Jacques Nève

Jacques Nève is an clockmaker and has been a member of the CNES (Chambre Nationale des Experts Spécialisés en objets d’art et de collection) since 2009. His workshop is located in Braine-le-Château, Belgium.

Jacques Nève offers a selection of clocks dating from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, carefully selected in terms of quality, originality and historical provenance.

The expert horlogist Jacques Nève also provides confidential appraisals for estate settlements, division of family property, insurance coverage and sales purposes. Certificates of authenticity can be provided on request.

Countries
  • Belgium
Objects "Jacques Nève"

Platnauer Bristol with single strike

Joseph Platnauer, Bristol, large size mahogany wall timepiece for stations or administrations, circa 1840. Painted convex dial with signature, Roman numerals for the hours and graduations for the minutes, every five marked by a triangle, blued steel hands, cast convex bezel and moulded mahogany outer with a high curve domed glass. Single gut fusee movement with rectangular plates with cut upper corners united by four knopped pillars, recoil anchor escapement. Single strike on the hour on a large bronze bell. Autonomy 8 days. Dimensions External diameter 18” (48 cm), dial diameter 15” (38cm), overall depth 7 1/2 ” (19cm) Bibliography Brian Loomes, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, NAG Press, 1984. Price € 6500.-, Joseph Platnauer, Bristol, large size mahogany wall timepiece for stations or administrations, circa 1840. Painted convex dial with signature, Roman numerals for the hours and graduations for the minutes, every five marked by a triangle, blued steel hands, cast convex bezel and moulded mahogany outer with a high curve domed glass. Single gut fusee movement with rectangular plates with cut upper corners united by four knopped pillars, recoil anchor escapement. Single strike on the hour on a large bronze bell. Autonomy 8 days. Dimensions, External diameter 18” (48 cm), dial diameter 15” (38cm), overall depth 7 1/2 ” (19cm), Bibliography, Brian Loomes, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, NAG Press, 1984. Price, € 6500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
5 700 GBP

Cathedral

French “Cathedral” Clock, second Quarter Of The 19th Century, circa 1830, the case in patinated bronze of two different colours and ormolu. Paris-type movement with recoil anchor escapement and silk-suspended pendulum, made by Honoré Pons and stamped Pons - Médaille d’Or 1827. Half-hourly countwheel strike on a steel gong placed in the base and chiming to the sound of a local church bell. Autonomy two weeks. The clock dial, set in the façade in place of the rosette window, the enamelled metal dial painted to give the illusion of stained glass, the individual Roman-hour chapters in blue on white enamel, the blued steel hands in the form of partridge eyes (oeuil-de-perdrix); the case, the majority in patinated dark green or brown, the details accented in chased gilded bronze, backed with bright enamel-painted brass panels to give the illusion of stained glass; on a tulipwood veneer base enclosing the chime; original glass dome. Height 48 cm (19"), with base 57 cm (22 1/2"), with base and dome 61 cm (24") Width 32 cm (12 1/2"), with base 43 cm (17") Depth 15 cm (6"), with base 24 cm (9 1/2"), In 1789, Honoré Pons entered the workshop of Antide Janvier, who, in 1798, recommended him to the prestigious firm of Lepaute where he was hired as a clockmaker. On 9 January 1804, the young horologist presented his Observations sur l’échappement libre (Observations on a detached escapement) to the French Academy of Sciences, which earned him laudatory reviews and a commendation from the Academy. At thirty, Pons set up shop as a clockmaker on rue de la Huchette in Paris. In 1807, he was assigned by the State to revive the clockmaking industry of Saint-Nicolas-d'Aliermont, an important horology centre, near Dieppe, that comprised no fewer than 27 workshops. Known for his outstanding quality, Pons’ work had considerable influence on numerous renowned clockmakers. By the end of 1808 Pon’s success was already noted by academy scholars in their traditional report to Emperor Napoleon I on the progress of the sciences in France: ‘A few young individuals stand out, demonstrating notable talent and who […] one day will take the place of today’s great masters. The first of these, M. Pons, is not far from their ranks. His escapements are excellent; he has a passion for his art; he is an inventive thinker; his pinion and wheel cutting machine is an ingenious idea.’, Pons introduced machinery and production line methods for his Paris-style movements, which allowed for the considerable increase in production – up to 5000 movements per year – needed to supply the new industrial bourgeoisie’s strong demand for mantel clocks. In this manner he succeeded in developing the industry, while his participation at the Paris exhibitions earned him numerous awards for his perfectly crafted movements and remarkable precision timepieces; he received a Silver Medal in 1819 and 1823, and a Gold Medal in 1827, 1834, 1839 and 1844. After his death, the firm continued under the direction of Borromée Delépine in partnership with Cauchy, then, after the death of Delépine in October 1860, his son took over in a partnership with Barrois. The Delépine family received nothing less than a gold medal at the 1900 World’s Fair in Paris. The firm that was founded one hundred years earlier by Pons, had grown to 300 employees. As a true pioneer of the industrialisation of French clockmaking, Pons’ impact was considerable. All clockmakers of great renown were influenced by the quality of his work, in one-way or another. Bibliography: Laurent de Commines, Eric Gizard, Un âge d'or des Arts décoratifs 1814-1848, Grand Palais, RMN 1991; Chavigny Richard, ‘Pierre-Honoré-César Pons, pionnier de l'horlogerie industrielle’, Bulletin de l'ANCAHA, no. 80, 1997; Pierre Kjellberg, Encyclopédie de la pendule française du Moyen Age au XXe siècle, Ed. L’amateur, 2005. € 14000.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
12 200 GBP

George Prior

Wall-mounted Bracket Clock with lock, for the Ottoman market, circa 1790. Movement with two fusees and gutline transmission, anchor recoil escapement, spring suspended pendulum with adjustment under the bob. Hourly rack strike on a bronze bell above. Finely engraved rear plate bearing the signature or George Prior, London. Autonomy 8 days. Similarly signed enamel dial with Ottoman numerals for the five-minute markers and the hours. Strike suppressor lever (STRIKE – SILENT) above the numeral 60. Finely cut and gilt brass hands. Oak case with ebonized peartree veneer with varnished or gilt applied bronze lining and accessories. Side panels finely cut in the Oriental fashion, with silk back lining, allowing for the sound to go through while keeping the dust outside. Stylized lying crescent above the dial to underline the Easterly character. A very ingenious and unusual assembly system makes the whole assembly theft-proof; the clock is assembled with its bracket through two hand-screws hidden inside the bracket. The bracket cover also locks in place with a key, and the whole does not allow access to the wall screws, unless separated first. It is also to be noted that the two upper side panels can be easily removed for a technical access. Overall Height 72 cm (28 ¼”), W. 32 cm (12 ½”), D. 20 cm (8”), George Prior is recorded as active in Prescott St, London between 1765 and 1810. He was rewarded with the Silver Medal assorted with 25 guineas by the Arts Society for the invention of a new clock escapement, and rewarded again with 20 guineas for making a remontoire, which he patented in 1818. He was mostly known for supplying watches and clocks to the Ottoman market. Richard Barder, The Georgian Bracket Clock 1714-1830, 1993; G.H. Baillie, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, 1925; F.J.Britten, Old Clocks and Watches & Their Makers, 1904. € 13500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
11 800 GBP

Verneaux

Small table "wedding" clock in ormolu and Vernis Martin, Louis XV-period, circa 1760; three-train movement with verge escapement and silk suspension. Quarter-strike on three silvered bells, two countwheels, a small lever on the left of the dial allows for the easy setting up of the hourly strike. Beautifully engraved signature Verneaux à Paris on the rear plate. Three-weeks autonomy. Large enamel dial with blue Roman numerals for the hours, Arabic numerals for the five minutes and gold stars for the half-hours, similar signature. Finely cut and engraved gilt hands. Oak case decorated in the Vernis Martin fashion with painted white roses on a dark blue background. Very fine fire-gilded bronze work with flowers, shells, and various scrolls, two fish scale widows on the sides, and surmounted by the two kissing doves symbolizing love. H. 19" (48 cm), W. 10 ¾" (27 cm), D. 6" (15 cm), († before 1781), father of Henry-François. Made master on January 4th, 1747 by privilege of the Hôpital de la Trinité. Garde-Visiteur (1760-1762 and 1767-1769). Rue Saint-Martin (1748), rue de la Comédie-Française (1767), rue des Fossés-Saint-Germain-des-Prés (1768), rue de Bussy (1768), rue des Fossés-Monsieur-le-Prince (1775). He retired around 1774. Specialised in clocks, especially porcelain clocks, he also used bronze cases from Osmond. The Duchess of Bedford, then Ambassador of England, bought two gilt clocks from him around 1762 and 1763, she then placed them in London and Woburnabbey on her return in 1763. Tardy Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Paris, 1972; Jean-Dominique Augarde Les Ouvriers du Temps, La Pendule à Paris de Louis XIV à Napoléon Ier, Genève 1996. Lisbon, Musea Nacional de Arte Antigua. € 14500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
12 600 GBP

Leroy

Scientific and observation chronometer, sold in 1913 , signed L. Leroy 7 Bd de la Madeleine à Paris, also signed No. 1210 Leroy & Cie on an ivory panel. The main movement is of a typical marine chronometer, with silvered dial and Roman numerals, with first subsidiary dial under the numeral XII indicating the 56-hour power reserve, and second subsidiary dial above VI for the seconds. Signature and serial number in the centre. Powered by a main barrel with fusee and spring-detent escapement, it being prolonged in a square to be used as a stop-start to the additional movement specially made for the transmission of an electrical impulse every second or half-second. An ingenious cam system allows for the transmission of either an impulse or an interruption of continuous current every second or half second at will. This second movement, especially designed for this instrument, also works with fusee and chain, cams and electrical switches, and has a power reserve of 7 hours. All these special options are switchable through the front panel, just underneath the main dial. The chronometer is encased in a rectangular mahogany box with two lids. The first, with a glass panel, provides access to the dials and functions; the second provides access to a bottom compartment containing the key and space to store documents. The lower panel allows for sliding sideways with two holes for winding both movements separately. On the side are placed the three holes for the electrical contactors. Black text on ivory panel reads: No. 1210 Leroy & Cie, Presented in its original padded and numbered mahogany storage box with external handle. In very good condition and perfect working order. Historical note:, Historical note: Sold by Leroy in 1913 to Thomas Mercer & Co (the pre-eminent manufacturer and retailer of marine chronometers in Great Britain) who retailed it to Mr. Ferrié. H. 10.7 cm (4.2 in); W. 17.1 cm (6.7 in); D. 23.5 cm (9.3 in) Box dimensions: H. 15.6 cm (6.1 in); W. 24.3 cm (9.6 in); D. 30.9 cm (12.2 in), This observation chronometer made by the firm L. Leroy is characteristic of the instruments produced for marine and military use. It is also a perfect example of what was considered to be the most accurate timepiece produced by French chronometer makers during the first half of the nineteenth century. The coveted title ‘Clockmaker to the Navy’ (Horloger de la Marine) successively awarded by the King and then by the State to the most pre-eminent clockmakers, gave Leroy the equivalent recognition of ‘supreme master’ (brevet de maîtrise suprême) in the art of precision timekeeping. Leaving an indelible mark in the history of chronometry, his achievement was consecrated after obtaining 349 medals from the Besançon Observatory – a record that still stands to this day. The Leroy company archives, comprising sales records of almost 400,000 timepieces, reveal the names of thousands of clients, often famous and powerful figures. A study of the documentation concerning the ‘Production nos./Chronometers and Astronomical Clocks’, reveals that our chronometer (no. 1210) was sold on 21 May 1913 to Thomas Mercer & Co, one of the most prolific makers of luxury chronometers, and undoubtedly the most reputed firm in its day. As indicated in the records, this purchase was intended for a certain ‘Monsieur Ferrié’, who it will be shown, was, as an inventor, closely tied to the development of the prestigious firm L. Leroy, established then in the heart of the Grands Boulevards of Haussmannian Paris. After his reputation was cemented at the 1900 Universal Exhibition in Paris, Leroy turned his attention to the development of scientific, military, industrial, and sports chronometry. This led to a collaboration in 1910 between L. Leroy, the aforementioned Gustave Ferrié and the Paris Observatory, to install the first radio time signal transmission station atop the Eiffel Tower, allowing the broadcast by telegraphic code of the national reference time over an area spanning 6000 km (3728 mi). A master clock known as a ‘constant-pressure regulator’ drove the transmission system. Accurate to 1/100 of a second, protected by heavy glass domes and lowered into wells twenty-five meters deep to avoid vibrations, these timekeeping instruments were the most precise and reliable built to date. In the 1920s, they became the basis for the reference time used by the majority of national observatories worldwide, from China to the United States, as well as Switzerland. As such, it is possible to suppose that Ferrié, just nominated president of the International Commission of Longitudes in 1912, used his Leroy chronometer to measure the precise time from the summit of the Eiffel Tower. By inventing the first regularly scheduled time service, which standardized time nationwide, this ingenious engineer, who later became general, also made it possible for ships to determine their position at sea, revolutionizing the way longitude was determined. It is also thanks to Ferrié that in 1904 the Eiffel Tower officially became a military radiotelegraph station, and served as of 1921 as an antenna mast for broadcasting radio programs. Furthermore, these countless benefits were able to spare the now-famous monument from certain demolition; the tower was built for the 1889 Universal Exhibition in commemoration of the centenary of the French Revolution and was scheduled for demolition in 1909, when its 20-year lease expired. GUSTAVE FERRIÉ (1868-1932), GUSTAVE FERRIÉ (1868-1932) When on 21 January 1904 the Eiffel Tower became an official wireless telegraph communications station, Gustave Ferrié was in charge of the exploration and implementation of wireless telegraph stations for military purposes, using the tower to mount antennas for long-range telegraphy. In 1914, Ferrié, then a colonel, was named director of the committee of French military radio communications (TSF), setting up a radiotelegraphy network during World War I. With the strategic role of the Eiffel Tower in Paris confirmed, another station was built in Lyon for safety reasons. Ferrié also further developed military communication research, equipped the French and Allied forces, and developed a colonial network thanks to this new communications technology. Promoted to Brigadier-General in 1919, Gustave Ferrié became General Inspector of military telegraphy and transmission services. In 1921 he received the Osiris Prize, the most prestigious prize medal awarded by the Institute de France, and in 1922 he was elected member of the Academy of Sciences. By the end of his life, he presided over thirty-two international scientific organisations. Every year, the Mayor of Paris awards the General Ferrié Prize to a researcher who has distinguished him or herself in the field of communications. Tony Mercer, Chronometer Makers of the World, NAG Press 1991; Michel Amoudry, Le Général Ferrié, Presse Universitaire de Grenoble, 1993; Maison Leroy, company brochure. € 14500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
12 600 GBP

Richard Volkaerts

Precision wall regulator, masterpiece from Richard VOLKAERTS in 1920, Brussels Professional School of Precision Mechanics and Electricity. Extremely robust construction movement with thick plates and four large pillars screwed on both sides, all the wheels with high count pinions, Graham escapement, steel suspension with double blade, powered by a single weight with pulley offset through the top inside right of the case allowing for a fifteen-day autonomy. Steel rod pendulum with micrometric crutch adjustment, graduated adjustment on the cylindrical bob, with lead mass freely resting on the bottom giving temperature compensation by this simple means. Original crank key. The plates and the cylinder wheel nicely machined patterned. Large silvered dial with Roman numerals for the hours, bearing the signature ECOLE PROFelle DE MÉCANIQUE DE PRÉCISION ET D'ELECTRICITÉ DE BRUXELLES, RICHARD VOLKAERTS 1920. Three blued steel hands, with center sweeping seconds hand. Very solidly and finely made oak case, with heavy bevelled glass on the three sides, with protruding lozenge mouldings on top and spandrel mouldings on both top sides of the dial. The whole assembly is held by two solid hooks on top. Left-side closing door with key. The Brussels Professional School of Precision Mechanics and Electricity, that was to become later the Arts and Crafts School of Brussels, held the reputation of being one of the finest clock-making school in the World in the 20th Century years preceding the Second World War. As an end of school project, the students had to entirely manufacture a precision regulator of a given design. They were left with some liberties for some of the execution details, and these finished works were to become their masterpiece, that were to stay with them for the rest of their career, so as to demonstrate their skill, but also to regulate all the other time instruments that they would work on. The case was also manufactured by student cabinetmakers from the same prestigious school, allowing them to demonstrate their best assembly skills. 'The case is made from quarter-sawn oak, showing extensive medullary rays typical for wood cut in this manner. For those that don’t recognize the term, Medullary rays are the tree’s nutrient “transport lines”, extending from the air pores in the bark to the center, or core of the tree. They are the often wavy patterns one sees in quarter-sawn oak that usually run nearly perpendicular to the grain of the wood. The advantage of quarter-sawn lumber is its enhanced stability - it does not warp, twist or shrink and expand as much as lumber that is cut in a more conventional manner. And, the medullary rays add a beautiful counterpoint to the very plain grain of typical oak.", Dimensions: Height 5' 11" (180cm), Width 1' 7" (48cm), Depth 10 1/4" (26cm), € 14000.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
12 200 GBP

Mathieu

Small portable Table Clock signed Mathieu l'Aîné A Paris, and dated 1776. 8-day duration rectangular movement with two simplified Maltese crosses on the barrels. Rack strike for the hours and half hours on a silvered bell situated below. Later cylinder escapement placed directly on the rear plate, with fine regulation graduations, allowing for transport without stopping. Enamel dial with Roman numerals for the hours and Arabic numerals for the 5-minute graduations, signed on the reverse by the dial-maker Barbezat and dated 1776. Lower cartouche with the clockmaker's signature Mathieu Aîné à Paris. Hinged turned and gilt brass bezel with a domed glass, 31-day silvered calendar through a window above 60, and 7-day week calendar on a horizontal disk above it. Finely cut and engraved brass gilt hands. Ormolu case with four glasses allowing a view of the movement through the two sides, the opening rear door and the top. Front ormolu decorations with Apollo in a medaillon above, surmounted by a knot of ribbons and acanthus leaves, the two lower corners with palm leaves and acanthus branches. Four ormolu turned topee feet surround the bell below, four ormolu urns and a foldable substantial handle on top. Height (handle up) 9 ¼" (24cm), Width 5” (13cm), Depth 3 ½” (9cm), Known as L'AÎNÉ (1722-† after 1812) son of Claude, gardener, and Jeanne Douine. Married first to Jeanne-Marguerite Philipart, then to Anne Bogotte. Made compagnon in Paris in 1743, he presented his masterpiece in 1754, and was received as a master on the 31 July of that year by decree of 25 June exempting him from lack of apprenticeship.. He was established Rue Neuve des Capucines (1754), then rue Saint-Honoré accross the Hôtel de Noailles (1757). He was selling watches, clocks and articles of clothing ; he became a member of the Jury presiding over the matters of the new Time system in 1793. His business was carried on by his son-in-law B.L. Petit. Claude Mathieu used clock cases by P. Delacroix, M. Poisson and watch cases by J. de La Feuille. Many great collectors were his customers, amongst which was the Count de La Marck. One of his best creations was the clock “Vase with Allegories of Study and Geography”. It has a movement with rotating rings indicating the hours and minutes, and a separate dial with astronomical indications. It was delivered with the furnishing of the Michel Palace built by the Emperor Paul Ist in Saint Petersburg in 1798. It is to be found now in the Great Palace of the Kremlin in Moscow. Tardy, Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Paris, 1972 ; Jean-Dominique Augarde, Les Ouvriers du Temps, La Pendule à Paris de Louis XIV à Napoléon Ier. Great Palace of the Kremlin in Moscow, € 16000.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
14 000 GBP

Mazilier – Odalisque by Pradier

White marble and patinated bronze mantel clock, signed MAZILIER à Metz, with the bronze statue of an "Odalisque" after James Pradier, 1870. French movement, made from an ébauche by Vincenti & Cie. Brocot-type half-rollers self-levelling escapement with steel suspension, countwheel strike on a single silvered bell, two-week autonomy. Enamel dial with the signature Mazilier à Metz, with Roman numerals for the hours. Club-style gilt hands, domed glass and pearled gilt bezel. Carrara marble case with gilt bronze applied, the bronze statue representing the Odalisque from James Pradier (1790-1852), with two different coloured patinas: medium brown colour for the flesh, and dark brown for the hair and all clothing and accessories (turban, flowers and fan). The running signature of Pradier is on the cloth just above the dial. H. 50cm (19 ½ ‘’), W. 39cm (15 ½’’), D. 25cm (9 ¾’’) Statue only: H. 28cm (11’’), W. 28cm (11’’), D. 24cm (9 ½’’), The clockmaker Mazilier is recorded as active in Metz, second half of the 19th C. For more on James Pradier, see the PDF document below. Tardy, Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Paris, 1972 ; Statues de Chair, sculptures de James Pradier, Musée d’Art et d’Histoire, Genève 1985 ; Claude Lapaire, James Pradier et la sculpture française de la génération romantique, catalogue raisonné, SIK-ISEA Institut Suisse pour l’Etude de l’Art, 2010. Louvre Museum, Paris; Musée d'Orsay, Paris; Montpellier Fine Arts Museum; Geneva Fine Arts Museum, and many more. € 16000.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
14 000 GBP

Manberger

Carriage Clock with Simulated-Bamboo Case signed Enrique Manberger Madrid, mid- to late 19th Century. The movement with maltese crosses on both winders and alarum, for better timekeeping, English-style crabtooth-escapement platform with cut bi-metallic balance wheel and gold adjusting screws. Hourly and half-hourly gong strike with repeat feature by a button on top of the case. Alarum striking the same gong. Eight-days autonomy. Hexagonal dials, with nickelled and gilded ‘bamboo’ borders, on a silvered and gilt-brass ground reminiscent of ivory. Porcelain dials with Arabic numerals, each within a finely crafted cartouche. Arbalète or ‘crossbow’ blued-steel hands indicating the hours, minutes and the alarm on the subsidiary dial. Signature Enrique Manberger MADRID (clockmaker/retailer); produced in France. The case, with bevelled glass on five sides allows view of entire movement, assembled with intersecting ‘bamboo poles’, gilded and nickelled for a nice contrast-enhancing effect. Original leather storage box; original double-ended winding key. Height with handle upright: 19.5 cm (7 ½ in); Width: 10 cm (3 7/8 in); Depth: 9 cm (3 ½ in). LP is the signature of Paris-based clockmaker Louis-Auguste Pointeaux (1809-1885). He invented a coup perdu escapement that was used on mantel clocks with half-seconds beating pendulums, and some very sophisticated travelling clocks with up to 12 winding holes (!). He exhibited in London in 1852. He created the large longcase clock, presently at rue de Rivoli in Paris, for the firm C. Detouche. He was established at Rue Chérubini from 1850 to 1880. coup perdu, Tardy, Dictionnaire des horlogers français, (Paris, 1972); Derek Roberts, Carriage and Other Travelling Clocks, (Shiffer, Atglen, 1993). € 6500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
  • Dealer
Fixed price
5 700 GBP

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Jacques Nève
Rue des Fonds 2
1440 Braine-le-Château
+32 477 27 19 08
jneve@horloger.net
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