electricity, precision table regulator, masterpiece from Francis Breyne in 1931. Extremely robust construction movement with thick plates and four large turned pillars screwed on both sides, Graham escapement, steel suspension powered by a mainspring in a barrel allowing for a three-week autonomy. Pine wood rod pendulum with micrometric crutch adjustment, graduated adjustment on the heavy brass bob.The plates nicely machined patterned. Large silvered dial with Roman numerals for the hours, bearing the signature ECOLE PROFELLE DE MÉCANIQUE DE PRÉCISION ET D'ELECTRICITÉ DE BRUXELLES, FRANCIS BREYNE 1931. Two blued steel hands, with polished conical washer at the center. It was traditionally left to the student cabinet-makers of that same prestigious school to make the case, using the best materials and assembly methods of the time. It is made in a very fine manner, using quarter-sawn oak and glasses on four sides, to emphasize the geometrical shapes and to show the movement in its best possible view. Its trapeze shape with stepped decorations and slightly triangular hood, is directly inspired from the clocks cases made by Gustave Serrurier-Bovy (1858-1910), the famous Liège architect and decorator who was a major player in interior designs in Belgium. The detailed plans of most parts for these masterpieces still exist and are reproduced in the PDF files with links below. Height 52 cm, Width 35 cm, Depth 16 cm. that was to become later the Arts and Crafts School of Brussels, held the reputation of being one of the finest clock-making school in the World in the 20th Century years preceding the Second World War. As an end of school project, the students had to entirely manufacture a precision regulator of a given design. They were left with some liberties for some of the execution details, and these finished works were to become their masterpiece, that were to stay with them for the rest of their career, so as to demonstrate their skill, but also to regulate all the other time instruments that they would work on. € 5400.-Read more

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4 900 GBP

Gilt Mirror with Regulator

Large gilt mirror for department stores with precision regulator, United States, circa 1870. Very unusual and large precision regulator in a gilt-framed wooden and stucco mirror, with shell and scrolls decorations above. The whole mirror is mounted on hinges, opening to the pine and hardwood case containing the massive cast-iron base of the clock movement and its accessories. Painted steel dial with Roman numerals for the hours and outside railing for the minutes and seconds. The three hands for the hours, minutes and seconds of blued steel, the seconds hand centre-sweeping. The movement specially made for this unusual decorative mirror, of two thick brass plates held by four turned iron pillars, with two main barrels for a more even and regular motion, powered by two cast-iron weights maintained by wo pulleys each, allowing them a running time of 33 days between windings. A simplified Maltese cross system – typical American Design – will stop overwinding on one end, or a drop of the weights to the bottom of the frame on the other end. Dead-beat Graham-type anchor escapement, steel suspension, polished brass-covered pendulum bob and pinewood pendulum rod. This regulator with a mirror frame, or mirror with a regulator, was very likely made as a special order for a Department Store or a commercial gallery of the period from the East Coast. The type of movement and the way of its fitting into the case is quite typical of American clockmaking of the second half of the 19th C, particularly in Boston or New York. th, Height 91ʺ (2m30), Width 30ʺ (77cm), Depth 11ʺ (28cm), € 9.500,-Read more

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8 500 GBP

Erigone seduced by Bacchus

“Reclining Bacchante”, or "Erigone seduced by Bacchus", exceptional Empire-period Mantle Clock, Paris, circa 1810. Finely chased and gilded bronze, Vert-de-mer marble base with circular feet, movement with round plates and 4 pillars, anchor recoil escapement, and silk-suspended pendulum. Countwheel strike for the hours and half hours on a silvered bell. Autonomy 2 weeks. Lying on a daybed, a female bacchanal figure with a simple drape accentuating her hips holds aloft a cluster of grapes, bringing them voluptuously up to her lips. Arranged around her feet are a tambourine, thyrsus and two ewers – symbols of the Dionysian festivals. Rich ornamental bronze imagery – featuring two opposing lionesses on the façade, grape-filled baskets, a young goat on its hind legs, and musical trophies – occupies a significant part of the frieze décor. The dial signed à Paris is set into the frame of the daybed, the feet of which are in the form of hooves adorned with satyr masks. à Paris, This semi-reclining nymph figure, surrounded by bacchic attributes, makes reference to the tragic love story of Bacchus and Erigone. In the Metamorphosis, Ovid tells the tale of a peasant named Ikarios who lived with his daughter Erigone (“born with the dawn”). Ikarios, unaware of his guest’s identity, plays host to Bacchus, who, in exchange, presents him with a grape vine and teaches him how to transform the fruit into wine. Metamorphosis, Wanting to share this gift with the shepherds of Attica, Ikarios offers them a flask filled with wine, and not knowing its effects they proceed to drink without measure. Furious, and convinced that they have been poisoned, the shepherds club Ikarios to death, abandoning his corpse beneath a tree. Concerned about her father who had been missing for so many days and months, Erigone goes in search of him only to find his dead body. Inconsolable, the young girl hangs herself from the tree which marks her father’s burial place. Erigone is represented here under Love’s spell, in that one delightful moment when she succumbs to Bacchus, who, to seduce her transforms himself into a bunch of grapes. Characteristic of First Empire taste for moral themes of heroism and courage, this tragic subject is expressed here in all its beauty. In its time the ‘reclining bacchante’ theme was considered a decorative-art icon, serving as a model to various master clockmakers who appropriated it to create additional depictions. Among other known versions are three models closely related to ours, the dials respectively signed ‘Le Roy’, ‘Gérard à Paris’, and ‘Blanc fils palais Royal’. By virtue of its quality of the bronze work, our clock figures among the rarest of comparable examples. Le Roy’, ‘Gérard à Paris’, Blanc fils palais Royal’. Provenance: Private collection, Mulhouse, H. 20.4 in (52cm); W.19.3 in (49cm); D.7 in (18cm), Galle, Galle, Fabricant de bronzes et dorures, Rue Colbert no. 1, et Rue Vivienne no. 9 (as stated on his letterhead), became a master in 1786; official supplier to the Emperor furnishing the Royal Palaces of Fontainebleau, Les Tuileries, Compiègne and Rambouillet, he also received commissions for palaces outside France including the Quirinale in Rome and the Stupinigi in Turin. Established at no. 9 Rue Vivienne from 1806 to 1827, Galle grew to become one of the most celebrated bronze makers under Napoleon I. Both maker and retailer, his workshop, which employed almost 400 workers in 1811, was one of the largest in Paris. At the 1806 Exposition des Produits de l’Industrie, Claude Galle was awarded a bronze medal for his mantle clock Friendship concealing Time (L’amitié couvrant les heures), an example of which is now at the Musée du Château de Malmaison. Galle collaborated with Antoine-André Ravrio (1759-1814) and Jean Hauré (master in 1782) on several occasions – his connection with Hauré gave Galle the opportunity to create bronzes for some of Guillaume Benneman’s (1750-1811) cabinetry work intended for the Crown, like the commode with the Queen’s monogram, now housed at the Château de Compiègne. In 1823 Galle received a gold medal for his final participation at the Exposition des Produits de l’Industrie: “Mr. Galle, from Paris, was judged worthy of the gold medal in 1823 for his presentation of a pair of matching figures, a Gladiator and an Achilles, flawlessly executed in bronze; a very beautiful jaspe fleuri (speckled jasp agate) clock, and a vase decorated with gilt bronze work, the mounting of which is affixed by clips which don’t pierce the vase.” Certain works by Galle can be found today in numerous museum collections like those of the Musée National du Château de Malmaison and Musée Marmottan in Paris, the Munich Residenz, and the Victoria & Albert and the Wallace Collection in London. Claude Galle’s only son, Gérard-Jean Galle (1788 - 1846), took over the business. Fabricant de bronzes et dorures, Rue Colbert no. 1, et Rue Vivienne no. 9, Friendship concealing Time, L’amitié couvrant les heures), Gladiator, Achilles, jaspe fleuri, Michael Shapiro, ‘Monsieur Galle, Bronzier et Doreur’, The J. Paul Getty Museum Journal, Vol. 6/7 (1978/1979), pp. 57-74; Louna Zek, ‘Bronzes d’ameublement et meubles français achetés par Paul Ier pour le château Saint-Michel de Saint-Pétersbourg en 1798-99’, Bulletin de la Société de l’Histoire de l’Art Français, 1994; Jean-Dominique Augarde, ‘Une nouvelle vision du bronze et des bronziers sous le Directoire et l'Empire’, L'Estampille-L’Objet d'art, January 2005, no. 398, p. 62-85. The J. Paul Getty Museum Journal, Bulletin de la Société de l’Histoire de l’Art Français, L'Estampille-L’Objet d'art, on requestRead more

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Exceptional carved walnut wall clock – Rossigneux

Exceptional carved walnut wall clock by Charles-François Rossigneux, Paris, circa 1870. The clock dial in waxed and polished walnut, with gothic-style Roman hour chapters painted in white, chased gilt-brass hands; the case, in the form of a heraldic crest resting on a small gadrooned base finished with an acanthus leaf motif; the whole entirely decorated with Neo-Renaissance motifs loosely inspired from Antiquity, flanked on either side by two inverted winged-dragons with reptile-like tails coiled around a chimera mascaron placed in the centre; above, branches of laurel leaves and a horn-shaped vase filled with a pomegranate bouquet surmount the clock. Self-starting movement with horizontal balance wheel, autonomy eight days. Impressive in scale, this clock case is a real tour de force of wood carving, superimposing a proliferation of ornaments that blends naturalistic plant forms with an imaginary universe composed of hybrid creatures and a grotesque mascaron. Graceful yet spirited, with outlandish and powerful accents, its design recalls the decorative vocabulary of the architect and designer Charles-François Rossigneux. This becomes evident when comparing its lines and motifs to a certain number of his original drawings housed at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, in which we see the same motifs: some imaginary, like the open-mouthed dragons, terrifying chimera mascarons and the form of the central crest with emerging serpent-tails; some taken from plant forms, like the clusters of fruit sprays; others inspired from ornamental book illustrations, with compartments and arabesques, for which Rossigneux was well-known. It is precisely in Rossigneux’s hand-drawn illustrations, depicting vignettes, foliage scrolls, tailpieces and ornamental lettering destined for fine-edition publications, that we discovered the source of inspiration for the present clock, notably in the magnificent folio of the Gospels (Les Saints Evangiles) published by Hachette in 1873 (fig.1-2-3): printed in two volumes, the set contains 128 large etchings after original drawings by Alexandre Bida, and 290 steel engravings featuring decorative titles, chapter heads, tailpieces and initials by L. Gaucherel after drawings by Ch. Rossigneux. H 147 cm (58"), W 102 cm (40"), D 26 cm (10"), (Paris, 1818 – 1907). A prolific artist, Rossigneux also designed fine-edition bindings and contributed, from 1860 to 1875, to the major decorating and furnishing projects in Paris. His practice was to supply a highly finished drawing to a sculptor, who, under his direction and close supervision, created a full-scale relief model that would then be reproduced in wood or precious metal. Rossigneux began his career working for the Gruel bookbinding firm, where he was in charge of designing bindings, endeavouring to introduce new elements inspired from nature. His early designs, noted at the 1844 Exposition des produits de l’industrie (French Industrial Exhibition) in Paris, enabled him to go to Cairo, chosen to decorate the apartments of the ‘Abbas’s palace, which the viceroy of Egypt ‘Abbas Pasha had just finished building. He spent three years in the Orient, from 1848-1851, and became friends with the painters Alexandre Bida and Maxime du Camp. While on mission in Egypt, he was able to develop relationships with the most prominent furniture and decorative-arts firms in France, which, upon his return, kept him occupied with important construction and decorating projects. In 1855, Rossigneux was appointed architect and assistant curator at the Exposition universelle (World Fair) in Paris. In the same year he established a privileged working relationship with Christofle, winning a silver medal for a silver cup made after his designs, and undertaking a project for a centrepiece with three winged infants for the Empress’ personal dining table. As of 1860, he worked under the direction of the architect Alfred Normand for several years, decorating Prince Napoleon’s Pompeii-style home, notably designing lamps and large candelabra, as well as bronze work for the Atrium doors. While he was creating designs for silver, Rossigneux was asked, in 1862, to take over as creative director of MM. Hache et Pepin-Lehalleur, the porcelain manufacture located in Vierzon – a collaboration that lasted until 1870. His influence was no less important at the Manufacture des Gobelins, where for over twenty years he acted as member of the Commission de perfectionnement (Committee for advancement). In 1868, the critic Edmond About described him in these terms: ‘M. Charles Rossigneux, an architect of all stripes, constructs homes, decorates apartments, designs furniture, sketches stained-glass windows, and has tableware, crystal, silverware and even Madame’s jewellery, made after his designs […].’ The following pieces date from the most active period of his career, lasting from 1860 to 1875: a Pompeii-style centrepiece for Prince Napoleon (now lost), a Neo-Grec tea service (exhibited in 1867), an ebony jewellery cabinet with inlay and enamel work (1873), a complete silverware service with the Nemean Lion hide as its principal ornamental motif (exhibited in 1875), a salon table with a gold and silver-inlaid top for Mme de Païva’s hôtel particulier on the Champs-Elysées, bronze work for M. Fouret’s private mansion, and marble vases with bronze mounts and Louis XIV chandeliers for M. Armand Templier. While working simultaneously on these numerous pieces, Rossigneux also designed fine jewellery for the goldsmiths Froment-Meurice; designed furniture for Count Henkel von Donnersmark’s castle in the province of Silesia (1887); and lastly, decorated the entire Hachette family’s hôtel particulier, where everything including chandeliers, torchères and bronze mounts were executed after his designs. The striking similarities between the present clock and the designs for the initials and tailpieces for the 1873 edition of Les Evangiles, leads us to believe that the present clock, exceptional in every respect, could have originated from the prestigious Hachette decorative ensemble now lost. Rossigneux, like Feuchère, Vechte and Klagmann, belonged to the same prestigious school, one that has earned a unique place in the decorative arts of the nineteenth century. During an exhibition of Rossigneux’s work at the Pavillon de Marsan (formerly part of the Tuileries Palace), F. de Ribes-Christofle liked to highlight the effects of his style, of which ‘the characteristic lies in the harmony of his compositional variety, the coherence of his design, and, above all, in the distinctive elegance that acts like a hallmark.’ A multi-talented artist, Rossigneux can be counted, along with Constant-Sevin and the furniture designer Fourdinois, as one of the most prominent representatives of the French decorative arts. Countless designs left his workshop to guide the hands of sculptors and goldsmiths who brought to life splendid bindings, tapestries, jewellery, delicate ceramic work, and furniture made for the sole purpose of obtaining prestigious prizes at the World’s Fairs. Bulletin Bibliographique, Gazette des Beaux Arts, 1873, 2e période, p. 564; Léon Deshairs, Charles Rossigneux, architecte décorateur (1818-1907), Gazette des Beaux-Arts, 1908; Jules Guiffrey, Charles-François Rossigneux, architecte et dessinateur (1818-1907), s.n. 1908; M. de Ribes-Christofle, Notice nécrologique sur M. Ch. Rossigneux, Société d’encouragement pour l’industrie nationale, Paris, Extrait du Bulletin de Mars 1908. Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, On requestRead more

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François Frewin

Precision Table Regulator, Masterpiece from François Frewin In 1924, Brussels Professional School Of Precision Mechanics And Electricity. Extremely robust construction movement with thick plates and four large turned pillars screwed on both sides, Graham escapement placed on the lower end of the movement, and thus upside-down, steel suspension, and powered by a mainspring in a barrel allowing for a two-week autonomy. Exceptional three-rod compensated pendulum of an original design inspired by Ellicott, with micrometric crutch adjustment, graduated adjustment on the heavy lead-filled ormolu bob. The plates nicely marble patterned. Large silvered dial with Roman numerals for the hours, bearing the signature ECOLE PROFELLEDE MÉCANIQUE DE PRÉCISION ET D'ELECTRICITÉ DE BRUXELLES, FRANCOIS FREWIN 1924. Two blued steel hands, with polished conical washer at the center. ELLE, Oak case with geometrical inlays of various exotic woods. Height 25ˮ (64cm), Width 14ˮ (36cm), Depth ½ˮ (22cm), that was to become later the Arts and Crafts School of Brussels, held the reputation of being one of the finest clock-making school in the World in the 20th Century years preceding the Second World War. As an end of school project, the students had to entirely manufacture a precision regulator of a given design. They were left with some liberties for some of the execution details, and these finished works were to become their masterpiece, that were to stay with them for the rest of their career, so as to demonstrate their skill, but also to regulate all the other time instruments that they would work on. Arts and Crafts School of Brussels, It was traditionally left to the student cabinet-makers of that same prestigious school to make the case, using the best materials and assembly methods of the time. It is made in a very fine manner, using quarter-sawn oak and glasses on four sides, to emphasize the geometrical shapes and to show the movement in its best possible view. This particular case being the only one known to us, along with the presence of this exceptional pendulum make it very likely that the student François Frewin made his own case as well. € 11.000Read more

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9 900 GBP

Manberger

Carriage Clock with Simulated-Bamboo Case signed Enrique Manberger Madrid, mid- to late 19th Century. The movement with maltese crosses on both winders and alarum, for better timekeeping, English-style crabtooth-escapement platform with cut bi-metallic balance wheel and gold adjusting screws. Hourly and half-hourly gong strike with repeat feature by a button on top of the case. Alarum striking the same gong. Eight-days autonomy. Hexagonal dials, with nickelled and gilded ‘bamboo’ borders, on a silvered and gilt-brass ground reminiscent of ivory. Porcelain dials with Arabic numerals, each within a finely crafted cartouche. Arbalète or ‘crossbow’ blued-steel hands indicating the hours, minutes and the alarm on the subsidiary dial. Signature Enrique Manberger MADRID (clockmaker/retailer); produced in France. The case, with bevelled glass on five sides allows view of entire movement, assembled with intersecting ‘bamboo poles’, gilded and nickelled for a nice contrast-enhancing effect. Original leather storage box; original double-ended winding key. Height with handle upright: 19.5 cm (7 ½ in); Width: 10 cm (3 7/8 in); Depth: 9 cm (3 ½ in). LP is the signature of Paris-based clockmaker Louis-Auguste Pointeaux (1809-1885). He invented a coup perdu escapement that was used on mantel clocks with half-seconds beating pendulums, and some very sophisticated travelling clocks with up to 12 winding holes (!). He exhibited in London in 1852. He created the large longcase clock, presently at rue de Rivoli in Paris, for the firm C. Detouche. He was established at Rue Chérubini from 1850 to 1880. coup perdu, Tardy, Dictionnaire des horlogers français, (Paris, 1972); Derek Roberts, Carriage and Other Travelling Clocks, (Shiffer, Atglen, 1993). € 6500.-Read more

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5 800 GBP

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Jacques Nève
Rue des Fonds 2
1440 Braine-le-Château
+32 477 27 19 08
jneve@horloger.net
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