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Objects "University Archives"

An unusual letter from a Texas Confederate soldier/master to his slaves

Texas - An unusual letter from a Texas Confederate soldier/master to his slaves detailing his expectations while away at war Two page letter, heavily scripted on both sides, 6" x 7.5". Expected folds with small pinhole loss to paper. Age toned with one small burn mark. A superb letter evoking numerous dichotomies of the period. The letter was written by Allen Cameron, who at the time of the letter was in the 18th Texas Infantry as a confederate soldier. As he served in the Texas infantry for only two years (in 1862 and 1863) this allows for the dating of the letter. In his letter, he was reaching out to his farm back home, his family, and the "negros" who worked the farm. A curious letter, because at the same time Cameron was fighting in the civil war to maintain the institution of slavery, he was writing home with the wishes noted in his postscript that the letter be read to the "negros" on his farm, and addressed them in less than the expected draconian communication one usually sees between Master and Slave. The letter comes across as grateful for their efforts, and champions them with the resolution to make a good crop, "I know you can make a good crop for it will grow if you will plant it + work it."The letter also speaks of gratitude that they would choose freely to "moving (back) home ‰Û_ and set out with a resolution to make a crop."The letter certainly leaves the reader with questions about the nature of the relationship between Cameron as a confederate soldier and the "negros" who worked on his farm, and perhaps he was one of the few share croppers of that period, a conjecture which can be supported by his comments, including his final note "I am so glad you are all at home and set out with a resolution to make a crop. I just know you can do it at that place and not work hard." His letter also describes the difficult life of a soldier, perhaps attempting to elicit compassion from his family and workers, and his expressed desire for everyone in the home to work together towards a unified goal. The letter in part: To Nelson, Emelina, Tylor + Perry "You must not think I have forgotten you all. I think of you all and home everyday ‰Û_ I had much rather be there at work everyday ‰Û_ then to be walking all day in the mud and sleeping on the cold ground every night. It know here any time it (illegible) up almost and is very cold. I travel all day from day light until evening and eat cold bread + meat that I carry in my sack ‰Û_ and have not slept in a house but few times since I left home. This is a hard life but perhaps it will be better times after a while I won't (illegible) home sometime this year and eat some pears, + beans + turkies and some fat pigs and Irish potatoes ‰Û_ If a cow gets unruly help Emeline - watch and wherever you see anything getting out of (illegible) stop and fix it at once ‰Û_ Keep the well cleaned out ‰Û_ keep the ditch cleaned out through the new ground so it will carry the water. Always consult your Miss Ann when there is any thing of importance to do and I know you can make a good crop for it will grow if you will plant it + work it. Emeline it (illegible) upon you to take care of the kitchen furniture ‰Û_ assist you miss Ann in everything that she wishes, always consult her about everything that is to be done - and above all you + Nelson, I want you to be kind and obedient to your Miss Ann - and always consult her about all work to be done and work together and you will get along so much better at home any where else I was afraid when your Miss talked of moving home that you would not be willing. But I am so glad you are all at home and set out with a resolution to make a crop. I just know you can do it at that place and not work hard. I expect to live mighty well when I come home I want some butter milk + beans. Allen A. Cameron I wrote the above to (illegible) the negros you can read it to them" A most unusual and thought provoking letter of the period.Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

Obama's stepmother, Ruth, writes from Kenya to his father in Cambridge, Mass

Obama Barack 1961 - Barack Obama's stepmother, his father's wife Ruth, writes from Kenya to his father in Cambridge, Massachusetts Typed Letter Signed "Ruth and / Okoth, Opiyo, Bobby, Rita, Ogosa" by Ruth, on both sides of a pictorial aerogramme air letter sheet, 6" x 12" when opened, 70c Kenya postage stamp affixed, postmarked Nairobi, Kenya, January 4, 1972. Addressed to "Mr. Barack H. Obama / c/o Omar Obama / 17 Perry Street / Cambridge, Massachusetts / United States of America." Return address: "Mrs. Ruth B. Obama / P.O. Box 30265 / Nairobi, Kenya, East Africa." Very good condition. Barack Obama met his father, Barack Obama, Sr. just once, when he was 10-years-old, in Honolulu at Christmastime, 1971, just two weeks before this letter was written. Barack Sr. had attended Harvard University in Cambridge for a doctoral program in economics, but left with a master's degree. At Harvard he started dating Ruth Baker. She went with him to Kenya in 1964, married on December 24, 1964, and had two sons, Mark Okoth Obama and David Opiyo Obama. The couple separated in 1971 and divorced in 1973. In part, "Haven't heard from you in ages - perhaps you have forgotten us? Anyway, one piece of good news has come along: Bobby was accepted to Lenana School - but I don't have the details yet ‰Û_ Also Okoth started Kilimani yesterday and says that the teacher is 'slow'. I told him it is too early to judge (he is a bit impatient already because he knows 'sums' and the others don't) ‰Û_ Both Bobby and Rita were quite ill with malaria towards the end of and at the their stay in Alego and upon returning to Nairobi, however it has now mostly cleared up (I hope). They say all are well at Alego except that Sarah, your sister, is ill with some sort of blood disease which causes her to faint every so often ‰Û_ Ogosa seems to be doing well at his job - I think he is fairly hardworking ‰Û_ My parents seem definitely to be coming at the beginning of February and I have made a booking for them at The Fairview Hotel for the first two weeks in February ‰Û_ We haven't received the suitcase from HongKong yet - I really hope it is not 'lost' in the mail ‰Û_ Meanwhile, I hope you are doing well - and that you are managing satisfactorily‰Û_"Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

Rare Third Bill of Exchange signed by Declaration Signer Francis Hopkinson

Hopkinson Francis 1737 - 1790 Extremely Rare and attractive hi-value Delaware Continental Loan Office Third Bill of Exchange signed by Signer of the Declaration of Independence Francis Hopkinson and issued to General Samuel Patterson of the famous "Flying Camp" Partly Printed Document Signed "F. Hopkinson" as Treasurer of Loans, 1 page, 8.25" x 4.5". United States of America, September 25, 1779. Third Bill of Exchange. Watermarked "UNITED STATES 3" across the center. Countersigned "Saml Patterson" as Commissioner of the Continental Loan-Office in the State of Delaware. Completed in manuscript. To the Commissioner or Commissioners of the United States of America, at Paris. Lightweight watermarked laid paper. Endorsed on verso "Hugh Means." Show-through and tiny holes at right edge. Slight tears at upper and lower edges, old paper strip affixed on verso. Good condition. Patterson was a Captain in the French and Indian War. In the American Revolution, he was member of Boston Relief Committee, colonel of Delaware battalion of the famous "Flying Camp," Brigadier General of the Delaware militia, and first treasurer of the State of Delaware. After the British evacuation of Boston in March 1776, General George Washington met with members of the Continental Congress to determine future military strategy. Faced with defending a huge amount of territory from potential British operations, Washington recommended forming a "Flying Camp", which in the military terminology of the day referred to a mobile, strategic reserve of troops. Congress agreed and on June 3, 1776, passed a resolution "that a flying camp be immediately established in the middle colonies and that it consist of 10,000 men ...." The men recruited for the Flying Camp were to be militiamen from three colonies: including 600 from Delaware. They were to serve until December 1, 1776, unless discharged sooner by Congress, and to be paid and fed in the same manner as regular soldiers of the Continental Army "Exch. for 500 Dollars, at five Livres Tournois p Dollars Numb. 568 ‰Û_ At Thirty Days Sight of this Third Bill, First, Second and Fourth not paid, pay to Mr Hugh Means or Order, Three Hundred Dollars, in Fifteen Hundred Livres Tournois, for Interest due on Money borrowed by the United States‰Û_" On July 27, 1778, Francis Hopkinson was elected by Congress as Commissioner of Loans. Four signed Bills of Exchange were sent across the Atlantic. If the first bill was received, it was valid and used. However, many bills were lost or captured, especially during the Revolutionary War. As soon as one of the bills was exchanged in Paris, the other three lost all value.Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

Captain Eleazir Robbins' copy of important news just after the Battle of Bunker

Bunker Hill Battle of 1775 - Captain Eleazir Robbins' copy of important news just after the Battle of Bunker Hill, including England's promise to "...finish the War at once by reducing with a military force the provinces of New England to obedience." Robbins commanded one of nine companies that left Stoughton, Massachusetts on April 19, 1775, in response to the call to arms after the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Newspaper, 4 pages, 10" x 15", printed at Harvard College for the period September 14 - September 21, 1775. Volume VIII, Number 373, belonging to Captain Eleazir Robbins and very likely signed by him on the first page above the headline. There is much content naming many of the important generals of the war, and activities in London, Lexington and Concord, Boston, Philadelphia, and at Fort Ticonderoga. Small loss at folds and two tears repaired with archival tape, else toned and lightly soiled. Just about very good condition. According to Jack Authelet, author of Foxborough: gem of Norfolk County, "Paul Revere and William Dawes spread the alarm. The British were marching to seize the stores of powder held at Lexington and Concord. Word spread quickly through the territory, and the Minute Men marched in response to the alarm. Captains Josiah Pratt and Eleazer (sic) Robbins of Stoughton (which included the present East Foxborough) commanded two of the nine companies that left Stoughton on April 19, 1775, in response to the call to arms...These officers were leading more than militia companies. They were leading friends, the sons of their neighbors, other family members, and people they saw every Sunday at worship, giving them a heightened sense of responsibility for their troops."Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

Wonderful 1652 King Charles I period booklet

Charles I of England King 1600 - 1649 Wonderful 1652 Charles I period booklet on "The Exposing to Sale, Hereditaments belonging to the King, Queen of Prince of England" An Act For The Exposing to Sale divers Castles, Houses, Parks, Lands and Hereditaments belonging to the King, Queen or Prince, London. Printed by John Field, Printer to the Parliament of England, 1652. 6.25" x 10", Stitched binding, 10 pages with front soft wrap. Overall toned and faintly grubby with light handling marks. Professional paper strengthening and repair to outer page edges in the margins, not affecting text. Provenance: Ex-Sotheby's 1964, to Samuel Moss. Then by descent to Kathryn Moss. This booklet was printed just a few years after the beheading of King Charles I, at the climax of the English Civil War. Parliament of Scotland proclaimed Charles II King on February 5, 1649, with England being declared a Commonwealth in 1649 and ruled as a de facto republic. Cromwell had defeated Charles II at the Battle of Worcester in 1651, and Charles fled to mainland Europe. Cromwell became virtual dictator of England, Scotland and Ireland, and Charles spent the next nine years in exile in France. This booklet was printed the following year and determined An Act for The Exposing to Sale divers Castles, Houses, Parks, Lands and Hereditaments belonging the King, Queen of Prince excepted from Sale by a former Act. Scarce. Beautifully printed and in overall great condition.Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

Spectacular Mary Todd Lincoln signed embossed leather portfolio

Lincoln Mary 1818 - 1882 Spectacular Mary Todd Lincoln signed embossed leather portfolio A deep chocolate brown leather correspondence folder signed and inscribed by Mary Todd Lincoln to her Henry Fowler as "Presented to Henry S. Fowler by his friend / Mrs A. Lincoln/ Chicago / June 14th 1867." Embossed in a diamond grid with gilt ruling. Ornate polished steel escutcheon with what appears to be Florentine gilt accents. 9.75" x 7.25". Interior with damask accordion pockets, and note paper. Gilt tilts to the pockets written in French. Beautiful condition with just a slight bit of rubbing and staining to pocket interior. A very personal artifact of Mary Todd Lincoln, who spoke fluent French, and collected all things French. This piece was gifted shortly after her moving out of The White House when she had relocated to Chicago and there began her effort to settle her husband's estate (she was deeply traumatized by her husband's murder, and did not move out of the White House until May 23, 1865). She had gifted the folder in 1867 to Henry L Fowler who had been a childhood playmate of her son Tad Lincoln. Tad was quite rambunctious as a child in the White House, having been known to play pranks around the Executive Mansion. In the White House Tad sprayed dignitaries with the fire hose, broke mirrors, locked doors, interrupted Cabinet meetings, constructed wagons and sleds out of chairs, set up a food shop in the lobby, rang the call bells, and drilled the servants, as if they were soldiers. Abraham generally laughed at his sons' tricks, and any kind of discipline was generally lacking. By 1868, she wished to further Tad's schooling and education and had moved to Germany to enroll Tad into a boarding school. They remained there for about 3 years, and then in 1871 decided to return to the States. During the ocean voyage home, at the young age of 18, Tad Lincoln fell ill. He never fully recovered from his illness and died several months later most likely of Tuberculosis. This is a part of a group of Mary Todd Lincoln items that descended in the family of a Mrs. Fowler of Chicago, a neighbor and friend of Mary Todd (with Henry being their son). A copy of a partial 20th century inventory and Letter of Provenance accompanies the lot.Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

Parts of Zeppelin along with large print signed by Margaret Bourke White

Bourke-White Margaret 1906 - 1971 Spectacular and very large silver gelatin print of the Zeppelin Airship Akronbeing eased from its hangar on its maiden launch, signed in the lower right corner by photographer Margaret Bourke-White, framed in original bolted "Duralumin," the same material used in the girder construction of theAkronby the Goodyear Zeppelin Corporation Margaret Bourke-White Signed Photograph, Zeppelin Airship Akron. No place: 1931. Large folio, 23" x 17.5", original silver gelatin print, original "Duralumin" frame; entire piece measures 26" x 20". A few small smudges and discolorations to print, particularly along lower edge, just touching signature but not affecting overall appearance of image; original frame fine. A handsome piece. Called "one of the world's great artists" by Alfred Stieglitz, Margaret Bourke-White "epitomized the dynamic spirit of her age‰Û_ covering the most important events of the mid-century" (McDarrah, 52). A photographer at Fortune and Time, Bourke-White was "one of the first photojournalists who told a news story in pictures and also wrote the text" (New York Times), and as a Life staff photographer, she became "of the most successful women in America" (Parr & Badger I:140). During the early years of the Depression, Goodyear was one of Bourke-White's most important clients. She made this image of the airship Akron when it was removed from its hangar for the first time. The Akron was a helium-filled airship of the U.S. Navy which operated between September 1931 and April 1933. She was the world's first flying aircraft carrier, carrying F9C Sparrowhawk fighter planes which could be launched from and recovered by the airship while in flight. The Akron still holds the world record for largest helium-filled airship (the slightly larger Hindenburg and Graf Zeppelin II were filled with hydrogen). The April 4, 1933 crash of the Akron into the sea during heavy weather, which resulted in the loss of 73 crew and passengers (only three men survived)‰ÛÓthe largest loss of life in any airship crash‰ÛÓspelled the end of the rigid airship program in the U.S. Navy, especially since one of the leading proponents of the airship program, Rear Admiral William Moffett, was aboard and died in the accident. The engraved inscription on the original frame reads: "Winner/ C. Poley/ Third Annual Goodyear Dealers Zeppelin Race July-August 1931. This frame is made of Duralumin used in girder construction of the United States Airship 'Akron' built by the Goodyear Zeppelin Corporation." Duralumin was the trade name of a very lightweight aluminum-copper alloy.Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

Signed

Schulz Charles 1922 - 2000 Signed "He's Your Dog, Charlie Brown" LP record album cover picturing Snoopy as the World War I Flying Ace - record included. LP Record Album Cover Signed "For Ron - / Charles M. / Schulz." "Charlie Brown Records / Presents / ‰Û÷He's Your Dog, / Charlie Brown' / by Charles M. Schulz," 12.25" x 12.25". Record included. On the cover, Snoopy is depicted as the World War I Flying Ace zooming through the skies on his flying vehicle, actually, the roof of his doghouse. "Inside / 12-Page Full-Color / Read-Along Book." Minor flaws, worn at edges. Boldly inscribed and signed in black marker. Near fine condition. The television special, "He's Your Dog, Charlie Brown," was televised on CBS on February 14, 1968. It was nominated for the 1968 Emmy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Children's Programming. Published in 1978, the LP's gatefold cover measures 12.25" by 12.25" and opens up like a book. When open, the left side is a record sleeve containing the LP 33 1/3 rpm album. It is also the first page of a 12 page, fully illustrated in color, read-along book, "He's Your Dog, Charlie Brown," stapled together, with the last page of the book affixed to the verso of the back cover. The centerfold, pages 6-9, are loose. In "He's Your Dog, Charlie Brown," a suddenly disobedient Snoopy is sent to the Daisy Hill Puppy Farm for a refresher course in obedience. Charlie Brown phones Peppermint Patty who agrees to let Snoopy spend the night at her house because it's a long walk to Daisy Hill. A week later, Snoopy is still there, spending most of the time by the swimming pool, sipping root beer. After the Daisy Hill Puppy Farm calls Charlie Brown, telling him Snoopy never showed up, Charlie calls Peppermint Patty and finds out Snoopy is still there‰Û_Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

1698 sale of land in lower Manhattan abutting property owned by William Beekman

New York Early - 1698 sale of land in lower Manhattan abutting property owned by William Beekman, for whom William Street and Beekman Street are named Manuscript Document Signed, "Vanderclyff", 1p, parchment, 14.25" x 14.25", New York, October 4, 1698. Remarkably well preserved. Toned, marginal wear, small loss at two fold intersections, else very good condition with original wax seal. Deed for the sale of land in lower Manhattan "for twenty five pounds Currant money of New York," from the widow of Derick Vanderclyff to George Stanton, that being a tract of land "bounded on the South by...commonly called Nassau Street...and on the North by the land of William Beakman (Wilhelmus Beekman)". Docketing on the verso reads in part, "A Deed for A Lott next [to] / The Brewhauss." Beekman purchased his first parcel of land in lower Manhattan in 1652 followed by other parcels in the same area. Although a good deal of it was swampy and scarcely fit for grazing, it became the basis for the family's wealth. "Beekman's Swamp" housed tanneries, from which a trade in leather developed. Beekman was active in politics, an Alderman, one of the two Commissioners to build the wall extending along the present Wall Street, a Schepen, Lieutenant of the Burgher corps, and Deputy Mayor of New York (1681-1683). William Street and Beekman Street in New York City are named in his honor.Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

Large Archive of letters & signed photo re: David Ben-Gurion 1920s-1972

Ben-Gurion David 1886 - 1973 A Life in Letters: a signed photograph, 9 Autograph Letters Signed, 18 Typed Letters Signed, all with exceptional content, signed 1920s Histadrut Teachers' Union Membership Registrar, and 1948 Independence issues of "Ha'aretz" and "The Palestine Post." Comprises: 1. Photograph Signed in English. B&w 7.75" x 9.75" 2. A teacher's Histadrut Membership Registrar signed in the 1920s by BG as Secretary General of Histadrut. 3. "Today you join the company of good teachers ‰Û_ establish generations of achievers, people of ideals and action, who in their hands is the fate of the State and its future‰Û_" nd 4. "There are no secrets and the members of the Knesset know as much as members of the committee‰Û_" nd 5. "meeting regarding the Arab situation in Eretz [Israel]‰Û_" (October 21, 1929) 6. "Understanding the joint responsibility of all now ‰Û_ we accept the willingness to lend a hand to any action..." (September 12, 1939) 7. "loan of machines for central industry in Tel-Aviv, and specifically a direct current electric generator with a diesel engine and the equipment associated with such a plant‰Û_" (February 5, 1948) 8. Original four-page issue of Hebrew-language newspaper "Ha'aretz," 17" x 23", May 16, 1948, picturing BG on the first page 9. Original four-page issue of English-language newspaper "The Palestine Post," 16" x 23", May 16, 1948, picturing BG on the first page. Third & fourth pages blank. 10. On rare "Interim Government" stationery concerning the shortage of manpower making it difficult to do certain things (January 7, 1949) 11. letter mourning a soldier who died on January 7, 1949 in the War of Independence 12. Sending a letter of condolence to a mother who has lost her son, , reminiscing about a voyage both she and BG had to Israel (October 26, 1949) 13. To Rabbi Zorach Warhaftig, also a Signer of the Israeli Declaration of Independence, asking for "the name of the man in Haifa - to make our investigation easier‰Û_" (February 1, 1950) 14. To "Jerusalem Post" editor Gershon Agron reacting to his publishing the erroneous statement that he has agreed to the demands of the opposing General Zionists Party and had nominated two of their members to ministries (September 26, 1951) 15. To poet Anda Amir-Pinkerfeld. "We cannot truly know what happened in the days of yore ‰Û_ whatever we do have that is written in our history books as miracles that transpired we cannot guarantee is the whole truth ‰Û_Man must hear the voice of God talking to him and to his heart‰Û_" (November 3, 1953) 16. To the Chief Rabbi of Petach Tikva. "There is room in Israel fir varying opinions and perspectives, but it is the love of Israel that binds us together‰Û_" (January 14, 1954) 17. To Y. Palmon, Advisir for Arab Affairs. "[The Druze] were revealed to me as excellent fighters, disciplined and loyal ‰Û_ I hope that this tribe will cast in its lot with our people and will find complete freedom and equality in the State of Israel‰Û_" (April 19, 1954) 18. To the parents of a newlywed: "May they have a happy life full of love. May they build a blessed home in Israel. Mazel Tov." (November 29, 1954) 19. To MP Meir Yaari of the Mapam Party. "Maybe the Party you belong to has no disagreements ‰Û_ The Party I have a privilege of being attached to us not of that sort ‰Û_ but I do not know of another Party in Israel that is more loyal to the state, the Israeli people, and the vision of Jewish and human redemption‰Û_" (March 14, 1955) 20. To MP Seif E-Din E-Zoubi of Nazareth. "Following the coup d'etat which was carried out by the present heads of Egypt, the Government which I headed welcomed the rebels against King Farouk, and I expressed my hope that the revolution would ‰Û_ pave a new road of peace for itself. It is regrettable that the heads of Egypt have disappointed our hope‰Û_" (May 14, 1955) 21. To a Communist MP of the Knesset. "You can't ignore what's going on in Asia with Egyptian rulers & murderous group the Fadayin who attack all Israeli citizens ‰Û_ [Nasser] told the ‰Û÷New York Post' that he is not fighting only Israel, but the Jewish nation & Jewish fortune. The tone is reminiscent of ‰Û÷Mein Kampf'‰Û_" (July 7, 1955) 22. "We must act with renewed efforts and in every legitimate way, to bring about the day when the Jews of the Soviet Union will also be permitted to participate in the rebirth of their homeland‰Û_" (July 22, 1955) 23. To Foreign Minister Moshe Sharet, with carbon copy to Moshe Dayan. "I have no doubts in regards to General Haim Laskov's credentials, ability, and suitability for the position of deputy Chief of Staff ‰Û_ his vast experience as a commander of British units and the Hebrew brigade will make him a great asset to the IDF‰Û_" (December 24, 1955) 24. To the Editor of "Ha'aretz". "Every nation under attack and especially us, is obligated to protect itself, self-defense is a holy responsibility, it is so inscribed in the Charter of the United Nations‰Û_" (March 31, 1956) 25. To author S.Y. Agnon (later Nobel laureate). "Some seventy million Arabs live across our borders, and they extend to the Atlantic ‰Û_ Israel has a serious security problem with only two solutions: military preparedness and constant striving for peace, for war is a bankruptcy of diplomacy‰Û_" (April 10, 1956) 26. To architect Richard Kaufman: "Your plans seem to me fundamental. I will find out from the Minister of Development the fate of Eilat." (July 31, 1957) 27. "Your vote in the Knesset against the Government will not diminish the promise you were given about the schools, or any other matter. When I offered you what I offered on the political level - I did not associate it in any way with a financial reward‰Û_" (January 9, 1958) 28. "I do not know which of the two bodies is responsible for the arrangement that was made yesterday in the Knesset in remembrance of Herzl's century anniversary ‰Û_ I see it my moral and public duty to express my deep disappointment of the arrangements made for the Memorial Day which did not add honor neither to the Knesset nor the memory of the seer of the Jewish State‰Û_" (May 10, 1960) 29. "The State will establish society solely and exclusively on the foundations of truth and justice and moral values. I will fight for disclosure of the truth. In this matter, I have no fear, even if they expel me from the Party, and I will fight with all of the means at my disposal‰Û_" (November 2, 1964) 30. "I was not ‰Û÷forced to' resign - not because of misunderstanding with those around me - but for my own personal reasons - in which no other motivation, person, or external event had any role. It is correct that the Prime Minister of Burma attempted, at my request, to speak with Nasser - but like all other attempts with Nasser - it was unsuccessful‰Û_" (May 13, 1968) 31. "I always was in favor of changing the election system and my party accepted my suggestion ‰Û_ but later they reconsidered this decision. Now I'm not a member of any party and I'm not dealing with these matters anymore bit I haven't changed my opinion‰Û_" (February 25, 1972) 32. Informal photographs of David Ben-Gurion, 127 photographs (approximately 1å_" x 1 inch) on four sheets of proofs of photographs depicting Ben-Gurion, June 10-13, 1969 Many extras included. Housed in an 11.5" X 12" album with slipcase.Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

Malcolm X signed & importantly inscribed Bible while on his pilgrimage to Mecca

X Malcolm 1925 - 1965 Malcolm X signed and importantly inscribed bible, while on his pilgrimage to Mecca. It is highly symbolic of his last and most important shift away from the hatred of Elijah Muhammad's Nation of Islam. This would shortly lead to his assassination. Miniature book, inscribed and boldly signed by Malcolm X to the front fly leaf,"As Salaam Alaikum /Greetings from the Fountain /Bro Malcolm X". White textured luxurious covers with gilt titles to front and spine, 3" x 4.5". Full gilt outer page block. Stitched in white ribbon book mark. Near fine condition with slight discoloration to the lower front edge. New Testament: "William Collins Sons and Company, LTD, Glasgow, November 1938. Printed and published by the authority of his majesty King George the Sixth, an edition of the New Testament in minion type, Quadragesimo-octavo size to consist of two hundred and fifty thousand copies ..." An incredibly scarce and important signed New Testament bible, personally owned, signed and inscribed by Malcolm X during his voyage to "the Fountain" which was his reference for Mecca. Malcolm X had several epiphanies in his life with the first occurring when he converted to Islam as he was serving an 8 to 10 year prison sentence for robbery. According to Elijah Muhammad's Nation of Islam - an odd cult whose principles of racial hatred and separatism, and whose strange beliefs about whites being a genetically engineered race of "devils," stood it in contrast with Islam's more orthodox teachings. However, it was his second epiphany during his pilgrimage to Mecca that altered his beliefs: First in Cairo, the Egyptian capital, then in Jeddah, the Saudi city, Malcolm witnessed what he claims he never saw in the United States: men of all color and nationalities treating each other equally. "Throngs of people, obviously Muslims from everywhere, bound for the pilgrimage," he'd begun to notice at the airport terminal before boarding the plane for Cairo in Frankfurt, "were hugging and embracing. They were of all complexions, the whole atmosphere was of warmth and friendliness. The feeling hit me that there really wasn't any color problem here. The effect was as though I had just stepped out of a prison." To enter the state of ihram required of all pilgrims heading for Mecca, Malcolm abandoned his trademark black suit and dark tie for the two-piece white garment pilgrims must drape over their upper and lower bodies. "Every one of the thousands at the airport, about to leave for Jedda, was dressed this way," Malcolm wrote. "You could be a king or a peasant and no one would know." That, of course, is the point of ihram. As Islam interprets it, it reflects the equality of man before God. He entered Mecca in 1964 as "Malcolm X", but he left Mecca as "El Hajj Malik El-Shabazz", when he became an orthodox Muslim, adopted the Muslim name and distanced himself from the teachings of the black Muslims (which ultimately sealed his fate as he was assassinated in 1965 by members of the black Muslim group the Nation of Islam, the group with which Malcolm X had been a prominent minister for ten years before he split with them in March 1964. Based on the inscription in this book, Malcolm X used the term "As-Salaam-Alaikum," the Arabic greeting meaning "Peace be unto you," the standard salutation among members of the Nation of Islam. The greeting was routinely deployed whenever and wherever Muslims gathered and interacted, whether socially or within worship and other contexts. The second line of his inscription directly referenced that his greeting were from "The Fountain". It is widely known that Malcolm X referred to Mecca as "The Fountain" and one of his ever lasting quotes refers to Mecca as The Fountain of "truth, love, peace and brotherhood" and "The holiest and most sacred city on Earth". The signing of his name as Malcolm X would date this inscription at about April 1964, while on his voyage to Mecca, yet before converting his name to "El Hajj Malik El-Shabazz". An incredibly important book, with an extraordinary association and the only known authentic Malcolm X signed book of any kind we have ever encountered.Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

Georgia O'Keeffe signs the verso of a spectacular black and white photo

O'Keeffe Georgia 1887 - 1986 Georgia O'Keeffe signs and annotates the verso of a spectacular black and white photo of her early work Glossy black and white photo, 5.25" x 9.5", verso notated, titled and signed by Georgia O'Keeffe as "Portrait of a Day' and "Jan. 28 - 68 - Not Sold - Georgia O'Keeffe". Includes the stamp of "Oliver Baker / 27 West 15th St. New York 11 N.Y. / File No. 5594 / Chelsea ‰Û_" Signed additionally by Anita Young, O'Keeffe's sister. Accompanied by a smaller 3.5" x 3.5", colored photo of the same piece showing it hung on a wall, verso inscribed and signed by Anita Young as "Picture no XVII / on loan / Dec. 18, 1966 / Anita". This stunning photo is from O'Keeffe's early works. Portrait of a Day was completed in 1924 during her life in New York when she began creating simplified images of natural things, like leaves, flowers, and rocks. Inspired by Precisionism, her first work from that period was The Green Apple completed just two years prior in 1922. This period for Georgia would depict her notion of simple, meaningful life. O'Keeffe said that year, "it is only by selection, by elimination, and by emphasis that we get at the real meaning of things." O'Keeffe, most famous for her depiction of flowers, made about 200 flower paintings, which by the middle 1920s were large scale depictions of flowers, as if seen through a magnifying lens. Making magnified depictions of objects imbued a sense of awe and emotional intensity. The stunning photo includes Georgia's signature on the verso with the notes including her title for the photo of "Portrait of a Day", and her note "Jan.28 - 68 - Not Sold - Georgia O'Keeffe". Additionally signed by her sister with the note "Jan 28, 1968 - Not sold - Anita Young." Anita O'Keeffe Young had been collecting her sister's paintings since 1926 when she had first bought a painting of a calla lily. She was a noted hostess and philanthropist. The second smaller color photo additionally signed and inscribed by her sister, Anita, depicts Portrait of a Day hung on the wall, with its vast size shown to scale alongside a small table. A lovely signed and annotated photo of O'Keeffe's early works.Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

Framed Dickens ALS with signed envelope and valuable original photograph!

Dickens Charles 1812 - 1870 Superb Framed Display! Dickens ALS with signed envelope and valuable original photograph! Autograph Letter Signed "CD," 1 page, 4.5" x 7". On his "Gad's Hill Place, Higham by Rochester, Kent" stationery, "Friday Thirtieth June 1865." With original postmarked stamped envelope addressed by Dickens to "Charles Kent ‰Û_ / 'The Sun' office / Strand / London / W.C." Marked "Private" by Dickens and signed "CD." in the lower left with one loop flourish, but with "Charles" in the address. In apparent fine condition. Accompanied by a sepia photograph of Dickens, seated at a desk, 4" x 5.5" image, overall 4" x 6". Captioned "CHARLES DICKENS / Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1867, by J. Gurney & Son, in the Clerk's Office of the District / Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York." This photograph was taken by J. Gurney & Son in New York City on February 15, 1868, towards the end of Dickens' five month lecture tour in America. All matted together and framed under glass, overall size, 10.5" x 25". In full, "My Dear Kent. Can you come down on Sunday? Or I shall be coming down myself tomorrow (Saturday) afternoon at 4 from charing X to Gravesend, and should be delighted to bring you with me. Ever faithfully, CD" with one loop flourish. Charles Dickens lived in his Gad's Hill Pace country home from 1857 until his death in 1870. Journalist Charles Kent (1823-1902) edited The Sun newspaper in London from 1845-1870. In 1872, Kent published Charles Dickens as a Reader (Philadelphia, London: J. B. Lippincott & Co., Chapman & Hall, 1872).Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

Deed for house sale in Philadelphia signed twice by Rembrandt Peale

Peale Rembrandt 1778 - 1860 Eleanora and Rembrandt Peale sell a house in Philadelphia to his younger brother Rubens - deed signed twice by Rembrandt Peale! Attractive Manuscript Document Signed "Rem: Peale," one page, 26.5" x 16.5". Philadelphia, April 22, 1808. On vellum, neatly folded in eighths for filing. Also signed by his wife "Eleanora M Peale." On verso, signed again "Rem: Peale" beneath manuscript receipt. Fine condition. In part, "This Indenture ‰Û_ Between Rembrandt Peale of the City of Philadelphia Portrait Painter and Eleanora M. his Wife, Of the one Part, and Rubens Peale of the said City Naturalist, Of the other Part ‰Û_ in consideration of the Sum of [$1,932] Mortgage Monies which he the said Rubens Peale hath undertaken and agreed to pay, as of the further sum of [$1,498] lawful money of the United States to them paid by the said Rubens Peale at the time of the Execution hereof the Receipt whereof is hereby Acknowledged have granted bargained and sold released and confined" a two Story Brick" house and the "lot or piece of Ground thereto belonging Situate on the North Side of Walnut Street between Delaware Sixth and Seventh Streets ‰Û_ bounded on the East by ‰Û_ Swanwick's Alley, on the South by the said Walnut Street, on the West by Ground of the Philadelphia Society for the establishment and Support of Charity Schools and on the North by a six feet wide alley‰Û_" Rembrandt Peale has also signed on verso a receipt for $1,498 with which the $1,932 "Mortgage Monies he the said Rubens Peale hath undertaken and agreed to pay is in full of the consideration money within mentioned." 23-year-old Rembrandt Peale's 1801 painting of his 17-year-old brother titled "Rubens Peale with a Geranium," is now in the collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.Read more

  • USAWestport, USA
  • 1d 6h

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