Antique Chinese Porcelain Co.

Countries
  • United Kingdom
Objects "Antique Chinese Porcelain Co."

Famille Verte Kangxi Bowl

This thickly potted and straight-sided deep bowl is painted in the famille verte palette. The exterior decoration is of a collection of scholarly objects and antiquities, positioned either on or close by a table. Whilst this design - similar to the "Hundred Antiques" - is not in itself unusual on porcelain of the kangxi period, the inclusion of a porcelain duck and several figures - as here - is rare. Whilst the inside and outside rim of the bowl are undecorated, the interiors central decoration is of a lozenge shaped panel containing a further group of similar objects. The use of porcelain figures on Chinese ceramics is somewhat limited - although other examples are known. Amongst the objects depicted on the table are the figures of a duck and that of a boy - possibly one of the Twins of Harmony. Although the duck maybe enamel or copper, porcelain examples are known - the most recent discovery being on a censer from the Chengua period - with a Xuande mark. Another cursory reference is in the Dao Shuo - a description of Chinese pottery and porcelain, "...the forms of the pieces are most varied....others again, are moulded in the form of single and double gourds, flowers, fruit and animal forms". Diameter: 21 cm Kangxi (1662-1722) CONDITION The enamels are vibrant and in extremely good condition.There are two small areas of v-shaped restoration to the rim. A number of small rim frits have also been well restored. RELATED EXAMPLE A plate with a similar decoration is illustrated in "The Copeland Collection: Chinese and Japanese Figures" by William R Sargeant, Page 16, Figure 2. A near identical bowl is included in Sotheby & Co " Catalogue of Fine Chinese Export Porcelain" , 6 November 1973, Page 26, Lot 93. Price: £ 3,250 Weight: 1.0 KgRead more

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • Dealer

Pair of Small Kangxi Blue and White Plates

Each plate is decorated with three men and a woman - all in under glaze blue - seated in a boat and below a willow tree. The rim is unusual in that it is painted with the "Three Friends of Winter", pine, bamboo and prunus - the underside with an alternating pattern of mountainous islands. There is an apocryphal six character Chengua mark to the base of each plate. The central decoartion is thought to depict the Ruan brothers - Ruan Xiao'er, Ruan Xiaowu and Ruan Xiaoqi - characters who intially appear in chapter fifteeen of "The Water Margin". All three brothers lived at Stone Tablet, a village near Mount Liang in Jizhou and earned their living by fishing and trading "illegally" on the river. Ruan the Second was the only brother to be married and it maybe that the woman included in the scene is his wife. "The Water Margin" - "Shu Hu Zhuan" is set during the Song Dynasty and tells the story of how a group of one hundred and eight outlaws - one hundred and five men and three women - gathered at the Marshes of Mount Liang, to form a sizeable army before they were eventually granted amnesty by the government and sent on a campaign to supress rebel forces. Diameter: 16 cm Kangxi (1662-1722) CONDITION Both plates have a small chip to the underside of the foot rim of approximately 2 mm in length. One plate also has a small chip to the underside of the rim of approximately the same length. RELATED EXAMPLE For a similar example see "The Collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum", Collection No: c.709-1910 Price: £ 2,000 Weight: 0.3 KgRead more

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • Dealer

Kangxi Famille Verte Plate

This Kangxi dish has a central medallion and panelled sides - all leading to a flat scalloped rim. The main decoration is of elegant peonies, combined with both purple and white magnolia, all growing around a taihu rock. In line with the tradition of Chinese painting - depicting flowers and moving birds - a golden pheasant is the central focus of the design. The border is of flowers on a stipled ground - interupted with six reserves of flying crane. The sides are divided into twelve panels filled with various flowering plants - including hibiscus, crab apple and narcissus - all enclosed by a similar border of reserves containing a number of the "Precious Objects". To the reverse of the dish are four double peony sprays in green and iron-red. The base is inscribed with a "zhi" mark in under glaze blue. This mark, like the apocryphal Chengua mark, has been linked to porcelain made for imperial use - there being several variations of the mark. Whilst more research needs to be undertaken in respect of any direct imperial association - the mark remains associated with wares of a particularly high quality. The grouping of flowers in Chinese Art is not random as in the West but follows strict principles. When two or more flowers are placed together, it is done so either because they grow in the same environment or because their combination suggests a symbolic intent - normally the later. It is bacause of this requirement for symbolism that - as with this dish - a single vine often shows a variety of highly stylised, easily identifiable, flowers. In this way, the white magnolia and peony when combined - as in the central decoration to this dish - have the meaning, "May your noble house be blessed with wealth and honour". Offering the promise of spring, the narcissus is a symbol of good fortune and prosperity - being an important and beloved flower of the Chinese New Year. It is called the "water goddess" or "the goddess who stands above the water". When combined, as here, on the outer border - with rocks and fungus - it has the meaning of "May the immortal fungus congratulate you on your birthday". Diameter: 26 cm Kangxi (1662-1722) PROVENANCE By repute purchased from Bluett, Davis Street, London. Last with Christies South Kensington,London, May 2008. CONDITION The dish is perfect with the enamelling being of extremely high quality. RELATED EXAMPLE An identical example is illustrated in " Chinese Ceramics in the Collection of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam: The Ming and Qing Dynasties ", by Christiaan J.A. Jorg, Page 157, No 171. Price: £8,000Read more

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • Dealer

Large Japanese Kakiemon Vase

This rare and beautifully decorated oviform vase has a slight spreading mouth and short neck. The body of the vase is decorated with three panels - each framed by dense scrollwork and red peony blooms. In each of the three panels - decorated in the kakiemon palette of red, blue, green, yellow and aubergine - stand two figures, one with a parasol and the other with an "urchiwa". Between them is rockwork - with issuing prunus, tall bamboo and a bird perched in the bowing branches. The neck and foot both have under glaze blue lines with alternating flower sprays and geometric designs. The decoration with its chinoserie-like elements might be a Japanese adaption of Chinese kangxi porcelain with "Long Eliza" motifs. It is also quite feasible that such jars contributed to the chinoiserie theme of "La Dame au Parasol" - which echoed throughout European art in both the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. A ceiling painted at Orranienberg near Berlin - the seventeenth century palalce of the Elector of Brandenberg - allegedly included cherubs holding up a vase of similar decoration and others exist in English collections e.g. Blenheim Palace and Woburn Abbey. The jar may also have originally been part of a five-piece garniture. Height: 28 cm Last Quarter 17th Century CONDITION There are several well-restored consolidated cracks to the vase.There is a small area on one panel, which would apear to be where the slip and glaze have not adhered during the firing process. The enamels are good but show slight rubbing at the extremities of the figures. RELATED EXAMPLES An identical decorated but larger vase with a cover is illustrated in "Kakiemon: Porcelain from the English Country House", by Oliver Impey and Mark Hinton, Page 57, No 35. A similat example is illustrated in "Fine & Curious: Japanese Export Porcelain in Dutch Collections", by Christiaan J.A.Jorg, Page 74, No 61. Price: £ 20,000 Weight: 3.3 KgRead more

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • Dealer

Kangxi Famille Verte Stem Cup

The decoration on the bowl is of a scholar -painted in hues of green, aubergine and yellow - surrounded by scrolls and within a rocky fenced landscape. An approaching attendant carries food and close to the scholar is a goose. The bevelled and partially hollow stem is decorated with two of the "Eight Precious Objects" - embellished with ribbons - indicative of magic powers. There is a separate - but later dated - wooden stand. The scholar is thought to be the Chinese calligrapher Wang Xizhi (303-361) who is referred to as the "Sage of Calligraphy". He is considered by many to be one of the most esteemed calligraphers of all time and a master of the running script. He is particularly remembered for his pastime of rearing geese. Legend has it that by observing how geese moved their necks, he developed the ability of turning his wrist whilst writing. The scene on the cup is thought to describe the story of Wang Xizhi's visit to Shaoxing where there was a Daoist monk who had a flock of fine geese. Wang Xizhi was delighted by the geese and as a result wished to buy them - although the monk was reluctant to sell. However after much persuasion the monk relented, agreeing to give Wang Xizhi the flock in exchange for a transcript by him of Laozi's Daodejing, with its commentary by Heshanggong.The monk had already prepared the scrolls in advance but could not find anyone with experience enough to write them. Wang remained for half a day to write out two chapters - both the Dao and De. Later he returned home - with the geese as his reward. Height excluding the stand: 12 cm. Kangxi (1662-1722) PROVENENCE By repute purchased from John Sparks Limited in the 1960's. CONDITION There is a well restored hairline crack to the rim. RELATED EXAMPLE There is a small porcelain cup depicting Wang Xizhi "walking geese" in the China Gallery of the Asian Civilisation Museum in Singapore. Price: £ 6,500 Weight: 0.5 KgRead more

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • Dealer

Kangxi Blue and White Ginger Jar

In brilliant tones of underglaze cobalt blue this ovoid jar is decorated with three "mythical beasts". Each stands on a jagged rock protruding from foaming waves with stylised "flames" emanating from its body, emphasizing its magical abilities. A double line border encircles the short neck, which has been left in the biscuit. The recessed base, with its undercut foot rim, shows a double circle in underglaze blue. Whilst on intial inspection it would be easy to identify the "mythical beast" as a kylin, it is important to remember that it is often confused with the baize - the "Beast of the White Marsh". This mythical animal had the head of a dragon, two horns and the body of a lion, but as like here, with scales only appearing on its shoulders and flanks. This was in contrast to the kylin whose entire body was covered in scales. The kylin also had hooves - whereas here the beast displays claws - once again a characteristic of the baize. This mysterious creature, according to Tang Dynasty mythology, taught Huangdi - The Yellow Emperor (2697-2597 BC) - about the dangerous and malevolent beings inhabiting the world: "Huangdi went on a tour of inspection. In the east he reached the sea and ascended Mount Hang in Hunan Province. At the seashore he encounted "The White Marsh", a divine beast, who could speak in human language and who had extensive knowledge of the nature of all creatures". Mountains were considered especially auspicious when combined with water - referred to as an auspicious blessing - "longevity and good fortune as unlimited as that of the oceans and mountains". Mountains were also generally depicted with three peaks, indicating "The Isles of the Immortals". The Eight Immortals resided in a paradise known as the "Isles of the Blest" in pavillions of silver and gold. This paradise was considered to consist of three or more mountains isolated in the Eastern Sea - Fangzhang, Penlai and Yingzhou - sometimes known collectively as Penglai. Before they became partly ornamental it is thought that these jars were used to store root ginger, which in the eighteenth century was considered to have stimulative digestive properties. Height: 22 cm Kangxi (1662-1722) PROVENANCE From an Englsh Private Collection - last with Geoffrey Waters Oriental Ceramics and Works of Art, London, March 2000. CONDITION There is a short well restoredl hairline crack to the body of the vase. RELATED EXAMPLES A baluster vase with a similar decoration is illustrated in the Avery Bundage Collection: ID:B60P83 A Yen Yen vase with a similar decoration is illustrated in "Chinese Blue & White Porcelain from the Pullan Collection", Page 39, No. 50. Price: £ 5,000 Weight: 2.1 KgRead more

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • Dealer

Kangxi Famille Verte Ginger Jar

This oviform jar with its flat straight-sided cover is decorated with flowering peonies, magnolia and wild crab apple trees, all growing from strangely shaped taihu-rocks. As the decoration on the jar unfolds the pictorial quality - displaying delicate shades and graduations of the famille verte palette - is increased with the addition of a variety of birds and insects. Here the theme of "Flowers and Birds" - popular in Chinese painting since the Song dynasty - achieves a very highly decorative quality. The rocks are outlined by wide dark rims emphasised by strokes encircling light-washed areas. The cover is again decorated in the same fashion as the body - with flowering peonies, magnolia and insects. The base of the jar is glazed. The decorative combination of peonies, magnolia and crab apple blosssom is not only applied because of its beauty but together they also convey the promise of happiness in the form of a rebus - phonetically identical with the meaning in Chinese of " Wealth and high rank in the Jade Hall". This shape of jar is commonly referred to in the West as a ginger jar - the name being derived from the Dutch word " confijt pot ", being a pot for preserves, which was found in the freight lists of Dutch ships from about 1635. Vessels of this type seem to have been particularly popular in Holland because they are depicted in numerous still life paintings of the seventeenth century. Height including cover: 24 cm / Weight: 2.8 Kg Kangxi (1162-1722) CONDITION The body of the jar is perfect and the enamels are vibrant with no sign of rubbing. The cover with damage that has been well restored. RELATED EXAMPLE For a similar example but without a cover see "Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art: Julian Thompson Study Collection", Sothebys London, May 2014, Lot 196. Price: £ 4,250 Weight: 2.8 KgRead more

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • Dealer

Blog posts about "Antique Chinese Porcelain Co."

Realised prices "Antique Chinese Porcelain Co. "

Antique Chinese Porcelain Co. has 57 objects in the categories.

Find address and telephone number to Antique Chinese Porcelain Co.

Advert