Antique Chinese Porcelain Co.

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Objects "Antique Chinese Porcelain Co."

Large Kangxi Famille Verte Shallow Dish

This large but shallow dish has a broad flat scalloped rim, which is pencilled in a " rouge-de-fer " diaper pattern. Contained within the border decoration are eight " Crane Medallions ", interspersed with coloured lappets arranged in pairs. The scene - based on a woodblock print from the play " Romance of the Western Chamber " - is both detailed and delicately painted in bright tones of the famille verte palette. On the reverse, the sides of the dish have undulating panels in relief and are decorated with three camellia flowers of green and iron-red - which are equi-distant from each other. The glazed base shows an artemesia leaf within a double circle. The scene-carefully composed and full of charm and melancholy - depicts the tearful farewell between the two lovers Yang Sheng and Cui Yingying. It is taken from Act Three of the play and is commonly referred to as " Feast with Tears ". At the centre of the scene are the two lovers and positioned around them are the scholar's groom, Cui Yingying's maid, Hong Niang and the sedan chair attendant. The sedan chair itself is depicted with wheel spokes painted in two tones of iron-red - emphaisising the overall detail of the painting. The pine tree to the right and the two lines of flying geese to the left, add both balance and reinforce the romantic and yet melancholy feel of the scene. It is worth noting that eight cranes together - as depicted on the plate - are indicative of the " Eight Immortals " and the granting of longevity. Diameter: 37 cm Kangxi (1662-1722) CONDITION The enamels are nicely executed and subtle in their use. There is a small area of surface scratch to the far left of the pagoda - almost within the cavetto. Some damage to an area of the rim which has been well restored. RELATED EXAMPLES The importance and significance of the " Crane Medallion " dishes are discussed in detail in " Famille Verte: Chinese Porcelain in Green Enamels" by Christiaan J.A.Jorg, Pages 114-117. In particular, reference is given to "...A dish that was offered by Bernheimer London in 1990, also featuring a scene from " The Western Chamber " showing the parting of the student Zhang and Yingying. A different version of the same episode appears in the Musee Ariana in Geneva (inv.no.AR 4327)". Two similar plates are also identified in " Chinese Ceramics from the Gulexuan Collection " by Regina Krahl and Clarissa von Spee, Pages 132-133, No's 101/102. Price: £ 8,000 Weight: 1.5 KgRead more

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Transitional Wucai Baluster Vase and Cover

This rare vase of ovoid form is brightly decorated in red, green, yellow and turquoise over glaze enamels. There are upright lappets rising from both above the foot and below the shoulder - each bordered in yellow, red, and green enamels. The body is decorated with four roundels - reserved against a brocade background - which alternate with Buddhist Emblems - Baijixiang - set below flames encircling the neck. Each roundel - outlined in green and aubergine - contains a single flower representing each of the four seasons. The peony - considered to be the queen of flowers symbolises spring; lotus - sacred flower of Buddhists represents summer; chrysanthemum - emblem of autumn and prunus - symbol of winter, with each of its five petals representing the five races: Chinese, Manchu, Mongol, Mohammadan and Tibetan. When the four flowers are shown together they form a homophone meaning "year round peace". Height with cover: 36 cm Shunzhi (1644-1661) CONDITION There is a well restored crack, which runs across the base of the vase and approximately 5 cm up the body from the base. The enamels are very good and show no sign of rubbing. The lid whilst of the same period as the vase is matched. RELATED EXAMPLE A sleeve vase with a similar decoration can be seen in "An Era of Inspiration:17th Century Chinese Porcelains from the Collection of Julia and John Curtis", Christie's New York, 16 March 2015, Lot 35. Price: £ 5,000 Weight: 4.5 KgRead more

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Kangxi Famille Verte Stem Cup

The decoration on the bowl is of a scholar -painted in hues of green, aubergine and yellow - surrounded by scrolls and within a rocky fenced landscape. An approaching attendant carries food and close to the scholar is a goose. The bevelled and partially hollow stem is decorated with two of the "Eight Precious Objects" - embellished with ribbons - indicative of magic powers. There is a separate - but later dated - wooden stand. The scholar is thought to be the Chinese calligrapher Wang Xizhi (303-361) who is referred to as the "Sage of Calligraphy". He is considered by many to be one of the most esteemed calligraphers of all time and a master of the running script. He is particularly remembered for his pastime of rearing geese. Legend has it that by observing how geese moved their necks, he developed the ability of turning his wrist whilst writing. The scene on the cup is thought to describe the story of Wang Xizhi's visit to Shaoxing where there was a Daoist monk who had a flock of fine geese. Wang Xizhi was delighted by the geese and as a result wished to buy them - although the monk was reluctant to sell. However after much persuasion the monk relented, agreeing to give Wang Xizhi the flock in exchange for a transcript by him of Laozi's Daodejing, with its commentary by Heshanggong.The monk had already prepared the scrolls in advance but could not find anyone with experience enough to write them. Wang remained for half a day to write out two chapters - both the Dao and De. Later he returned home - with the geese as his reward. Height excluding the stand: 12 cm. Kangxi (1662-1722) PROVENENCE By repute purchased from John Sparks Limited in the 1960's. CONDITION There is a well restored hairline crack to the rim. RELATED EXAMPLE There is a small porcelain cup depicting Wang Xizhi "walking geese" in the China Gallery of the Asian Civilisation Museum in Singapore. Price: £ 6,500 Weight: 0.5 KgRead more

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Kangxi Famille Verte Conical Bowl

This bowl is both extremely rare and unusual in shape - with wide flaring sides which rise from a short tapered foot to an everted rim. The exterior is decorated in bright over glaze enamels and depicts two scenes, both of which are taken from the story of the "Romance of the Western Chamber". One illustration is set at night - the inference being drawn from the inclusion into the scene of both the moon and a star constellation and represents the episode in which Zhang Sheng meets Cui Yingying after climbing a wall of the Salvation Monastery - the maid Hong Niang is shown standing to one side. The second scene is thought to be that of Zhang Sheng and his boy attendant, both resting at an inn on their way to the capital, where Zhang Sheng is set to take the highest level of imperial examinations. The inside of the rim is decorated with the “Eight Buddhist Symbols” and the central medallion depicts the "Three Friends of Winter”. In the center of the glazed base is an apocryphal Xuande reign mark within a double circle. Diameter: 20cm Kangxi (1662-1722) CONDITION There are four sealed hairline cracks all of which originate at the flared rim of the bowl. There is also a small area of rim restoration of approximately 1.5 cm to the area above the boy attendant. A fire fault originates at the foot rim and is of approximately 1 cm in length. RELATED EXAMPLES For similar scenes from the story of the "Romance of the Western Chamber" see "Famille Verte: Chinese Porcelain in Green Enamels" by Christiaan J.A. Jorg, Pages 100-101, No 94, Scenes 16 and 23. Price: £ 6,250 Weight: 0.3 KgRead more

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Kangxi Famille Verte Ginger Jar

This oviform jar with its flat straight-sided cover is decorated with flowering peonies, magnolia and wild crab apple trees, all growing from strangely shaped taihu-rocks. As the decoration on the jar unfolds the pictorial quality - displaying delicate shades and graduations of the famille verte palette - is increased with the addition of a variety of birds and insects. Here the theme of "Flowers and Birds" - popular in Chinese painting since the Song dynasty - achieves a very highly decorative quality. The rocks are outlined by wide dark rims emphasised by strokes encircling light-washed areas. The cover is again decorated in the same fashion as the body - with flowering peonies, magnolia and insects. The base of the jar is glazed. The decorative combination of peonies, magnolia and crab apple blosssom is not only applied because of its beauty but together they also convey the promise of happiness in the form of a rebus - phonetically identical with the meaning in Chinese of " Wealth and high rank in the Jade Hall". This shape of jar is commonly referred to in the West as a ginger jar - the name being derived from the Dutch word " confijt pot ", being a pot for preserves, which was found in the freight lists of Dutch ships from about 1635. Vessels of this type seem to have been particularly popular in Holland because they are depicted in numerous still life paintings of the seventeenth century. Height including cover: 24 cm / Weight: 2.8 Kg Kangxi (1162-1722) CONDITION The body of the jar is perfect and the enamels are vibrant with no sign of rubbing. The cover with damage that has been well restored. RELATED EXAMPLE For a similar example but without a cover see "Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art: Julian Thompson Study Collection", Sothebys London, May 2014, Lot 196. Price: £ 4,250 Weight: 2.8 KgRead more

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Transitional Wucai Baluster Vase and Cover

This vase is bulbous with a short neck and slightly rounded lip. It is thickly potted and with the exception of the base, covered in a colourless glaze. The decoration combines green, iron-red, yellow and aubergine over glaze enamels with under glaze blue. The body of the vase is decorated with two powerful four-clawed dragons - one in yellow and the other in green. The large curved bodies of the dragons are ascending from waves, which break against large blue rocks. Freely painted red flame-like lines fill the space between the dragons and clouds - adding much fluidity to the design. The shoulder has a "stone wall" border. In Chinese mythology the dragon is considered to be a benevolent creature - rising from the waves of the Spring Equinox to bring the rains necessary for the harvest. In the same way dragons surrounded by red clouds evoke the tradition of clouds as a good omen. Some of the clouds shown on this vase are of the four-tailed type, emphasised in blue and green and consisting of ruyi-shaped elements - combining the positive notion of wishes for both blessings and a long life. Height with cover: 40 cm Shunzhi (1644-1661) PROVENANCE From an English Private Collection - last with Guest & Gray, London, September 2004. CONDITION There is a well restored semi-circular crack to the body of the vase. RELATED EXAMPLE An identical example can be seen in "An Era of Inspiration: 17th Century Chinese Porcelain from the Collection of Julia and John Curtis", Christies New York, 16 March 2015, Lot 3541. A near identical example but without a cover, can be seen in " Chinese Export Porcelain: From the Museum of Anastacio Goncalves Lisbon" by Maria Antonia Pinto de Matos, Page 160, No 80. A similar vase is also illustrated by Eva Strober in "Symbols of Chinese Porcelain", No 7 and in "S Marchant and Sons: Exhibition of Transitional Wares for the Japanese and Domestic Markets", Page 62, No 108. Price: £ 5,000 Weight: 4.3 KgRead more

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Famille Verte Kangxi Bowl

This thickly potted and straight-sided deep bowl is painted in the famille verte palette. The exterior decoration is of a collection of scholarly objects and antiquities, positioned either on or close by a table. Whilst this design - similar to the "Hundred Antiques" - is not in itself unusual on porcelain of the kangxi period, the inclusion of a porcelain duck and several figures - as here - is rare. Whilst the inside and outside rim of the bowl are undecorated, the interiors central decoration is of a lozenge shaped panel containing a further group of similar objects. The use of porcelain figures on Chinese ceramics is somewhat limited - although other examples are known. Amongst the objects depicted on the table are the figures of a duck and that of a boy - possibly one of the Twins of Harmony. Although the duck maybe enamel or copper, porcelain examples are known - the most recent discovery being on a censer from the Chengua period - with a Xuande mark. Another cursory reference is in the Dao Shuo - a description of Chinese pottery and porcelain, "...the forms of the pieces are most varied....others again, are moulded in the form of single and double gourds, flowers, fruit and animal forms". Diameter: 21 cm Kangxi (1662-1722) CONDITION The enamels are vibrant and in extremely good condition.There are two small areas of v-shaped restoration to the rim. A number of small rim frits have also been well restored. RELATED EXAMPLE A plate with a similar decoration is illustrated in "The Copeland Collection: Chinese and Japanese Figures" by William R Sargeant, Page 16, Figure 2. A near identical bowl is included in Sotheby & Co " Catalogue of Fine Chinese Export Porcelain" , 6 November 1973, Page 26, Lot 93. Price: £ 3,250 Weight: 1.0 KgRead more

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