Jacques Nève

Jacques Nève is an clockmaker and has been a member of the CNES (Chambre Nationale des Experts Spécialisés en objets d’art et de collection) since 2009. His workshop is located in Braine-le-Château, Belgium.

Jacques Nève offers a selection of clocks dating from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, carefully selected in terms of quality, originality and historical provenance.

The expert horlogist Jacques Nève also provides confidential appraisals for estate settlements, division of family property, insurance coverage and sales purposes. Certificates of authenticity can be provided on request.

Countries
  • Belgium
Objects "Jacques Nève"

Dieudonné Lhoest

Empire-period (circa 1810) floor-standing regulator of long duration signed D.D. Lhoest à Liege. Cuban mahogany veneer on oak and single pine rear panel for the case, ormolu decorations applied, with a face of Appollo on the base. Rear-painted glass dial of large dimension in the Liège fashion, blued steel hour, minute and seconds hands, turned wood and stucco with gold leaf bezel. Six-month duration movement, completely enclosed within sliding brass plates against dust; maintaining power, 9.2kgs weight suspended with a pulley and a gutline, knife-edge suspension in front of the movement, heavy gridiron pendulum with brass and steel rods arranged in the Harrison manner for temperature compensation, with indication on a small glass dial in mid-height. Height 220cm, width 61cm, depth 35cm. Dieudonné Lhoest was born in Liège on 18 September 1778, the second son of the clockmaker Nicolas Lhoest and Catherine Polain. He married Marguerite Devigne and was established 1n 1806 in the Rue Saint-Jean-Baptiste, 740, in Liège. He was a pupil and helper of his uncle Hubert Sarton, and became master clockmaker himself. Other examples of his production include a three-dial clock, and a month-winding four-dial regulator. Our regulator bears many hallmarks of Hubert Sarton's workshop, amongst others: the anti-dust plates, the glass dial, the crossing out and dentures of the wheels, and the threads of the big bolts holding the supporting bracket in the case. There is also to be noted that there is another very similar regulator in existence, with almost identical dial, pendulum, movement, and bearing the signature of Dieudonné Lhoest's first cousin and contemporary J. Sarton Fils à Tilleur. (Private collection). Hubert Sarton, Horlogerie Ancienne, Bibliographie des principaux artistes horlogers-mécaniciens liégeois n°28, Florent Pholien; Horloges et Horlogers Belges, Eddy Fraiture 2009; L'Age d'Or de l'Horlogerie Liégeoise, Ann Chevalier et André Thiry 2003; Les pendules d'Hubert Sarton, 1748-1828, Horloger-Mécanicien, Inventeur, mémoire présenté en 2009 à la Chambre Nationale des Experts Spécialisés en Meubles, Estampes, Livres, Objets d'Art et de Collection, Paris, Jacques Nève 2009. On requestRead more

  • BELBelgium
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Vestal Virgins

“Vestal Virgins”, a Directoire period Mantel Clock, circa 1795. In chased and gilded bronze, the serpent to the underside of the athenienne in patinated bronze, the two columns in red Griotte marble. Signed on the dial A PARIS (indication that the clockmaker ordered the clock from a bronzier or marchand mercier, permitting him to add his name to the enamel dial). The name on the dial however has long since disappeared, erased from years of handling. A PARIS, bronzier, marchand mercier, Paris-style movement with anchor recoil escapement and silk suspended sunburst pendulum. Countwheel strike for the hours and half hours on a silvered bell. Autonomy 15 days. Very fine polychrome dial, with “slanted” Arabic numerals for the hours and 15-minute intervals; delicate blue wildflowers marking each half five-minute interval and underlined with a gilt filet; red Arabic numerals for the 30-day Revolutionary calendar. Chased, gilt-brass hour and minute hands; blued steel calendar hand. Draped in classical attire, both vestal virgins hold a laurel crown and trumpet, symbols of victory and glory, while hoisting a tassel-trimmed drape over an athenienne containing the sacrificial flame, the whole in gilded and patinated bronze. Set within the folds of the drape, the dial is surmounted by a triumphant cherub astride a spread-winged eagle perched on an Ionic capital. The gilt-bronze base, on ten toupee feet, is cast with a frieze depicting in its centre two swans drinking from a fountain and flanked on either side by two lions resting their front paw on a sphere. Vestal virgins were young priestesses devoted to the cult of Vesta, goddess of the hearth and their task was to maintain the sacrificial flame. The use of these figures for decorative purposes is indicative of the late eighteenth century’s more severe perspective of Antiquity, which continued under the French Directory; symbols like the sacrificial fire became associated with virtue, while the vestals became symbolic of patriotism. The origin of the vestal-themed clock model dates back to the reign of Louis XVI and derives from a Hubert Robert engraving, published in Recueil des griffonis (1771-1773) by the abbot de Saint ­Non, depicting an ancient fragment, which was much admired in Rome. It was then reinterpreted and applied by the most celebrated ornament designers and bronziers of the time, like Jean-Démosthène Dugourc and Pierre-Philippe Thomire, to create exceptional mantel clocks like the one presented here. Recueil des griffonis, bronziers, H. 66 cm (26") W. 50 cm (19 1/2") D. 13 cm (5")Read more

  • BELBelgium
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Platnauer Bristol with single strike

Joseph Platnauer, Bristol, large size mahogany wall timepiece for stations or administrations, circa 1840. Painted convex dial with signature, Roman numerals for the hours and graduations for the minutes, every five marked by a triangle, blued steel hands, cast convex bezel and moulded mahogany outer with a high curve domed glass. Single gut fusee movement with rectangular plates with cut upper corners united by four knopped pillars, recoil anchor escapement. Single strike on the hour on a large bronze bell. Autonomy 8 days. Dimensions External diameter 18” (48 cm), dial diameter 15” (38cm), overall depth 7 1/2 ” (19cm) Bibliography Brian Loomes, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, NAG Press, 1984. Price € 6500.-, Joseph Platnauer, Bristol, large size mahogany wall timepiece for stations or administrations, circa 1840. Painted convex dial with signature, Roman numerals for the hours and graduations for the minutes, every five marked by a triangle, blued steel hands, cast convex bezel and moulded mahogany outer with a high curve domed glass. Single gut fusee movement with rectangular plates with cut upper corners united by four knopped pillars, recoil anchor escapement. Single strike on the hour on a large bronze bell. Autonomy 8 days. Dimensions, External diameter 18” (48 cm), dial diameter 15” (38cm), overall depth 7 1/2 ” (19cm), Bibliography, Brian Loomes, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, NAG Press, 1984. Price, € 6500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
5 500 GBP

Offering to Cupid

A Monumental Napoleon III Mantel Clock, “Offering to Cupid” after Louis-Simon Boizot, circa 1865. Chased and gilded bronze, Sèvres biscuit porcelain figure group, grey (bleu turquin) and white Carrara marble, signed on the dial: E. Hoydebine à Paris. bleu turquin, E. Hoydebine à Paris. Paris-style, Paris-style movement, after an ébauche by Vincenti et Cie, with a Swiss-style platform escapement and a coutwheel strike for the hours and half hours, on a silvered bell. Autonomy 8 days. Very fine white, black, navy blue and gold polychrome dial; Roman hour numerals with the addition of the twelve signs of the zodiac. Signed E. Hoydebine à Paris. Chased gilt-brass hour and minute hands. ébauche, E. Hoydebine à Paris. In the form of a semi-circular temple, this monumental clock features in its centre a Sèvres biscuit porcelain group depicting Cupid perched on an altar holding a torch, surrounded by two young women draped in classical attire. Another winged cherub sits behind the altar. Sèvres, The temple is composed of six Corinthian marble and gilt-bronze columns supporting a terrace embellished with a balustrade spaced evenly on either side of the central dial, the whole surmounted by a gilt-bronze cherub holding a torch in his right hand and a crown of flowers in his left. Two flaming urns supporting a flower garland decorate each corner. The gray marble plinth, on ten toupee feet, is cast with a frieze decorated with joyful winged cherubs straddling clouds and surmounted with a stepped white marble terrace, each step highlighted with a string of gilt-bronze pearls. This Napoleon III mantel clock embodies the Second Empire’s taste for the arts of the eighteenth century. Empress Eugenie’s passion for Marie-Antoinette and the Age of Enlightenment is well known, and her interest spurred the commission, among others, of the re-edition of numerous pieces of Sèvres biscuit porcelain that served to bring it back into fashion. The central group here – a re-edition of a model in biscuit porcelain made after Louis-Simon Boizot’s sculpture L’Offrande à l’Amour (Offering to Cupid) – reflects the fashion of a period that revived, in its boundless quest for luxury, all of antiquity’s refinement and grace. Originally, L’Offrande à l’Amour, along with its pendant, L’Offrande à l’Hymen, was part of a three-piece ornamental centrepiece in hard-paste biscuit porcelain created in 1776 at the Sèvres porcelain manufactory by Boizot, sculptor to the King and director of the sculpture studio at Sèvres (model by Josse-François-Joseph Le Riche) (Fig. 1 and 2). Louis XVI purchased the complete centrepiece in 1778. Especially admired were the groups’ sequence of lively attitudes, the quality of the modelling and attention to detail, as well as the accomplished contrast between the very elaborate drapery and the smoothness of the figures’ bodies. L’Offrande à l’Amour, L’Offrande à l’Amour, L’Offrande à l’Hymen, In the same spirit of historicism, the temple’s semi-circular colonnade recalls the splendour of Versailles and seems to be directly inspired from the Temple de l’Amour (Temple of Cupid), built by Richard Mique in 1777-78 – a view of which Marie-Antoinette may have contemplated from her bedchamber window at the Petit Trianon. This clock’s monumental proportions and eclectic style reflect perfectly what characterized so much of the decorative arts during the Second Empire; a style that paid homage to the eighteenth century in borrowing its forms and motifs from the arts and architecture of the reign of Louis XVI. Temple de l’Amour, H. 88 cm (34 1/2") W. 59 cm (23") D. 37 cm (14 1/2"), Hoydebine à ParisRead more

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Leroy

Scientific and observation chronometer, sold in 1913 , signed L. Leroy 7 Bd de la Madeleine à Paris, also signed No. 1210 Leroy & Cie on an ivory panel. The main movement is of a typical marine chronometer, with silvered dial and Roman numerals, with first subsidiary dial under the numeral XII indicating the 56-hour power reserve, and second subsidiary dial above VI for the seconds. Signature and serial number in the centre. Powered by a main barrel with fusee and spring-detent escapement, it being prolonged in a square to be used as a stop-start to the additional movement specially made for the transmission of an electrical impulse every second or half-second. An ingenious cam system allows for the transmission of either an impulse or an interruption of continuous current every second or half second at will. This second movement, especially designed for this instrument, also works with fusee and chain, cams and electrical switches, and has a power reserve of 7 hours. All these special options are switchable through the front panel, just underneath the main dial. The chronometer is encased in a rectangular mahogany box with two lids. The first, with a glass panel, provides access to the dials and functions; the second provides access to a bottom compartment containing the key and space to store documents. The lower panel allows for sliding sideways with two holes for winding both movements separately. On the side are placed the three holes for the electrical contactors. Black text on ivory panel reads: No. 1210 Leroy & Cie, Presented in its original padded and numbered mahogany storage box with external handle. In very good condition and perfect working order. Historical note:, Historical note: Sold by Leroy in 1913 to Thomas Mercer & Co (the pre-eminent manufacturer and retailer of marine chronometers in Great Britain) who retailed it to Mr. Ferrié. H. 10.7 cm (4.2 in); W. 17.1 cm (6.7 in); D. 23.5 cm (9.3 in) Box dimensions: H. 15.6 cm (6.1 in); W. 24.3 cm (9.6 in); D. 30.9 cm (12.2 in), This observation chronometer made by the firm L. Leroy is characteristic of the instruments produced for marine and military use. It is also a perfect example of what was considered to be the most accurate timepiece produced by French chronometer makers during the first half of the nineteenth century. The coveted title ‘Clockmaker to the Navy’ (Horloger de la Marine) successively awarded by the King and then by the State to the most pre-eminent clockmakers, gave Leroy the equivalent recognition of ‘supreme master’ (brevet de maîtrise suprême) in the art of precision timekeeping. Leaving an indelible mark in the history of chronometry, his achievement was consecrated after obtaining 349 medals from the Besançon Observatory – a record that still stands to this day. The Leroy company archives, comprising sales records of almost 400,000 timepieces, reveal the names of thousands of clients, often famous and powerful figures. A study of the documentation concerning the ‘Production nos./Chronometers and Astronomical Clocks’, reveals that our chronometer (no. 1210) was sold on 21 May 1913 to Thomas Mercer & Co, one of the most prolific makers of luxury chronometers, and undoubtedly the most reputed firm in its day. As indicated in the records, this purchase was intended for a certain ‘Monsieur Ferrié’, who it will be shown, was, as an inventor, closely tied to the development of the prestigious firm L. Leroy, established then in the heart of the Grands Boulevards of Haussmannian Paris. After his reputation was cemented at the 1900 Universal Exhibition in Paris, Leroy turned his attention to the development of scientific, military, industrial, and sports chronometry. This led to a collaboration in 1910 between L. Leroy, the aforementioned Gustave Ferrié and the Paris Observatory, to install the first radio time signal transmission station atop the Eiffel Tower, allowing the broadcast by telegraphic code of the national reference time over an area spanning 6000 km (3728 mi). A master clock known as a ‘constant-pressure regulator’ drove the transmission system. Accurate to 1/100 of a second, protected by heavy glass domes and lowered into wells twenty-five meters deep to avoid vibrations, these timekeeping instruments were the most precise and reliable built to date. In the 1920s, they became the basis for the reference time used by the majority of national observatories worldwide, from China to the United States, as well as Switzerland. As such, it is possible to suppose that Ferrié, just nominated president of the International Commission of Longitudes in 1912, used his Leroy chronometer to measure the precise time from the summit of the Eiffel Tower. By inventing the first regularly scheduled time service, which standardized time nationwide, this ingenious engineer, who later became general, also made it possible for ships to determine their position at sea, revolutionizing the way longitude was determined. It is also thanks to Ferrié that in 1904 the Eiffel Tower officially became a military radiotelegraph station, and served as of 1921 as an antenna mast for broadcasting radio programs. Furthermore, these countless benefits were able to spare the now-famous monument from certain demolition; the tower was built for the 1889 Universal Exhibition in commemoration of the centenary of the French Revolution and was scheduled for demolition in 1909, when its 20-year lease expired. GUSTAVE FERRIÉ (1868-1932), GUSTAVE FERRIÉ (1868-1932) When on 21 January 1904 the Eiffel Tower became an official wireless telegraph communications station, Gustave Ferrié was in charge of the exploration and implementation of wireless telegraph stations for military purposes, using the tower to mount antennas for long-range telegraphy. In 1914, Ferrié, then a colonel, was named director of the committee of French military radio communications (TSF), setting up a radiotelegraphy network during World War I. With the strategic role of the Eiffel Tower in Paris confirmed, another station was built in Lyon for safety reasons. Ferrié also further developed military communication research, equipped the French and Allied forces, and developed a colonial network thanks to this new communications technology. Promoted to Brigadier-General in 1919, Gustave Ferrié became General Inspector of military telegraphy and transmission services. In 1921 he received the Osiris Prize, the most prestigious prize medal awarded by the Institute de France, and in 1922 he was elected member of the Academy of Sciences. By the end of his life, he presided over thirty-two international scientific organisations. Every year, the Mayor of Paris awards the General Ferrié Prize to a researcher who has distinguished him or herself in the field of communications. Tony Mercer, Chronometer Makers of the World, NAG Press 1991; Michel Amoudry, Le Général Ferrié, Presse Universitaire de Grenoble, 1993; Maison Leroy, company brochure. € 14500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
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12 300 GBP

Manberger

Carriage Clock with Simulated-Bamboo Case signed Enrique Manberger Madrid, mid- to late 19th Century. The movement with maltese crosses on both winders and alarum, for better timekeeping, English-style crabtooth-escapement platform with cut bi-metallic balance wheel and gold adjusting screws. Hourly and half-hourly gong strike with repeat feature by a button on top of the case. Alarum striking the same gong. Eight-days autonomy. Hexagonal dials, with nickelled and gilded ‘bamboo’ borders, on a silvered and gilt-brass ground reminiscent of ivory. Porcelain dials with Arabic numerals, each within a finely crafted cartouche. Arbalète or ‘crossbow’ blued-steel hands indicating the hours, minutes and the alarm on the subsidiary dial. Signature Enrique Manberger MADRID (clockmaker/retailer); produced in France. The case, with bevelled glass on five sides allows view of entire movement, assembled with intersecting ‘bamboo poles’, gilded and nickelled for a nice contrast-enhancing effect. Original leather storage box; original double-ended winding key. Height with handle upright: 19.5 cm (7 ½ in); Width: 10 cm (3 7/8 in); Depth: 9 cm (3 ½ in). LP is the signature of Paris-based clockmaker Louis-Auguste Pointeaux (1809-1885). He invented a coup perdu escapement that was used on mantel clocks with half-seconds beating pendulums, and some very sophisticated travelling clocks with up to 12 winding holes (!). He exhibited in London in 1852. He created the large longcase clock, presently at rue de Rivoli in Paris, for the firm C. Detouche. He was established at Rue Chérubini from 1850 to 1880. coup perdu, Tardy, Dictionnaire des horlogers français, (Paris, 1972); Derek Roberts, Carriage and Other Travelling Clocks, (Shiffer, Atglen, 1993). € 6500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
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5 500 GBP

Sam Brown, Edinburgh

SAM BROWN Edinburgh, Scottish floor standing regulator of small size, circa 1780, circular silvered brass dial with Arabic numerals for the five minutes and Roman numerals for the hours, an inner circle marking the days of the month also with Arabic numerals. Blued steel hands for the hours and minutes, polished brass hand ending with a moon for the day indications. Subsidiary dial above the center with sweeping seconds hand. Horizontal signature Sam Brown Edin.r. Weight driven movement with tapering plates cast with 'feet' united by three turned pillars, with deadbeat escapement overlapping the top pillar, the pendulum suspended from a steel arm traversing the top of the plates. Case with broken arched pediment and carved dentil cornice centered by a brass finial on freestanding reeded Doric columns, the trunk with chamfered front angles and terminating in shaped and carved protrusions to accept the swing of the pendulum bob, on a tall base of particularly good colour and figure, on bracket feet, solid Cuban mahogany and mahogany veneer on oak, lock and key for the lower door, a secret locks the upper door. Sam Brown Edin.r, H. 6’ 1” 1/4 (186 cm), L. 18” 1/8 (46 cm), P. 14” 3/16 (36 cm), Edinburgh, member of the Clockmaker’s Company, 1750-1787 ; son of John Brown (1720-1750) ; associated with George Skelton, 1787. In 1756, Samuel Brown delivered to the subscribers of the Caledonian Mercury a popular treatise on Astronomy by James Ferguson. He was admitted to the Incorporation of Hammermen in 1757. This Incorporation, whose origins are as old as Scotland’s, was very active from the 16th Century, especially in Dundee where gold-, silver- and gunsmiths were established in great numbers. More than thirty crafts figure in the Hammerman records such as Armourer, Bucklemaker, Blacksmith, Gunsmith, Goldsmith, Silversmith, Jeweller, Clocksmith, Watchmaker, Knocksmith, Cutler, Sword Slipper, Locksmith, Farrier, Saddler, Lorimer, Brassfounder, Plumber, Pewterer, Guardmaker and Potter. All were “metalsmiths” and practiced the art of metal hammering. This Incorporation played a very active role in the Regional and National economic development until the middle of the 19th Century and the advent of the industrial era. The rules of membership of this Incorporation were very strict, but in return its members benefited from an excellent reputation and a good level of social security. As reported in the Edinburgh Hammermen Records, Samuel Brown "compared and presented his essay, being a watch movement made and finished in his own shop, as William Nicol, landlord, Deacon Dalgleish, William Auld, and James Cowan, essay masters declared, which essay was found to be a well wrought essay, etc, and he was therefore admitted a freeman clock and watch maker in the Incorporation.", Caledonian Mercury, 25th September 1756 ; Edinburgh Hammermen Records, 1757 ; G.H. Baillie, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, Methuen & Co London, 1929. € 15000.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
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Fixed price
12 700 GBP

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Jacques Nève
Rue des Fonds 2
1440 Braine-le-Château
+32 477 27 19 08
jneve@horloger.net
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