Jacques Nève

Jacques Nève is an clockmaker and has been a member of the CNES (Chambre Nationale des Experts Spécialisés en objets d’art et de collection) since 2009. His workshop is located in Braine-le-Château, Belgium.

Jacques Nève offers a selection of clocks dating from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, carefully selected in terms of quality, originality and historical provenance.

The expert horlogist Jacques Nève also provides confidential appraisals for estate settlements, division of family property, insurance coverage and sales purposes. Certificates of authenticity can be provided on request.

Countries
  • Belgium
Objects "Jacques Nève"

Vrard SHANGHAI

L.VRARD & Co, SHANGHAI, carriage clock with engraved and gilt Gorge case, with center-sweeping seconds hand, second half of the 19th Century. The silvered platform with English-type crabtooth escapement and cut bi-metallic balance wheel. Half-hourly rack strike on a silvered bell at the rear, with repeat button on top at the front of the case. Alarum on a bell situated below. Autonomy 8 days. Enamel dial with Roman numerals for the hours, with signature L.Vrard & Co, Shanghai. Breguet blued steel hands with a large center-sweeping seconds hand. Breguet, Finely engraved and gilt Gorge case with bevelled glass on five sides allowing for a good view of the movement from all sides, the retailer’s name in Chinese is indicated on the rear movement plate. Gorge, Carriage clocks with center-sweeping seconds hands are rare as this feature added complexity to their design. The Chinese market of the 19th Century was eager for them as this made the clock alive, as time was thus visible with the naked eye. Another unusual feature on this clock is the presence of TWO separate bells, for the strike and alarum, an unexpected refinement. alive, . Height 19cm (7 ½”) with handle up, Width 9,5cm (3 ¾”), Depth 8,5cm (3 ¼”), Charles Allix and Peter Bonnert, Carriage Clocks, their History and development, The Antique’s Collector’s Club, 1974. Carriage Clocks, their History and development, € 6500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
5 800 GBP

Robert-Houdin Triple Mystery Clock

Jean Eugène ROBERT-HOUDIN, “Triple Mystery” Clock, Paris, circa 1850. Crystal, patinated and gilded bronze. Signed on the dial: Robert-Houdin/Paris. The circular dial, made from three clear glass plates of near-identical size, indicates the hours in Roman numerals and the minutes with precision indicators, with two arrow-shaped gilt-brass hands. The hours and signature are painted on the back of the first glass plate; the second glass plate contains the motion work in its center and moves with the hour hand, the third glass plate is the rear support of the assembly. The whole dial is contained by a gilt-brass surround that sits in a chased gilt-bronze mount supported by a crystal column terminating in three patinated-bronze griffins on a shallow ebony-simulated terrace decorated to end in gilt-bronze scrolls and grotesque motifs. Like the dial with multiple glass plates, the crystal column is actually made of two separate crystal tubes, the inner one being fitted with rotating wheels at both ends. A long rod with an endless screw is the link between the glass inner column and the removing middle dial, it is hidden within one of the decorative dial supports. Another such long rod with lantern pinions on both sides is hidden within one of the three griffins, and acts as the link between the movement and the crystal column. The movement, unable to be contained inside the base, is concealed within the circular black-lacquered pedestal bordered with fine brass fillets, the top covered in crimson velvet. It is made of two separate trains (one for the strike and the other for the time) with all wheels placed in a linear fashion so as two place them all in a narrow space. The movement ends with a platform escapement in a line, with Swiss-type escape wheel, and cut bi-metallic balance wheel. The strike is every hour and half hour on a coiled gong attached in the base and controlled by a countwheel. The movement is stamped E. Robert-Houdin and numbered 3857 on the winding side. The same very long brass key is used for winding and setting the hands through 3 holes at the rear of the base. Height 57 cm (22 ½ "), Diameter of dial: 12 cm (4 ½ "), Diameter of base: 26 cm (10 ¼ "). (Blois, 1805 – Saint-Gervais, 1871) Horologist, illusionist, stage artist. ‘I am inclined to believe’, noting in his biography “Confidences”, that I came into the world with a file, a compass or a hammer in my hand, for from my earliest youth, these instruments were my rattles, my toys; I seemed to use them as other children learned to walk and talk.’, All his life, Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin was ruled by his passion, or mania, to invent and perfect, never ceasing to surprise and fascinate; his scientific and technical innovations as well as his remarkable talent as a magician secured his place in history. The son of horologist Prosper Robert, Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin was born in Blois on 7 December 1805. Established as an horologist in Paris around 1835, Jean Eugène began his training in his father’s workshop. Although Prosper Robert insisted that his son pursue a legal career, Jean Eugène preferred the domain of horology and began an apprenticeship under his cousin Jean Martin Robert, reputed to be the most skilful horologist in town. Blois, home to the kings of France since the Renaissance, was one of the major horological centres at the time – in 1700, there were no fewer than 200 clockmakers working there. It was also here, in his hometown, that Jean Eugène Robert met his future wife, Josépha Eglantine Houdin, daughter of the well-established Blois horologist, Jacques Houdin, a monumental clockmaker who was summoned to Paris in 1820 to work for Bréguet. In late 1829, Jean Eugène Robert began working for his future father-in-law as a clock dealer, and on 8 July 1830 married his daughter whose surname became inseparable from his own, hyphenating it from then on as Robert-Houdin; it was officially recognised by Prince-President Louis-Philippe in 1852. Shortly after his marriage, Robert-Houdin established himself in Paris where he became known for the construction of ingenious automata and machines of his own invention. He first settled at 63, rue du Temple, repairing clocks and watches. Nevertheless he continued to invent, creating a cabinet of curiosities where he would produce a series of completely new mechanical devices that were marvels of ingenuity. He was awarded numerous prizes and medals throughout his lifetime, including first-class bronze, silver and gold medals at the 1839, 1844, 1855 and 1859 French Industry and Universal Exhibitions. Among his first inventions was the alarm-lighter clock for which he filed a five-year patent on 20 September 1837 for ‘an alarm clock whose function was to have light upon waking.’ It was activated by a watch movement with verge escapement, which released a small candle at the chosen hour — the tip of which, filled with a substance similar to that of German matches, was lit through friction. The success was such that it proved to be a financial boon to Robert-Houdin for many years to come. This commercial success allowed him to move to 13 rue Vendôme, hire employees and devote himself to the construction of automata, among which were ‘The Player with the Beaker’, ‘The Dancer on a Cord’, ‘The Singing Birds’ and the creation of his first masterpiece of horology: the mystery clock. The latter, as we have seen, was the horological expression of his talent as illusionist and became an object of curiosity, highly sought after by amateurs and collectors alike. After this fruitful period, Robert Houdin devoted even more time to creating automata. At the Universal Exhibition of 1844, he exhibited on a circular platform his timepieces and other mechanical devices such as the ‘Writer-Drawer’, which King Louis-Philippe himself admired, and was finally sold for $4000 to the famous American showman, P. T. Barnum. Once again, the Central Jury confirmed his success, awarding him a silver medal for all his inventions. He continued to invent, the list of which includes innovative devices like the electric distributer, electric regulator clock, a mechanism to detect leaks on ships, an electric plastron for fencers, a speedometer for automobiles…. without forgetting his famous “magic clock” invented in 1845, a true masterpiece, which he demonstrated as a stage act. Like the mystery clock, the magic clock’s hands moved without any apparent connection with the driving mechanism; two separate cords suspended the glass dial and bell, which, with a wave of Robert-Houdin’s magic wand, would obey the various orders and commands stunned spectators might suggest . In addition to his talent as inventor, Robert-Houdin had a charismatic personality that enabled him to perform on stage and captivate his audience easily. Theatre lover, illusionist and actor at heart, he opened his own conjuring theatre at 14 Galerie de Valois at the Palais Royal in Paris. On 3 July 1845, Robert-Houdin premiered the first of his four “Soirées Fantastiques” where he paraded a host of mechanical marvels that would respond to his voice, obeying the commands that spectators would suggest. For numerous years he triumphed before his public, earning a reputation worldwide. His fame was such that in 1848 he travelled to London to perform at the St. James’s Theatre, and also before Queen Victoria, who extended a personal invitation to have the magician perform at Buckingham Palace! In 1855, Robert-Houdin and the Maison Destouche exhibited together at the Universal Exhibition, where they were awarded a First Class Medal for seven inventions: an electric regulator clock, a mantel clock, several large bell-tower dials, a mechanism to turn electric current on during the day and off at night, a new electric SMEE battery, an electric distributer (precursor of the electro-magnetic motor) and a new device to transfer electric current. To this endless list, we can add that Robert-Houdin was one of the pioneers of the electric clock, for which he filed a patent in 1855. Tardy, Dictionnaire des Horlogers Français, Paris 1971; Polichinelle, Jan-Oct 1983, pp. 40-48; Francis Maitzner, Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin, Horloger, mécanicien, prestidigitateur “L’histoire de sa vie,” Bulletin ANCAHA, no. 58, été 1990, pp. 5-17; Richard Chavigny, Jean Robert-Houdin Horloger, Bulletin ANCAHA, no. 58, été 1990, pp. 19-28; J.C. Gendrot La pendule mystérieuse de Robert-Houdin Bulletin ANCAHA N° 58, été 1990, pp. 29-37; Paul Réal, Restauration d’une pendule à trois mystères signée E. Robert-Houdin, Bulletin ANCAHA, printemps 1998, pp. 39-44; Derek Roberts, Mystery, Novelty & Fantasy Clocks, Shiffer Publishing, USA, 1998. Dictionnaire des Horlogers Français, Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin, Horloger, mécanicien, prestidigitateur “L’histoire de sa vie,”, , Jean Robert-Houdin Horloger, La pendule mystérieuse de Robert-Houdin, Restauration d’une pendule à trois mystères, signée E. Robert-Houdin, Mystery, Novelty & Fantasy Clocks, Musée de la Magie, Blois; Musée Paul Dupuy, Toulouse, On requestRead more

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Baulion à Namur

Baulion à Namur, a portable table clock from the Louis XV period, circa 1760. Movement with square plates and two winders. Verge escapement, very short pendulum. Half-hourly rack strike on a silvered bell placed on top of the case. A pull-winder on the left for the strike repeat action. Enamel dial with Arabic numerals for the hours and the five minutes. Finely cut and engraved gilt hands, with a brass disk in the center for an optional alarum. The gilt brass dial surround with the typical signature of its maker Baulion A Namur. The brass case with four long legs below and four toupees on top, the fifth toupee on top of the bell. The rear painted iron door allows easy access to the pendulum, the two side doors with glass allow for a view of the movement. All doors are spring-loaded, another typical Baulion feature. Height 23cm (9"), Width 15cm (6 "), Depth 8cm (3"), a clockmaker born in Charleroi was made burgess of Namur on April 24th, 1761; active in 1760-1765, he was definitely Namur’s most renowned clockmaker. His clocks can be found in the two main musea: the “Musée de Groesbeek-de-Croix”, and the “Société Archéologique”. Several very similar clocks to ours are described in the “Catalogue Descriptif des Effets de Charles de Lorraine après sa mort en 1781 ». Charles of Lorraine (1712-1780) was the Governor-General of the Austrian Lower Countries and the Empress Maria-Theresa’s brother-in-law. His interest in timekeeping was notorious, and his collection contained no less that 175 watches and clocks. He often mentioned his collection and took numerous notes about it in his personal handbooks or on loose pieces of cardboard. This is how we know today of three different “clocks with alarum signed Bau-Lion à Namur. th, Catalogue Descriptif des Effets de Charles de Lorraine après sa mort en 1781 », Bau-Lion à Namur. Catalog Collection Charles de Lorraine, 1781 ; La Mesure du Temps, catalog of the exhibition in Namur, 7th to 22nd July 1962 ; Tardy La Pendule Française, La Pendule dans le Monde, 1987; Eddy Fraiture, Belgische Uurwerken en hun Makers, Horloges et Horlogers Belges A-Z, 2009. Collection Charles de Lorraine, La Mesure du Temps, La Pendule Française, La Pendule dans le Monde, Belgische Uurwerken en hun Makers, Horloges et Horlogers Belges A-Z, Namur, Société Archéologique, Clock Museum, € 6900.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
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Fixed price
6 100 GBP

George Prior

Wall-mounted Bracket Clock with lock, for the Ottoman market, circa 1790. Movement with two fusees and gutline transmission, anchor recoil escapement, spring suspended pendulum with adjustment under the bob. Hourly rack strike on a bronze bell above. Finely engraved rear plate bearing the signature or George Prior, London. Autonomy 8 days. Similarly signed enamel dial with Ottoman numerals for the five-minute markers and the hours. Strike suppressor lever (STRIKE – SILENT) above the numeral 60. Finely cut and gilt brass hands. Oak case with ebonized peartree veneer with varnished or gilt applied bronze lining and accessories. Side panels finely cut in the Oriental fashion, with silk back lining, allowing for the sound to go through while keeping the dust outside. Stylized lying crescent above the dial to underline the Easterly character. A very ingenious and unusual assembly system makes the whole assembly theft-proof; the clock is assembled with its bracket through two hand-screws hidden inside the bracket. The bracket cover also locks in place with a key, and the whole does not allow access to the wall screws, unless separated first. It is also to be noted that the two upper side panels can be easily removed for a technical access. Overall Height 72 cm (28 ¼”), W. 32 cm (12 ½”), D. 20 cm (8”), George Prior is recorded as active in Prescott St, London between 1765 and 1810. He was rewarded with the Silver Medal assorted with 25 guineas by the Arts Society for the invention of a new clock escapement, and rewarded again with 20 guineas for making a remontoire, which he patented in 1818. He was mostly known for supplying watches and clocks to the Ottoman market. Richard Barder, The Georgian Bracket Clock 1714-1830, 1993; G.H. Baillie, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, 1925; F.J.Britten, Old Clocks and Watches & Their Makers, 1904. € 13500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
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Fixed price
12 000 GBP

Exceptional carved walnut wall clock – Rossigneux

Exceptional carved walnut wall clock by Charles-François Rossigneux, Paris, circa 1870. The clock dial in waxed and polished walnut, with gothic-style Roman hour chapters painted in white, chased gilt-brass hands; the case, in the form of a heraldic crest resting on a small gadrooned base finished with an acanthus leaf motif; the whole entirely decorated with Neo-Renaissance motifs loosely inspired from Antiquity, flanked on either side by two inverted winged-dragons with reptile-like tails coiled around a chimera mascaron placed in the centre; above, branches of laurel leaves and a horn-shaped vase filled with a pomegranate bouquet surmount the clock. Self-starting movement with horizontal balance wheel, autonomy eight days. Impressive in scale, this clock case is a real tour de force of wood carving, superimposing a proliferation of ornaments that blends naturalistic plant forms with an imaginary universe composed of hybrid creatures and a grotesque mascaron. Graceful yet spirited, with outlandish and powerful accents, its design recalls the decorative vocabulary of the architect and designer Charles-François Rossigneux. This becomes evident when comparing its lines and motifs to a certain number of his original drawings housed at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, in which we see the same motifs: some imaginary, like the open-mouthed dragons, terrifying chimera mascarons and the form of the central crest with emerging serpent-tails; some taken from plant forms, like the clusters of fruit sprays; others inspired from ornamental book illustrations, with compartments and arabesques, for which Rossigneux was well-known. It is precisely in Rossigneux’s hand-drawn illustrations, depicting vignettes, foliage scrolls, tailpieces and ornamental lettering destined for fine-edition publications, that we discovered the source of inspiration for the present clock, notably in the magnificent folio of the Gospels (Les Saints Evangiles) published by Hachette in 1873 (fig.1-2-3): printed in two volumes, the set contains 128 large etchings after original drawings by Alexandre Bida, and 290 steel engravings featuring decorative titles, chapter heads, tailpieces and initials by L. Gaucherel after drawings by Ch. Rossigneux. H 147 cm (58"), W 102 cm (40"), D 26 cm (10"), (Paris, 1818 – 1907). A prolific artist, Rossigneux also designed fine-edition bindings and contributed, from 1860 to 1875, to the major decorating and furnishing projects in Paris. His practice was to supply a highly finished drawing to a sculptor, who, under his direction and close supervision, created a full-scale relief model that would then be reproduced in wood or precious metal. Rossigneux began his career working for the Gruel bookbinding firm, where he was in charge of designing bindings, endeavouring to introduce new elements inspired from nature. His early designs, noted at the 1844 Exposition des produits de l’industrie (French Industrial Exhibition) in Paris, enabled him to go to Cairo, chosen to decorate the apartments of the ‘Abbas’s palace, which the viceroy of Egypt ‘Abbas Pasha had just finished building. He spent three years in the Orient, from 1848-1851, and became friends with the painters Alexandre Bida and Maxime du Camp. While on mission in Egypt, he was able to develop relationships with the most prominent furniture and decorative-arts firms in France, which, upon his return, kept him occupied with important construction and decorating projects. In 1855, Rossigneux was appointed architect and assistant curator at the Exposition universelle (World Fair) in Paris. In the same year he established a privileged working relationship with Christofle, winning a silver medal for a silver cup made after his designs, and undertaking a project for a centrepiece with three winged infants for the Empress’ personal dining table. As of 1860, he worked under the direction of the architect Alfred Normand for several years, decorating Prince Napoleon’s Pompeii-style home, notably designing lamps and large candelabra, as well as bronze work for the Atrium doors. While he was creating designs for silver, Rossigneux was asked, in 1862, to take over as creative director of MM. Hache et Pepin-Lehalleur, the porcelain manufacture located in Vierzon – a collaboration that lasted until 1870. His influence was no less important at the Manufacture des Gobelins, where for over twenty years he acted as member of the Commission de perfectionnement (Committee for advancement). In 1868, the critic Edmond About described him in these terms: ‘M. Charles Rossigneux, an architect of all stripes, constructs homes, decorates apartments, designs furniture, sketches stained-glass windows, and has tableware, crystal, silverware and even Madame’s jewellery, made after his designs […].’ The following pieces date from the most active period of his career, lasting from 1860 to 1875: a Pompeii-style centrepiece for Prince Napoleon (now lost), a Neo-Grec tea service (exhibited in 1867), an ebony jewellery cabinet with inlay and enamel work (1873), a complete silverware service with the Nemean Lion hide as its principal ornamental motif (exhibited in 1875), a salon table with a gold and silver-inlaid top for Mme de Païva’s hôtel particulier on the Champs-Elysées, bronze work for M. Fouret’s private mansion, and marble vases with bronze mounts and Louis XIV chandeliers for M. Armand Templier. While working simultaneously on these numerous pieces, Rossigneux also designed fine jewellery for the goldsmiths Froment-Meurice; designed furniture for Count Henkel von Donnersmark’s castle in the province of Silesia (1887); and lastly, decorated the entire Hachette family’s hôtel particulier, where everything including chandeliers, torchères and bronze mounts were executed after his designs. The striking similarities between the present clock and the designs for the initials and tailpieces for the 1873 edition of Les Evangiles, leads us to believe that the present clock, exceptional in every respect, could have originated from the prestigious Hachette decorative ensemble now lost. Rossigneux, like Feuchère, Vechte and Klagmann, belonged to the same prestigious school, one that has earned a unique place in the decorative arts of the nineteenth century. During an exhibition of Rossigneux’s work at the Pavillon de Marsan (formerly part of the Tuileries Palace), F. de Ribes-Christofle liked to highlight the effects of his style, of which ‘the characteristic lies in the harmony of his compositional variety, the coherence of his design, and, above all, in the distinctive elegance that acts like a hallmark.’ A multi-talented artist, Rossigneux can be counted, along with Constant-Sevin and the furniture designer Fourdinois, as one of the most prominent representatives of the French decorative arts. Countless designs left his workshop to guide the hands of sculptors and goldsmiths who brought to life splendid bindings, tapestries, jewellery, delicate ceramic work, and furniture made for the sole purpose of obtaining prestigious prizes at the World’s Fairs. Bulletin Bibliographique, Gazette des Beaux Arts, 1873, 2e période, p. 564; Léon Deshairs, Charles Rossigneux, architecte décorateur (1818-1907), Gazette des Beaux-Arts, 1908; Jules Guiffrey, Charles-François Rossigneux, architecte et dessinateur (1818-1907), s.n. 1908; M. de Ribes-Christofle, Notice nécrologique sur M. Ch. Rossigneux, Société d’encouragement pour l’industrie nationale, Paris, Extrait du Bulletin de Mars 1908. Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, On requestRead more

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Precision table regulator, masterpiece from Francis Breyne

Brussels Professional School of Precision Mechanics And Electricity, precision table regulator, masterpiece from Francis Breyne in 1931. Extremely robust construction movement with thick plates and four large turned pillars screwed on both sides, Graham escapement, steel suspension powered by a mainspring in a barrel allowing for a three-week autonomy. Pine wood rod pendulum with micrometric crutch adjustment, graduated adjustment on the heavy brass bob.The plates nicely machined patterned. Large silvered dial with Roman numerals for the hours, bearing the signature ECOLE PROFELLE DE MÉCANIQUE DE PRÉCISION ET D'ELECTRICITÉ DE BRUXELLES, FRANCIS BREYNE 1931. Two blued steel hands, with polished conical washer at the center. It was traditionally left to the student cabinet-makers of that same prestigious school to make the case, using the best materials and assembly methods of the time. It is made in a very fine manner, using quarter-sawn oak and glasses on four sides, to emphasize the geometrical shapes and to show the movement in its best possible view. Its trapeze shape with stepped decorations and slightly triangular hood, is directly inspired from the clocks cases made by Gustave Serrurier-Bovy (1858-1910), the famous Liège architect and decorator who was a major player in interior designs in Belgium. The detailed plans of most parts for these masterpieces still exist and are reproduced in the PDF files with links below. Height 52 cm, Width 35 cm, Depth 16 cm. that was to become later the Arts and Crafts School of Brussels, held the reputation of being one of the finest clock-making school in the World in the 20th Century years preceding the Second World War. As an end of school project, the students had to entirely manufacture a precision regulator of a given design. They were left with some liberties for some of the execution details, and these finished works were to become their masterpiece, that were to stay with them for the rest of their career, so as to demonstrate their skill, but also to regulate all the other time instruments that they would work on. € 5400.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
4 800 GBP

Sam Brown, Edinburgh

SAM BROWN Edinburgh, Scottish floor standing regulator of small size, circa 1780, circular silvered brass dial with Arabic numerals for the five minutes and Roman numerals for the hours, an inner circle marking the days of the month also with Arabic numerals. Blued steel hands for the hours and minutes, polished brass hand ending with a moon for the day indications. Subsidiary dial above the center with sweeping seconds hand. Horizontal signature Sam Brown Edin.r. Weight driven movement with tapering plates cast with 'feet' united by three turned pillars, with deadbeat escapement overlapping the top pillar, the pendulum suspended from a steel arm traversing the top of the plates. Case with broken arched pediment and carved dentil cornice centered by a brass finial on freestanding reeded Doric columns, the trunk with chamfered front angles and terminating in shaped and carved protrusions to accept the swing of the pendulum bob, on a tall base of particularly good colour and figure, on bracket feet, solid Cuban mahogany and mahogany veneer on oak, lock and key for the lower door, a secret locks the upper door. Sam Brown Edin.r, H. 6’ 1” 1/4 (186 cm), L. 18” 1/8 (46 cm), P. 14” 3/16 (36 cm), Edinburgh, member of the Clockmaker’s Company, 1750-1787 ; son of John Brown (1720-1750) ; associated with George Skelton, 1787. In 1756, Samuel Brown delivered to the subscribers of the Caledonian Mercury a popular treatise on Astronomy by James Ferguson. He was admitted to the Incorporation of Hammermen in 1757. This Incorporation, whose origins are as old as Scotland’s, was very active from the 16th Century, especially in Dundee where gold-, silver- and gunsmiths were established in great numbers. More than thirty crafts figure in the Hammerman records such as Armourer, Bucklemaker, Blacksmith, Gunsmith, Goldsmith, Silversmith, Jeweller, Clocksmith, Watchmaker, Knocksmith, Cutler, Sword Slipper, Locksmith, Farrier, Saddler, Lorimer, Brassfounder, Plumber, Pewterer, Guardmaker and Potter. All were “metalsmiths” and practiced the art of metal hammering. This Incorporation played a very active role in the Regional and National economic development until the middle of the 19th Century and the advent of the industrial era. The rules of membership of this Incorporation were very strict, but in return its members benefited from an excellent reputation and a good level of social security. As reported in the Edinburgh Hammermen Records, Samuel Brown "compared and presented his essay, being a watch movement made and finished in his own shop, as William Nicol, landlord, Deacon Dalgleish, William Auld, and James Cowan, essay masters declared, which essay was found to be a well wrought essay, etc, and he was therefore admitted a freeman clock and watch maker in the Incorporation.", Caledonian Mercury, 25th September 1756 ; Edinburgh Hammermen Records, 1757 ; G.H. Baillie, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, Methuen & Co London, 1929. € 15000.-Read more

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13 300 GBP

Platnauer Bristol with single strike

Joseph Platnauer, Bristol, large size mahogany wall timepiece for stations or administrations, circa 1840. Painted convex dial with signature, Roman numerals for the hours and graduations for the minutes, every five marked by a triangle, blued steel hands, cast convex bezel and moulded mahogany outer with a high curve domed glass. Single gut fusee movement with rectangular plates with cut upper corners united by four knopped pillars, recoil anchor escapement. Single strike on the hour on a large bronze bell. Autonomy 8 days. Dimensions External diameter 18” (48 cm), dial diameter 15” (38cm), overall depth 7 1/2 ” (19cm) Bibliography Brian Loomes, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, NAG Press, 1984. Price € 6500.-, Joseph Platnauer, Bristol, large size mahogany wall timepiece for stations or administrations, circa 1840. Painted convex dial with signature, Roman numerals for the hours and graduations for the minutes, every five marked by a triangle, blued steel hands, cast convex bezel and moulded mahogany outer with a high curve domed glass. Single gut fusee movement with rectangular plates with cut upper corners united by four knopped pillars, recoil anchor escapement. Single strike on the hour on a large bronze bell. Autonomy 8 days. Dimensions, External diameter 18” (48 cm), dial diameter 15” (38cm), overall depth 7 1/2 ” (19cm), Bibliography, Brian Loomes, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, NAG Press, 1984. Price, € 6500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
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5 800 GBP

François Frewin

Precision Table Regulator, Masterpiece from François Frewin In 1924, Brussels Professional School Of Precision Mechanics And Electricity. Extremely robust construction movement with thick plates and four large turned pillars screwed on both sides, Graham escapement placed on the lower end of the movement, and thus upside-down, steel suspension, and powered by a mainspring in a barrel allowing for a two-week autonomy. Exceptional three-rod compensated pendulum of an original design inspired by Ellicott, with micrometric crutch adjustment, graduated adjustment on the heavy lead-filled ormolu bob. The plates nicely marble patterned. Large silvered dial with Roman numerals for the hours, bearing the signature ECOLE PROFELLEDE MÉCANIQUE DE PRÉCISION ET D'ELECTRICITÉ DE BRUXELLES, FRANCOIS FREWIN 1924. Two blued steel hands, with polished conical washer at the center. ELLE, Oak case with geometrical inlays of various exotic woods. Height 25ˮ (64cm), Width 14ˮ (36cm), Depth ½ˮ (22cm), that was to become later the Arts and Crafts School of Brussels, held the reputation of being one of the finest clock-making school in the World in the 20th Century years preceding the Second World War. As an end of school project, the students had to entirely manufacture a precision regulator of a given design. They were left with some liberties for some of the execution details, and these finished works were to become their masterpiece, that were to stay with them for the rest of their career, so as to demonstrate their skill, but also to regulate all the other time instruments that they would work on. Arts and Crafts School of Brussels, It was traditionally left to the student cabinet-makers of that same prestigious school to make the case, using the best materials and assembly methods of the time. It is made in a very fine manner, using quarter-sawn oak and glasses on four sides, to emphasize the geometrical shapes and to show the movement in its best possible view. This particular case being the only one known to us, along with the presence of this exceptional pendulum make it very likely that the student François Frewin made his own case as well. € 11.000Read more

  • BELBelgium
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Fixed price
9 800 GBP

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Jacques Nève
Rue des Fonds 2
1440 Braine-le-Château
+32 477 27 19 08
jneve@horloger.net