Edition-Originale

ÉDITION-ORIGINALE, also called Le Feu Follet, is a bookshop located in Paris between Port Royal and the Jardin du Luxembourg.

The gallery ÉDITION-ORIGINALE brings together rare and valuable books, manuscripts, autographed books, etc.

This bookshop offers a very wide selection for all literature lovers: old books (1455-1820), literary and artistic journals, science, medicine & technology, religion & spirituality, history books, travel books, books of Fine Art, arts of living and social history.

ÉDITION-ORIGINALE also offers its clients advice on their collection as well as free valuations.

Countries
  • United Kingdom
Objects "Edition-Originale"

Maurice BOUTET DE MONVEL

Maurice BOUTET DE MONVEL Claude et sa soeur. Pelisse et Douillette (pl.10, La Gazette du Bon ton, 1912-1913 n°2) Lucien Vogel éditeur, Paris 1912-1913, 19x24,5cm, une feuille. Original color print, printed on vergé paper, signed in the plate. An original print used to illustrate the Gazette du bon ton, one of the most attractive and influential 20th century fashion magazines, featuring the talents of French artists and other contributors from the burgeoning Art Deco movement. A celebrated fashion magazine established in 1912 by Lucien Vogel, La Gazette du bon ton appeared until 1925, with a hiatus from 1915 to 1920 due to the war (the editor-in-chief having been called up for service). It consisted of 69 issues printed in only 2,000 copies each and notably illustrated with 573 color plates and 148 sketches of the models of the great designers. Right from the start, this sumptuous publication “was aimed at bibliophiles and fashionable society,” (Françoise Tétart-Vittu, “La Gazette du bon ton”, in Dictionnaire de la mode, 2016) and was printed on fine vergé paper using a type cut specially for the magazine by Georges Peignot, known as Cochin, later used (in 1946) by Christian Dior. The prints were made using stencils, heightened in colors, some highlighted in gold or palladium. The story began in 1912, when Lucien Vogel, a man of the world involved in fashion (he had already been part of the fashion magazine Femina) decided, with his wife Cosette de Brunhoff – the sister of Jean, creator of Babar – to set up the Gazette du bon ton, subtitled at the time: “Art, fashion, frivolities.” Georges Charensol noted the reasoning of the editor-in-chief: “’In 1910,’ he observed, ‘there was no really artistic fashion magazine, nothing representative of the spirit of the time. My dream was therefore to make a luxury magazine with truly modern artists…I was assured of success, because when it comes to fashion, no country on earth can compete with France.’” (“Un grand éditeur d’art. Lucien Vogel” in Les Nouvelles littéraires, no. 133, May 1925). The magazine was immediately successful, not only in France but also in the United States and Latin America. At first, Vogel put together a team of seven artists: André-Édouard Marty and Pierre Brissaud, followed by Georges Lepape and Dammicourt, as well as eventually his friends from school and the School of Fine Arts, like George Barbier, Bernard Boutet de Monvel and Charles Martin. Other talented people soon came flocking to join the team: Guy Arnoux, Léon Bakst, Benito, Boutet de Monvel, Umberto Brunelleschi, Chas Laborde, Jean-Gabriel Domergue, Raoul Dufy, Édouard Halouze, Alexandre Iacovleff, Jean Émile Laboureur, Charles Loupot, Chalres Martin, Maggie Salcedo. These artist, mostly unknown when Lucien Vogel sought them out, later became emblematic and sought-after artistic figures. It was also they who worked on the advertising drawings for the Gazette. The plates put the spotlight on, and celebrate, dresses by seven designers of the age: Lanvin, Doeuillet, Paquin, Poiret, Worth, Vionnet and Doucet. The designers provided exclusive models for each issue. Nonetheless, some of the illustrations are not based on real models, but simply on the illustrator’s conception of the fashion of the day. The Gazette du bon ton was an important step in the history of fashion. Combining aesthetic demands with the physical whole, it brought together – for the first time – the great talents of the artistic, literary, and fashion worlds; and imposed, through this alchemy, a completely new image of women: slender, independent and daring, which was shared by the new generation of designers, including Coco Chanel, Jean Patou, Marcel Rochas, and so on… Taken over in 1920 by Condé Montrose Nast, the Gazette du bon ton was an important influence on the new layout and aesthetics of that “little dying paper” that Nast had bought a few years earlier: Vogue.70 € Réf : 54491 Order BookRead more

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • Dealer
Fixed price
60 GBP

Georges LEPAPE

Georges LEPAPE (Jeanne LANVIN) La Leçon mal apprise. Manteau du soir et robe d'enfant, de Jeanne Lanvin (pl.50, La Gazette du Bon ton, 1924 n°9) Lucien Vogel éditeur, Paris 1924, 18x24cm, une feuille. Original color print, printed on vergé paper, signed in the plate. An original print used to illustrate the Gazette du bon ton, one of the most attractive and influential 20th century fashion magazines, featuring the talents of French artists and other contributors from the burgeoning Art Deco movement. A celebrated fashion magazine established in 1912 by Lucien Vogel, La Gazette du bon ton appeared until 1925, with a hiatus from 1915 to 1920 due to the war (the editor-in-chief having been called up for service). It consisted of 69 issues printed in only 2,000 copies each and notably illustrated with 573 color plates and 148 sketches of the models of the great designers. Right from the start, this sumptuous publication “was aimed at bibliophiles and fashionable society,” (Françoise Tétart-Vittu, “La Gazette du bon ton”, in Dictionnaire de la mode, 2016) and was printed on fine vergé paper using a type cut specially for the magazine by Georges Peignot, known as Cochin, later used (in 1946) by Christian Dior. The prints were made using stencils, heightened in colors, some highlighted in gold or palladium. The story began in 1912, when Lucien Vogel, a man of the world involved in fashion (he had already been part of the fashion magazine Femina) decided, with his wife Cosette de Brunhoff – the sister of Jean, creator of Babar – to set up the Gazette du bon ton, subtitled at the time: “Art, fashion, frivolities.” Georges Charensol noted the reasoning of the editor-in-chief: “’In 1910,’ he observed, ‘there was no really artistic fashion magazine, nothing representative of the spirit of the time. My dream was therefore to make a luxury magazine with truly modern artists…I was assured of success, because when it comes to fashion, no country on earth can compete with France.’” (“Un grand éditeur d’art. Lucien Vogel” in Les Nouvelles littéraires, no. 133, May 1925). The magazine was immediately successful, not only in France but also in the United States and Latin America. At first, Vogel put together a team of seven artists: André-Édouard Marty and Pierre Brissaud, followed by Georges Lepape and Dammicourt, as well as eventually his friends from school and the School of Fine Arts, like George Barbier, Bernard Boutet de Monvel and Charles Martin. Other talented people soon came flocking to join the team: Guy Arnoux, Léon Bakst, Benito, Boutet de Monvel, Umberto Brunelleschi, Chas Laborde, Jean-Gabriel Domergue, Raoul Dufy, Édouard Halouze, Alexandre Iacovleff, Jean Émile Laboureur, Charles Loupot, Chalres Martin, Maggie Salcedo. These artist, mostly unknown when Lucien Vogel sought them out, later became emblematic and sought-after artistic figures. It was also they who worked on the advertising drawings for the Gazette. The plates put the spotlight on, and celebrate, dresses by seven designers of the age: Lanvin, Doeuillet, Paquin, Poiret, Worth, Vionnet and Doucet. The designers provided exclusive models for each issue. Nonetheless, some of the illustrations are not based on real models, but simply on the illustrator’s conception of the fashion of the day. The Gazette du bon ton was an important step in the history of fashion. Combining aesthetic demands with the physical whole, it brought together – for the first time – the great talents of the artistic, literary, and fashion worlds; and imposed, through this alchemy, a completely new image of women: slender, independent and daring, which was shared by the new generation of designers, including Coco Chanel, Jean Patou, Marcel Rochas, and so on… Taken over in 1920 by Condé Montrose Nast, the Gazette du bon ton was an important influence on the new layout and aesthetics of that “little dying paper” that Nast had bought a few years earlier: Vogue.SOLD Réf : 55096 Set an alertRead more

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • Dealer
Fixed price
140 GBP

Pierre MOURGUE

Pierre MOURGUE (Gustave BEER) Bouquet de violettes. Manteau du soir, de Beer (pl.69, La Gazette du Bon ton, 1921 n°9) Lucien Vogel éditeur, Paris 1921, 18x24cm, une feuille. Original color print, printed on vergé paper, signed in the plate. An original print used to illustrate the Gazette du bon ton, one of the most attractive and influential 20th century fashion magazines, featuring the talents of French artists and other contributors from the burgeoning Art Deco movement. A celebrated fashion magazine established in 1912 by Lucien Vogel, La Gazette du bon ton appeared until 1925, with a hiatus from 1915 to 1920 due to the war (the editor-in-chief having been called up for service). It consisted of 69 issues printed in only 2,000 copies each and notably illustrated with 573 color plates and 148 sketches of the models of the great designers. Right from the start, this sumptuous publication “was aimed at bibliophiles and fashionable society,” (Françoise Tétart-Vittu, “La Gazette du bon ton”, in Dictionnaire de la mode, 2016) and was printed on fine vergé paper using a type cut specially for the magazine by Georges Peignot, known as Cochin, later used (in 1946) by Christian Dior. The prints were made using stencils, heightened in colors, some highlighted in gold or palladium. The story began in 1912, when Lucien Vogel, a man of the world involved in fashion (he had already been part of the fashion magazine Femina) decided, with his wife Cosette de Brunhoff – the sister of Jean, creator of Babar – to set up the Gazette du bon ton, subtitled at the time: “Art, fashion, frivolities.” Georges Charensol noted the reasoning of the editor-in-chief: “’In 1910,’ he observed, ‘there was no really artistic fashion magazine, nothing representative of the spirit of the time. My dream was therefore to make a luxury magazine with truly modern artists…I was assured of success, because when it comes to fashion, no country on earth can compete with France.’” (“Un grand éditeur d’art. Lucien Vogel” in Les Nouvelles littéraires, no. 133, May 1925). The magazine was immediately successful, not only in France but also in the United States and Latin America. At first, Vogel put together a team of seven artists: André-Édouard Marty and Pierre Brissaud, followed by Georges Lepape and Dammicourt, as well as eventually his friends from school and the School of Fine Arts, like George Barbier, Bernard Boutet de Monvel and Charles Martin. Other talented people soon came flocking to join the team: Guy Arnoux, Léon Bakst, Benito, Boutet de Monvel, Umberto Brunelleschi, Chas Laborde, Jean-Gabriel Domergue, Raoul Dufy, Édouard Halouze, Alexandre Iacovleff, Jean Émile Laboureur, Charles Loupot, Chalres Martin, Maggie Salcedo. These artist, mostly unknown when Lucien Vogel sought them out, later became emblematic and sought-after artistic figures. It was also they who worked on the advertising drawings for the Gazette. The plates put the spotlight on, and celebrate, dresses by seven designers of the age: Lanvin, Doeuillet, Paquin, Poiret, Worth, Vionnet and Doucet. The designers provided exclusive models for each issue. Nonetheless, some of the illustrations are not based on real models, but simply on the illustrator’s conception of the fashion of the day. The Gazette du bon ton was an important step in the history of fashion. Combining aesthetic demands with the physical whole, it brought together – for the first time – the great talents of the artistic, literary, and fashion worlds; and imposed, through this alchemy, a completely new image of women: slender, independent and daring, which was shared by the new generation of designers, including Coco Chanel, Jean Patou, Marcel Rochas, and so on… Taken over in 1920 by Condé Montrose Nast, the Gazette du bon ton was an important influence on the new layout and aesthetics of that “little dying paper” that Nast had bought a few years earlier: Vogue.80 € Réf : 54925 Order BookRead more

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • Dealer
Fixed price
70 GBP

Jean CALVIN & Théodore de BEZE

Jean CALVIN & Théodore de BEZE Ioannis Caluini in viginti prima Ezechielis Prophetae capita Praelectiones, Ioannis Budaei & Caroli Ionuillaei labore & industria exceptae. Com Praefatione Theodori Bazae ad generosis. Gasparem ) Colignio Gallia Amiralium. Ex officina Francisci Perrini , Genevae (Genève) 1565, in-8 (12x19,5cm), (10f.) 412ff. (20f.) Sig : *10 a-z8 A-Z8 Aa-Hh8, relié. CALVIN Jean & BèZE Théodore de Ioannis Caluini in viginti prima Ezechielis Prophetae capita Praelectiones, Ioannis Budaei & Caroli Ionuillaei labore & industria exceptae. Com Praefatione Theodori Bazae ad generosis. Gasparem) Colignio Gallia Amiralium. Ex officina Francisci Perrini , Genevae (Geneva) 1565, in-8 (12 x 19,5 cm), (10 f.) 412 ff (20 f.) Sig: *10 a-z8 A-Z8 Aa-Hh8, mid-19th-century half morocco The very rare posthumous first edition, first printing (known as “type a”), with all the typographical characteristics (capitals in the fifth line of the title in Roman letter, *ii instead of *ij and identical initials on *ii and p.1). This edition contains a preface by Théodore de Bèze, Calvin’s successor, in the form of an exhortation to the head of the Protestants in France, Admiral Gaspard de Coligny. Another edition by the same printer appeared a few months later in French translation. Thirty-four lines per page, woodcut initials, printer’s device. Mid-19th century half navy blue morocco by Galette, spine in six compartments with richly decorated frames, marbled pastedowns and endpapers, all edges red. Two corners slightly rubbed, small repair to upper inside margin of title, a few leaves repaired in margins, occasional marginal dampstaining. Contemporary inscription to title. Calvin began his lessons on Ezekiel on the 20th January 1562. Very soon, however, his state of health compelled him to call upon Théodore de Bèze’s help. In a letter to the Daniel family, François Perrot notes this double teaching: “Our good tutor and common father has got into the habit of commenting on Ezekiel – still in hand – which is to say on the first three days every second week this year, while our Théodore in his turn is commenting on the Catechism in Greek the first three days of the week...Because of his illness, Calvin can often hardly finish his bit.” Calvin interrupted his unfinished lessons once and for all on the 2nd February 1564. These lessons on the first twenty chapters of the revelations of the Prophet Ezekiel are the last preached by Calvin before his death on the 27th May 1564. Like the previous lessons, these too were collected in Latin by Jean Budé and Calvin’s secretary, Charles de Jonviller who, on the 9th October 1564 asked the Council for “permission to have printed the lessons of Monseigneur Calvin on the first 20 chapters of Ezekiel, reviewed by the deceased. Agreed that he has permission for as many as Monseigneur de Bèze has witnessed.” In his dedicatory epistle to Admiral de Coligny, de Bèze – who succeeded Calvin to the Chair of Theology at the Academy – pays elegant homage to his friend and spiritual guide: “In him we find the only [person] in our time who has left behind so many works which contain so whole and so pure a doctrine. But that it had pleased God to leave us the benefit of this shining light for another year or two; it seems to me, in truth, that one could not demand a more perfect knowledge of the Old and New Testaments...His death, of which he was forewarned, prevented his finishing Ezekiel, which is all the greater a loss to the Church, since he was the most obscure of the Prophets, as we know...and who knows when we will find someone to complete this painting, begun by our Apelles.” Only 16 copies in various libraries of the first printing (cf. Bibliotheca Calviniana). A handsome and very rare copy of the first printing with good margins.5 000 € Réf : 44430 Order BookRead more

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • Dealer
Fixed price
4 500 GBP

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