Antique Chinese Porcelain Co.

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Objects "Antique Chinese Porcelain Co."

Transitional Wucai Baluster Vase and Cover

This baluster vase has a rounded lip and short straight neck - painted in a frieze of iron-red peonies, yellow chrysanthemums and dark green leaves. The body - divided into horizontal zones - is heavily decorated in under glaze blue with dark green, iron-red and yellow over glaze enamels. The shoulder displays interlocking red peonies with yellow chrysanthemums, whilst the section nearest to the base is again decorated with peonies in enamels of iron-red and dark green. The design to the mid-section of the vase is of four vertical double strands with a selection of items from the "Eight Precious Things" - in iron-red and green - with fluttering ribbon streamers to enhance their importance and power. However, because the objects are so highly stylised, some of the symbols are difficult to identify and lead to an element of confusion, possibly caused through the painter having allowed for an element of flexibility in the design between the 'Eight Buddhist Symbols" and the "Eight Precious Objects". Alternating with the double strands are highly decorative circles - again enhanced by ribbons. Height with cover: 36 cm Chongzhen (1628-1644) PROVENANCE Baroness Burdett-Coutts and thence by descent. Last with Duke's The Dorchester Fine Art Saleroom, February 2008. Angela Georgina Burdett-Coutts (1814-1906) was the granddaughter of Thomas Coutts who on the death of her step - grandmother inherited a significant fortune. However, due to nineteenth century convention she was forbidden from involvement in Coutts Bank and as a result channelled her energies into philanthropy - spending the majority of her wealth on scholarships and endowments. In 1871, in recognition of her work, Queen Victoria conferred on her a "sue jure" peerage as Boronesss Coutts of Highgate and Brookfield. CONDITION There is a sealed hairline crack which runs from the rim of the neck to the shoulder. The enamels are exremely vibrant and show no sign of rubbing. RELATED EXAMPLES A bowl with a similar decoration is illustrated in "Rare Marks in Chinese Ceramics: A joint exhibition from the Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art and the Victoria and Albert Museum", by Ming Wilson, Page 152, No 66. Price: £ 7,500 Weight: 3.4 KgRead more

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Japanese Arita Blue and White Dish

This finely painted saucer dish has eight painted lobes and a brown glazed petal rim. It is vigorously painted in underglaze blue with a river scene, including a rocky bank with blossoming prunus, bamboo and rose bushes. To the left, a striding tiger faces a grinning dragon, whose head and tail are emerging from clouds to the right. The underside is decorated with a scroll of pending karakusa and on the base there are six spur marks surrounding a square fuku mark in seal script. The tiger was extremely popular in Europe and was copied extensively on porcelain. The tiger is not indigenous to Japan and was a motif originally taken from China and Korea - possibly only reaching Japan in paintings. The motif of the tiger facing a dragon is thought to represent "Heaven and Earth". As with all kakiemon under glaze blue pieces this dish has an ordinary Arita body. Diameter: 30.5 cm Last Quarter of 17th century CONDITION There is a small area of restoration to the rim and a short sealed hairline crack. RELATED EXAMPLES An identical example is illustrated in "Fine and Curious: Japanese Export Porcelain in Dutch Collections", by Christiaan J.A.Jorg, Page 145, No 159. A similar example is illustrated in "Porcelain for Palaces: The Fashion for Japan in Europe 1650-1750", by John Ayers, Oliver Impey and J.V.G Mallet, Page 154, No 126. Price: £ 5,000 Weight: 1.0 KgRead more

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Transitional Wucai Slender Baluster Vase

This slender vase is decorated in under glaze blue and over glaze enamels of green, red, yellow and black. The scene shows a group of female figures standing on a terrace, which is surrounded by balustrades and ornamental rocks. On the shoulder there is a "cracked-ice" border with peony sprays on the everted trumpet neck. The base is unglazed with concentric grooves. The scene is considered to be an episode from the tragedy of Yang Guifei (719-756), who was the favourite concubine of the Tang emperor Ming Hueng (685-762) - she was his daughter-in-law with whom he fell passionately in love and later married. However, she became the victim of political intrigue and together with her cousin Yang Guozhong, was accused of having provoked the Anshi Rebellion. The revolt was a turning point in Chinese history, from which the Tang Dynasty never fully recovered. She is often portrayed with peonies, as she is said to have loved them so much that she asked the gods to allow them to bloom throughout the year. Height: 38 cm Shunzhi (1644-1661) PROVENANCE From an English Private Collection - last with Wooley & Wallis Salisbury Salerooms, July 2005. CONDITION There is a small well repaired area of restoration to the neck - accompanied by associated overspray. RELATED EXAMPLE For a vase of similar shape - with a less everted neck - depicting a scene from " The Tang Emperor visits the Moon Palace" see " Shunzhi Porcelain, Treasures from an Unknown Reign" by Michael Butler, Julia B Curtiss and Stephen Little, Page 206, No 64. Price: £ 8,500 Weight: 3.2 KgRead more

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Kangxi Famille Verte Plate

This Kangxi dish has a central medallion and panelled sides - all leading to a flat scalloped rim. The main decoration is of elegant peonies, combined with both purple and white magnolia, all growing around a taihu rock. In line with the tradition of Chinese painting - depicting flowers and moving birds - a golden pheasant is the central focus of the design. The border is of flowers on a stipled ground - interupted with six reserves of flying crane. The sides are divided into twelve panels filled with various flowering plants - including hibiscus, crab apple and narcissus - all enclosed by a similar border of reserves containing a number of the "Precious Objects". To the reverse of the dish are four double peony sprays in green and iron-red. The base is inscribed with a "zhi" mark in under glaze blue. This mark, like the apocryphal Chengua mark, has been linked to porcelain made for imperial use - there being several variations of the mark. Whilst more research needs to be undertaken in respect of any direct imperial association - the mark remains associated with wares of a particularly high quality. The grouping of flowers in Chinese Art is not random as in the West but follows strict principles. When two or more flowers are placed together, it is done so either because they grow in the same environment or because their combination suggests a symbolic intent - normally the later. It is bacause of this requirement for symbolism that - as with this dish - a single vine often shows a variety of highly stylised, easily identifiable, flowers. In this way, the white magnolia and peony when combined - as in the central decoration to this dish - have the meaning, "May your noble house be blessed with wealth and honour". Offering the promise of spring, the narcissus is a symbol of good fortune and prosperity - being an important and beloved flower of the Chinese New Year. It is called the "water goddess" or "the goddess who stands above the water". When combined, as here, on the outer border - with rocks and fungus - it has the meaning of "May the immortal fungus congratulate you on your birthday". Diameter: 26 cm Kangxi (1662-1722) PROVENANCE By repute purchased from Bluett, Davis Street, London. Last with Christies South Kensington,London, May 2008. CONDITION The dish is perfect with the enamelling being of extremely high quality. RELATED EXAMPLE An identical example is illustrated in " Chinese Ceramics in the Collection of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam: The Ming and Qing Dynasties ", by Christiaan J.A. Jorg, Page 157, No 171. Price: £8,000Read more

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Japanese Kakiemon Vase

This rare oviform vase is strikingly decorated with a continuous river scene - occupying almost the entire surface of its body. The landscape is sketchy - with limited indications of a rocky promontory, a boat and pavillion - in thick enamels of red, blue, turquoise and yellow. The neck, shoulder and lower portion of the jar is of an uncomplicated design - limited to simple lines and bands of colour. The handling of the enamels is carefully composed for effect and it is this treatment that is thought to place the vase amongst the earliest decorated in over glaze enamels. Vases with these enamel colours, referred to as the "early enamel groups", form part of the first polychrome export goods manufactured in Arita. They are decorated in a wide variety of motifs and representations and the way in which they are divided into panels, as well as landscape elements, make them redolent of Chinese examples. Height: 23 cm Date: 1660-1670 CONDITION There is a small chip to the inside of the rim and an area of glaze crackle on one side of the body. RELATED EXAMPLES An identical example is illustrated in " City Art Museum of Saint Louis: 200 Years of Japanese Porcelain", by Richard S. Cleveland, Page 93, No 80. Similar examples are illustrated in "Fine and Curious: Japanese Export Porcelain in Dutch Collections", by Christiaan J.A.Jorg, Page 60, No 44 and "Japanese export porcelain: Catalogue of the collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford", by Oliver Impey, Page 70, No 51. Price: £ 11,000 Weight: 1.5 KgRead more

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Transitional Wucai Baluster Vase and Cover

This rare vase of ovoid form is brightly decorated in red, green, yellow and turquoise over glaze enamels. There are upright lappets rising from both above the foot and below the shoulder - each bordered in yellow, red, and green enamels. The body is decorated with four roundels - reserved against a brocade background - which alternate with Buddhist Emblems - Baijixiang - set below flames encircling the neck. Each roundel - outlined in green and aubergine - contains a single flower representing each of the four seasons. The peony - considered to be the queen of flowers symbolises spring; lotus - sacred flower of Buddhists represents summer; chrysanthemum - emblem of autumn and prunus - symbol of winter, with each of its five petals representing the five races: Chinese, Manchu, Mongol, Mohammadan and Tibetan. When the four flowers are shown together they form a homophone meaning "year round peace". Height with cover: 36 cm Shunzhi (1644-1661) CONDITION There is a well restored crack, which runs across the base of the vase and approximately 5 cm up the body from the base. The enamels are very good and show no sign of rubbing. The lid whilst of the same period as the vase is matched. RELATED EXAMPLE A sleeve vase with a similar decoration can be seen in "An Era of Inspiration:17th Century Chinese Porcelains from the Collection of Julia and John Curtis", Christie's New York, 16 March 2015, Lot 35. Price: £ 5,000 Weight: 4.5 KgRead more

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