Edition-Originale

ÉDITION-ORIGINALE, also called Le Feu Follet, is a bookshop located in Paris between Port Royal and the Jardin du Luxembourg.

The gallery ÉDITION-ORIGINALE brings together rare and valuable books, manuscripts, autographed books, etc.

This bookshop offers a very wide selection for all literature lovers: old books (1455-1820), literary and artistic journals, science, medicine & technology, religion & spirituality, history books, travel books, books of Fine Art, arts of living and social history.

ÉDITION-ORIGINALE also offers its clients advice on their collection as well as free valuations.

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  • United Kingdom
Objects "Edition-Originale"

Victor HUGO

Victor HUGO Ruy Blas. Drame en 5 actes, en vers Michel Lévy frères, Paris 1872, 12x19cm, relié. Later edition, but partly first thanks to presence of the preface “à la France de 1872 [To the France of 1872]” published on the occasion of the revival of the piece at the Odeon on the 19th February 1872. Half brown shagreen, spine in six compartments, covers preserved. An exceptional autograph inscription from Victor Hugo to his mistress, Juliette Drouet: “Premier exemplaire aux pieds de ma dame [The first copy, laid at the feet of my lady]”. From its very creation until its overdue consecration, the story of Ruy Blas was intimately tied to that of Juliette Drouet. Shut up at home all the while the piece was being written, Juliette was to be its first reader on the 12 August 1838 (Hugo finished writing it on the 11th). She fell in love at once with this romantic drama in which Hugo promised her the title role alongside Frédérick Lemaître : “What a miracle your piece is, my poor beloved, and so good of you to have let me admire it first. Never have I seen anything so wonderful; including even your other masterpieces. It has a richness, a magnificence, a wonder…Oh my darling sun, you have blinded me for so long to come.” Juliette quickly came to know the piece by heart, certain verses strongly evoking the relationship between the author and the actress: “Madam at your feet, in the shadows, there is a man Who loves you, lost in the enveloping night; Who suffers as an earthworm enamored of a star; Who would give his soul for you, if he might; And who lowly dies while on high you shine” (Act II, scene 2). On the 15th August, Hugo confirmed her casting in the role of Doña Maria de Neubourg. Juliette could hope for no finer proof of his love: “I see glory, happiness, love and adoration, all this in huge and impossible measure…” Unfortunately, far from presaging the hoped-for glory, this news marked the start of open hostilities from Adèle, who until this point had stayed out of her husband’s adulterous relationship. At the end of the summer, Adèle wrote to the director of the theatre: “I foresee the success of the piece being compromised…because the role of the Queen was given to someone who was involved in the scandal over Mary Tudor…Opinion…is against…the talents of Mlle Juliette…This lady is said to be having an affair with my husband. While I am personally convinced that these rumors have no basis whatsoever in fact…the end result is the same…I have some hope that you…will give the role to someone else.” It was, in fact, Frédérick Lemaître’s lover who got it in the end. Juliette did not hide her helplessness: “I carry in me my mourning for a fine and admirable role which is dead to me for ever…I am more upset than you can possibly imagine.” And, even if Ruy Blas was not the success they’d hoped for, her passion for the piece remained: “I spilled all my blood for you, for your piece.” On the 5th December 1867, when the Odeon mooted a revival of the piece, Napoleon III had it banned because “we don’t want the scandal over Hernani breaking out again.” Juliette was more upset by this injustice than Hugo himself, as her voluminous correspondence attests. Her letters on this subject are collected in Paul Souchon’s work (Autour de Ruy Blas. Lettres inédites de Juliette Drouet à Victor Hugo, Albin Michel, 1939). She fought for her reinstatement for years and, when Ruy Blas was finally revived at the Odeon in 1872, she took part in and commented on every step of the process. Thus, coming out of the first reading by Hugo to the actors on the 2nd January 1872, she wrote: “Victory, my great beloved! Your entire audience left with profound and enthusiastic feelings…Ruy Blas from the first word to the last is the masterpiece of masterpieces. I came out transported, ecstatic, full of the same love and admiration and adoration for you as the first time I heard you. All that was with me just now at yours when I was the most transported and the most moved, more so than the author of the piece. I am ashamed to express this to you so poorly, but I had to give in to the needs of my heart, which is bursting with your genius and my love. There it is, my love, and I rush to kiss your wings and your feet.” With Sarah Bernhardt in the role of the Queen, the piece was a triumph which grew and grew with each performance. The day after the premiere, Juliette commented on this consecration, for which she had been waiting for more than thirty years: “You see, my love, that I was telling the truth about the prodigious and formidable enthusiasm of the entire audience yesterday. Never have you had, never could you have, a better reception. It was total delirium, growing with each verse. Your sublime poetry conquered every soul and one could feel the rivers of adoration flowing from all their hearts. The thunderous applause was so strong and so sustained that every hand sparked with electricity…And as for you, I feel that in this blessed month there is renewed love for you and it seems that all my fine memories are blooming once more and perfuming my soul with happiness. And I wanted to lay at your feet a divine bouquet”. It was Victor Hugo who in the end laid “at the feet of [his] lady” this masterpiece of Romanticism and testimony to their legendary love. 20 000 € Réf : 44135 OrderRead more

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Louis-Ferdinand CELINE

Louis-Ferdinand CELINE Voyage au bout de la nuit Denoël & Steele, Paris 1932, 12x19cm, broché sous étui. First edition, one of 100 numbered copies on alfa paper, this one of the few nominative hors commerce copies, printed specially for Jean Ballard, the only large paper copies with 10 on Arches paper, also nominative. §Handsome autograph inscription from Louis-Ferdinand Céline to Jean Ballard, director of Cahiers du Sud, which published extracts from Voyage just before its publication, as well as one of the longest reviews devoted to the work. §Few people recognized at first the importance of this debut novel. Céline pitched the manuscript to Gallimard, Bossart, Figuière and of course Denoël, who were the only ones to show any real enthusiasm. Nonetheless, they printed only 2,000 copies and reached out to a number of reviews to publish extracts, including Cahiers du Sud, Europe, and Monde a few days before publication. Nominative copies on Arches or alfa paper, reserved for those close to the author, are even more sought after than the 110 large paper copies commercially sold. Unnumbered for the most part, they have still not been counted precisely. Therefore, we still only know the copies of R. Beckers, M. Dorian, J. Ajalbert, L. Daudet, L. and M. Descaves (on Arches), R.-L. Doyon, L. Hennique, G. Picard, Rosny jeune, C. Dullin and V. Moremans, R. Gallier and J. Ballard. These copies do not have the publisher’s advertising brochure at end. §This copy is in a box by Julie Nadot, reproducing the original cover of the work. §A very good and rare copy. % 45 000 € Réf : 40557 OrderRead more

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Gustave FLAUBERT

Gustave FLAUBERT Madame Bovary Michel Lévy frères, Paris 1857, 10,5x17cm, 2 volumes reliés en 1. Original edition. Binding open eggplant sorrow, back with four nerves purposes set with triple gilt fillets decorated with cold boxes, cold rollers on caps and cuts, framing quintuple gold striping and a wide net on the cold dishes, lace golden framing of contreplats, guards and contreplats silk moiré cream, light freckles on minor contreplats and guards, all edges gilt, bookplate pasted on a contreplat a clear wetting minor in the first foot slips the book, elegant contemporary binding (which occurs just as Clouzot). Very rare autograph signed by the author Alfred Guerard, close friend of Bouilhet which is dedicated to the book: "Alf. Guerard Remember friendship Gustave Flaubert " (The last letters of the word friendship and Flaubert's name was trimmed by the bookbinder). Autographs shipments are rare on Flaubert Madame Bovary. (See Clouzot). Alfred Guerard was with Gustave Flaubert closest friend Bouilhet. This large industrial Rouen was also a friend of the arts and a true patron Bouilhet who dedicated several works. Flaubert, as evidenced by his correspondence, was not wanting to invite him to his literary or artistic dinners. It will include, in 1863, one of the very few listeners Castle hearts, magic aborted knew that this "solemn reading before an Areopagus" Flaubert selects among his friends from high society: "We wanted to have a bourgeois public to judge the effect of the naive work "(see the letters to his niece Caroline in December 1863). Nice copy with autograph sending richly established contemporary binding. 23 000 € Réf : 46560 OrderRead more

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Marcel PROUST

Marcel PROUST Le côte de Guermantes Nrf, Paris 1920, 14x19,5cm, broché sous étui. First edition on ordinary paper, falsely stated third edition. Handsome autograph inscription from Marcel Proust to André Salmon. Two small lacks to the spine, skillfully and discreetly repaired. Retaining the double errata leaf. This copy is in a full black morocco box, the interior lined with khaki green sheep by Goy & Vilaine. Dans ses "Souvenirs sans fin", Salmon relate les circonstances de cette "rencontre" improbable entre deux univers littéraires qui se sont peu côtoyés, la bohème des Montparnos et les salons aristocratiques que fréquentait Proust :"Si je n'ai pas connu Proust, nous avons correspondu.C'est lui qui vint à moi, de la façon la plus exquise et aussi la moins attendue.Je venais de donner à la Nouvelle Revue Française (mars 1920) une fable réaliste: "Le Mannequin d'acajou", quelque chose dont je n'aurais jamais soupçonné que cela pût séduire l'observateur, le féroce adorateur, oui subjugué et méprisant, de la duchesse de Guermantes, Oriane, haïssable créature digne de l'exposition publique. (...) Marcel Proust m'écrivit dès aussitôt sa lecture de Mannequin d'acajou. Il m'offrirait aussi de ses livres, avec de précieuses dédicaces. Sans doute ai-je répondu à Marcel Proust. Je ne lui ai pas rendu visite. Correspondre avec lui comptait pour moi. Je n'ai pu me résoudre à me rendre à son chevet (...) et, surtout, à m'asseoir parmi tant d'autres dont les délectations ne furent jamais les miennes. Bien entendu pas question d'aller joindre Marcel Proust à minuit, au Ritz où je suis peu connu du personnel.Ai-je eu tort? en tout cas, Marcel Proust ne m'en garda pas rancune. Il put m'avoir bien compris, deviné. Non seulement il m'écrivit encore, mais il écrivit à d'autres dans l'intention de me servir. "En effet, à la suite de la publication de cette nouvelle Proust proposa le nom de Salmon avec celui de Rivière pour l'obtention des deux bourses Blumenthal, malheureusement Salmon avait déja atteint l'age limite et ce fut André Thérive qui obtint la seconde bourse. André Salmon n'apprendra ce soutien qu'en 1951 en lisant dans la Revue de Paris des lettres inédites de Proust à E. Jaloux: "Je détache celle qu'à mon propos il eut la gentillesse d'écrire, en grelottant de fièvre (...):"Votre conclusion semble donc être Salmon, ce qui est d'ailleurs celle à laquelle je m'étais arrêté avec Gide. Je trouve que la raison qu'on a fait valoir (le prix lui permettra de ne pas faire de journalisme) est très mauvaise. Mais le talent est une raison suffisante. (...) ". (Cf. A. Salmon, Souvenirs sans fin, p. 807-809) 13 500 € Réf : 52845 OrderRead more

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11 900 GBP

Marcel PROUST

Marcel PROUST A la recherche du temps perdu Grasset & Nrf, Paris 1913-1927, 12x19cm pour le premier volume & 13x19,5cm pour le second & 14,5x19,5cm pour les suivants, 13 volumes brochés sous coffrets. The first edition with all the characteristics of the first issue of the first volume (Grasset error, the first plate dated 1913, no table of contents, publisher’s catalogue at end), one of the Service de Presse (advance) copies (the head of the second plate marked with the publisher’s initials). The first edition on ordinary paper with a false edition statement stating the fifth for the second volume. Numbered first editions on pur fil paper, the re-impositions on large paper only for the other volumes. This complete set of In Search of Lost Time bears three important, attractive inscriptions from Marcel Proust to Lucien Descaves : “à monsieur Lucien Descaves. / Hommage de l’auteur. / Marcel Proust” in Du côté de chez Swann. “à monsieur Lucien Descaves. / Respectueux hommage de l’auteur. / Marcel Proust” in Le Côté de Guermantes II - Sodome et Gomorrhe I. “à monsieur Lucien Descaves. / Admiratif hommage. / Marcel Proust” in Sodome et Gomorrhe II-1. Each of the thirteen volumes is present in a full black morocco box, spines in the Jansenist style with date at foot, the interior lined with khaki green sheep by Goy & Vilaine. The copy of Swann is, furthermore, preserved within a chemise and slipcase of decorative paper and edged with ochre cloth, as is typically the case with books from the library of Lucien Descaves. Inscribed copies of Swann’s Way are themselves of the utmost rarity, but this one is moreover testimony to the ‘young’ author’s first attempts to approach the prestigious Académie Goncourt, of which Lucien Descaves was one of the founding members. The stormy deliberations of 1919 are often brought up with regard to Proust and the Goncourt, but what people usually omit to mention is that, urged on by Grasset (cf. letters to M. Barres and R. de Flers, v. XII, letters 127 and 155) Proust manifested an ardent desire, right from 1913 on, to be submitted to the verdict of the Ten, and made a number of moves in this direction: “My publisher [had me send] my book…to the Goncourt judges. Officially, it’s not too late, they’re still accepting books, but I think the winner is already more or less decided. There remains the hope that if I could find - not having one as yet - someone to act as advocate for the book, who could make sure it was discussed, it would carve a way for my work so that they’d read it, which is all I could hope for…I am very much afraid that no one will read me, because it’s so long and tightly packed. But perhaps…you have some friends in the Académie Goncourt. There are two judges with whom it’s not worth bothering. The elder Rosny, because Madame Tinayre (whom I don’t know but who, it appears, has a predilection for my writing) has already recommended the book to him (without having read the rest); and Léon Daudet who will most likely not take my part, but with whom I am too closely tied to be able to put myself forward without making a fool of myself. Finally, Louis de Robert, (all this off the top of my head, for this letter that I’m writing is my first step in all this) has written to Paul Margueritte. But I don’t think that’ll have much effect. Perhaps you know someone else? There are, I believe, Geffroy, Rosny junior, Elémir Bourges, Descaves (but I doubt he’d come back for this), Mirbeau…In any case, perhaps all this will be in vain. I just wanted to mention it, in case,” (letter of the 8th November – the date the printers finished the book – to Madame de Pierrebourg, XII, 140). Madame de Pierrebourg did not know anyone and Louis de Robert’s efforts came up against an obstacle, namely Proust’s independent means: “As for the prize, there’s something quite comic in that at a time when I’m…more or less ruined…my fortune should be an obstacle!” (letter to Louis de Robert, XII, 164). For his part, Léon Daudet – to whom he had, in fact, turned for support – held his age against him: “As for the Goncourt…I shall certainly mention your book to my friends. But…but the majority don’t want to vote for an author over the age of 35 [underlined]…I, happily, do not share this disposition,” (XII, 144). Resigned, Proust nonetheless hopes to be mentioned by the Academicians: “It seems impossible that I should have the prize…In any case, if my book is discussed by the Goncourt jury, it will in some measure make up for the distance I’ve been at for some years from literary life, which means that at my age I am less well-known than a number of people just starting out. Perhaps in seeing my book deliberated over by the jury, some people will decide to read it, and who knows if there won’t be among them some friend to my thinking who without this would never have discovered it,” (XII, 170). But none of the members referred to Swann during their deliberations and only the elder Rosny, according to Proust “gave [me] a voice” (XVIII, 221). When In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower did win the prize in 1919 (despite the same obstacles of Proust’s age and fortune) Lucien Descaves disagreed with the decision, preferring instead Dorgelès’ Les Croix de bois. Proust mentions his animosity in a letter to the Abbé Mugnier: “I’m sorry that you found out [about the Goncourt prize] from Monsieur Descaves, because he must have accompanied this piece of good news with some rather unflattering comments. In effect, he had campaigned against me and presented the results in the following terms: Monsieur Proust has the prize; Monsieur Dorgelès has the originality of talent and youth. You can’t have it all.” Proust goes on to add: “Don’t think I harbor the least resentment towards Monsieur Descaves. Those who don’t like my books are of exactly the same opinion as me,” (XVIII, 333). The copies of The Guermantes Way and Sodom and Gomorrah that Proust gave to this harsh critic of his are proof of the honesty of this statement and the respect he had for the author despite their differences. For his part, ‘the Bear’, as Lucien Descaves called himself, took great care of his copy of Swann in protecting it with a slipcase and chemise, no doubt aware of the importance of this founding work of modern literature. Nonetheless, one can note that he stopped reading Sodom at page 153, after which the quires are no longer opened. In his study on Proust and the Goncourt prize, Luc Fraysse highlights that “the awarding of the Goncourt prize to Proust in 1919 for In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower is a major literary event in 20th century history…It was an unparalleled summit in the life of the Académie Goncourt…[and] a decisive and definitive turning point in the literary evolution [of Proust]…[who] went – with no intermediate stage – from relative obscurity to world-wide fame. It was the Goncourt prize that led a larger readership to discover the depth and importance of Proust’s work.” An exceptional set of In Search of Lost Time as it appeared, bearing three attractive signed autograph inscriptions from Marcel Proust to Lucien Descaves. 85 000 € Réf : 52634 OrderRead more

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Victor HUGO

Victor HUGO La pitié suprême Michel Lévy, Paris 1879, 15,5x23,5cm, relié. Original edition. Binding half old red grief with some discreet restorations, back with five nerves, when tail, paper plates to the tank, and contreplats combed guards lined paper, preserved covers, red head, contemporary binding. Precious autograph signed by Victor Hugo Alphonse Daudet. Buffer library of Madame Daudet on the first guard. Victor Hugo is for Alphonse Daudet, like other writers of his generation, the undisputed master of arts Hall of Fame. His father figure sprinkles the works of Daudet, commonly called alongside those of Rousseau, Byron, Sand and Delacroix. If during childhood and youth Daudet, Hugo, exiled giant on his island of Guernsey, remains an unattainable ideal, "almost beyond humanity," Back in France allows him to meet him someday. Around 1875, shortly after the publication of his first works, Alphonse Daudet and Julia are well received in Hugo who now lives with Juliette Drouet. They therefore become intimate of the house until the poet's death. Victor Hugo is involved in the education of the young Léon Daudet, best friend grand-son of Hugo, George and later husband of Jeanne ephemeral. In his Memories of a literary circle, Julia Daudet evokes friendship of ten years with the "idol of all France poetic" "I see the great Victor Hugo end of his table; the old master, a bit isolated, a little deaf, sits with God silences, absences of a genius on the brink of immortality. The white hair, colored head, and this eye old lion that develops side with power ferocity; he listens to my husband and Catullus Mendes between which is very lively discussion about youth and celebrity known men and their attractiveness to women. [...] During the debate we went to the salon, Victor Hugo dream by the fire, and famous, universal and demigod regret perhaps his youth, while Mrs Drouet sleeping quietly. » The friendship between the last great romantic writer and one of the masters of the early naturalist school reflects the sharpness of Victor Hugo who, at the height of his fame, and retains a special kind attention for the remote yet modern literature Hugo's lyricism. This dedication Hugo Daudet on a skilled, with The Pope and Religions and Religion, of "philosophical testament" by Henri Guillemin, symbolically resonates as a legacy by a devout follower of the political and moral responsibility of the writer. Provenance: Alphonse Daudet, sales Sickles (1990, IV, No. 1200) and Philippe Zoummeroff sale (2 April 2001). Gift extract of a literary circle by Julia Daudet: "How can we forget that first visit home, rue de Clichy, in the modest apartment so disproportionate to his glory, the idea we had of the glory that had filled palaces: He gets up the seat he occupied the fire in front of Madame Drouet, his old friend, (...) I am amazed at its size, but soon, when it will meet me and talk to me, I would find it very big, very intimidating. And this I felt so shy, I always try them in front of Victor Hugo, the result of this great admiration, respect it as an absent god, my parents instilled in me the genius of a poet. I will overcome never that trembling voice every time I answer his kind words, and I say astonish for nearly years to hear women, admitted to him, maintain their inner and their usual trivia. That night, when he had made me quite confused, Mrs Drouet, she said with a charming good grace - Here is the corner of the old and you are too young for us. But Victor Hugo will introduce you to his daughter, Mrs. Lockroy; alone has standing to that. And I was driving on the other side of the room, moderately large, though, but that was as divided in two by a table topped with a bronze elephant, very majestic, Japanese or Chinese, I think. It was enough to make two very distinct small groups that communicate easily, but without merging. At the time of his return, Victor Hugo was dazzling wit, many memories and told with an inexhaustible verve when the policy is not too invading his hospitable table. And grace in the home, what noble ways, what a beautiful smile grandfather in her hair I have gradually seen to blanch the snow eighty years I poets, all the poets attending this salon on Rue de Clichy, later the hotel Avenue d'Eylau. But here it was the change of place? There was like a step down in health, and in the spirit of good old man. Yet he always loved to entertain his friends, and the hospitality of this open house was not one of his charms least because, around the table, embellished with a piece by the two grandchildren of the Master, the guests were seeking their watchword in the eyes of the host, and he sometimes found a vein of memories so vivid, so picturesquely expressed, which remained blinded entire evening. M mo Drouet slowly growing old with him, sheltered under two snow bands, a somewhat theatrical elegance and quaint, until a ruthless evil dug his face so thin, made painful effigy has painted Bastien Lepage, who was to die prey to the same torture. In the recent times, the Master looked painfully, intimate dinners, that empty plate, that noble ravaged face. - Mrs Drouet, you do not eat, you must eat, have courage. Eat! She was dying. Did he know? Was he trying to delude himself the fine old so tough and strong, and who saw this companion from fifty years! In the large room where looks beautiful portrait of Bonnat, the paternal gesture, where the bust by David presides immensely; in the lounge, decorated with these striped multicolored tapestry that seemed strained to Dona Sol; in the garden come to the verandah by a flight of stairs two reappear Leconte de Lisle, Meurice and Vacquerie, Paul de Saint-Victor, smiling Banville, Flaubert and Goncourt conversing together, Mallarmé, Leon Cladel, Francois Coppe, Catullus Mendes, Clovis Hugues, shadows in a faded Eden; and Leon Glaize, Gustave Rivet, Pierre Elzéar, the tiny pink Ms Michelet offering a festive evening, and ambassadors, diplomats, Emperor of Brazil; painters, sculptors, and many politicians that I do not remember the names! Here the immediate impression that I drew one of those evenings when we visited, Alphonse Daudet and me, a snowy evening, where during the ride our horse fell three times across the Esplanade des Invalides: I see the great Victor Hugo end of his table; the old master, a bit isolated, a little deaf, sits with God silences, absences of a genius on the brink of immortality. The white hair, colored head, and this eye old lion that develops side with ferocity of power; he listens to my husband and Catullus Mendes between which is very lively discussion about youth and celebrity known men and their attractiveness to women. Alphonse claims that in a living room filled with all sorts of talents, of any age, a young man, the unknown author, the poet will ignored her female eyes beautiful it is. Catullus Mendes replied that he will initially unnoticed, and that all women will go to awareness: this seems true to me. Fortunately women do not have the eyes of their face, but those of the mind and heart. For the intellectual, the beauty of an artist, a poet does not count, it is the look of the thinker, the tormented face of the man who lives his feelings. They go to the talent, grief passes, they hardly thinking about physical beauty. Now one might reply that this is an ambitious sympathy they seek famous authors, but the other feeling, one that would attract to this tempting youth whose Alphonse speaks, seems less blameless. And I laugh to this claim of two charming conversationalists, generate, analyze us. But to say the woman is like saying the bird; there are so many species and genera, warbling and plumage are so different! During the debate we went to the salon, Victor Hugo dream by the fire, and famous, universal and demigod regret perhaps his youth, while Mrs Drouet sleeping quietly. His beautiful white hair shading his fine head like two wings of a dove, and knots of her bodice following her sweet breath, almost resigned, old woman asleep. It was soon after this event took place the great manifestation of scrolling Paris Avenue d'Eylau, before the windows of the small room that became mortuary in May 1885 filled with roses and simply furnished, such as accounts, museum Victor Hugo, a part taken in the former apartment of the poet, Place Royale. Although suggestive, the old home of the Marsh, "and when you think that there Victor Hugo wrote almost all his historical plays one imagines the poet, opening, the morning hours that were familiar to him, this high window on hotels all equal and same style, around the square, and remembering tournaments, duels, walks and agitations of several generations disappeared under the shadow of these ancient and solid arcades and not keeping track of the fugitive humanity. We still had dinner at Victor Hugo week before his death. He tells us by entering paler than usual, the inflected approach: - I will soon go, I feel it; and then relying on the shoulder of George: No 'that' a long time ago that I would be gone. I have never forgotten the focus rather solemn and as prophetic those words, I was imbued with sadness and foreboding; I felt the dispersion of this unique center and could not re ever! " 12 000 € Réf : 46925 OrderRead more

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