Gooding & Company

Gooding and Co. is considered the leading automotive auction house in the world not only due to its vast global connections and buyers, but also to the professional and high quality personal service its automotive and marketing experts offer to customers. Gooding and Co. make sure to build strong relationships with their automobile vendors in order to satisfy future desires for their cars. 

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Objects "Gooding & Company"

1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 Sc Coupe

PROVENANCE J. Paul Getty (acquired new in 1955) Joseph Sirola, Beverly Hills, California (acquired via Mr. Getty’s mechanic circa 1964) Current Owner (acquired from the above) THIS CAR By 1951, Mercedes-Benz, with the exclusive 300 series, reclaimed the level of handcrafted magnificence that the company had been known for prior to WWII. Commonly known as the “Adenauer” due to its association with German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, the driving force behind German reconstruction, the 300 was in all ways a superbly engineered machine. Following the standard 300 and uprated 300 S, the fuel-injected 300 Sc debuted in 1955. The Sc’s extremely limited production included just 98 coupes and 102 open cars bodied by the craftsmen at Mercedes-Benz’s Sindelfingen coachworks in the finest Old World style. Details include intricate handformed and fitted panels, extensive yet tasteful brightwork, luxurious leather upholstery, and copious wooden interior trim. Although weighing nearly 4,000 lbs., the 300 Sc was capable of exceeding 110 mph in serene luxury. This 300 Sc Coupe, one of the earliest built, reportedly was first owned by famed industrialist J. Paul Getty, who is said to have used the car until his permanent move to the UK. In the early 1960s, the Sc was purchased by stage, screen, and voice-over actor Joseph Sirola, who states that he bought the Coupe via Mr. Getty’s mechanic. Mr. Sirola recently recounted that, during his more than 50 years of ownership, he drove the Sc to 28 installments of the Frank Sinatra Celebrity Invitational golf event near Palm Springs, California, where the classic Mercedes-Benz was always given pride of place in front of the venue by the valets. In the engine compartment, the air filter housing and its ducts were chromeplated long ago, and the aluminum intake manifold was once polished to a high luster. This combination indicates that this 300 Sc might have been used by Mercedes-Benz prior to its initial delivery as a display or press car. According to its factory build record, the Sc was originally finished in Silver Metallic (DB 180), with a black leather interior. The door panels, headliner, and other sections of the interior appear to retain their factory materials. Far rarer than 300 SLs and nearly twice as expensive, the 300 Sc line was available only to a privileged few, and the surviving examples of the tiny 200-car production run are a testament to the capability of Mercedes-Benz to craft an extremely labor-intensive, low-volume vehicle while in mass production on other models. Never restored, and displaying less than 75,000 miles, this fascinating Sc could provide the basis for a high-level restoration, or may be recommissioned for a return to the road. The avenues of the mid-century-steeped desert city of Palm Springs remain a most appropriate destination. Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 1d 14h

1960 Mercedes-Benz 190 SL

Introduced in 1954 at the New York International Auto Show, the Mercedes- Benz 190 SL was the 300 SL’s stylish and more affordable sibling. It shared the 300 SL’s high build quality, as well as its grille shape and “eyebrow” fender accents. This example was delivered new to Lt. Milton Price of the US Seventh Army, stationed in Stuttgart. According to the consignor, Lt. Price came home to the San Francisco Bay Area, bringing the car with him. He moved to Tacoma, Washington, and then to Texas, and subsequently the car was purchased by Barbara and Alden McElrath of Oakland, California. According to the consignor, Mrs. McElrath kept the car from 1963 to 2011. Sympathetically restored starting in 1999, with attention to the paint, interior, and mechanical components, this 190 SL has an electric fuel pump and electronic ignition that add increased reliability. Additionally, the car is equipped with a Nardi steering wheel, Kinderseat, and period-correct Judson supercharger, which was rebuilt by Judson specialist George Folchi in 2014. Accompanying items include an owner’s manual, warranty paperwork with early oil-change stamps, radio instruction booklet, and sales brochure. This is an excellent opportunity to acquire a unique 190 SL with a rich history. Finished in a desirable color with many welcome period accessories, it will make an excellent companion on the open road or at local events. Read more

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  • 1d 14h

1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II

PROVENANCE Chris Amon (acquired new in 1967) Current Owner (acquired in 2014) THIS CAR Ferrari launched the 330 series in 1964 as Maranello’s sequel to the impressive and popular 250 lineup. First out of the gate was the 330 America, numerically named for the displacement per cylinder, à la Ferrari custom. In 1965, the 330 GT 2+2 Series II debuted, showcasing a front-end redesigned by Pininfarina’s Tom Tjaarda. The 330 GT 2+2 Series II emerged as a sophisticated grand tourer – clearly of the Ferrari bloodline with race-bred components – and as an important element of Ferrari’s lucrative and prestigious road-going lineup. Of the 1,080 Ferrari 330s built between 1964 and 1967, just 460 were Series II cars. Chris Amon, the internationally lauded Formula 1 driver for Scuderia Ferrari from 1967–1969, purchased this car, chassis 09213, new from the factory in 1967. A copy of the original factory invoice, showing that Amon ordered the car with power steering, air-conditioning, and a console for a radio, is included with the sale. Amon, in an e-mail to the current owner, recalled driving 09213 in Italy and England, and noted, “Whilst Ferrari would not give his drivers a car, he did give a very good discount and I seem to remember selling it for rather more than I paid.” According to a report by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, the car remained with Amon until 1969. Little is known about where the car lived from that time until the consignor’s purchase in 2014; it was advertised for sale in the December 1980 issue of Ferrari Market Letter by the Fine Car Store in California, and it is believed to have been stored in California for many years. At some point, 09213 underwent a color change, but over the past 18 months it has been meticulously restored, mechanically and cosmetically, by a Ferrari specialist in France; the process was photographed and exhaustively documented. The body was taken down to bare metal and returned to its original Grigio Fumo (Smoke Gray). The engine was comprehensively rebuilt, as were the braking and electrical systems. The factory air-conditioning system had been removed, but during restoration a correct unit was located, rebuilt, and fitted. The dash was renovated and the interior reupholstered in rich red leather by specialists Atelier du Mont Ventoux in France. With about 500 km recorded since restoration, this 330 GT 2+2 Series II is superb by any measure, and comes with a portfolio of photographs, including a photo of Amon with the car, copies of e-mail correspondence with Amon, and recent invoices. In May 2017, this incredible 330 GT 2+2 Series II was at the Ferrari factory in Maranello, receiving finishing touches and undergoing Ferrari Classiche certification, which was pending at the time of cataloguing. The stunning coupe offers a unique opportunity for the discerning Ferrari collector to acquire a 330 GT in superb condition that carries the exclusive provenance of a factory grand prix ace. Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 1d 14h

1946 Ford Marmon-Herrington Super Deluxe Station Wagon

The Ford Marmon-Herrington holds a unique place in automobile history, predicting the modern sport utility body style, yet displaying the engineering excellence of the V-8 Ford era. An early creation of Howard and Walter Marmon won the Indianapolis 500 in 1911, famously using a rearview mirror for the first time. Walter Marmon’s partner in the new venture, Marmon-Herrington, was Arthur W. Herrington, a British-born engineer with experience at Harley-Davidson. The new company won various military contracts, scoring particular success with a truck-based armored car. Indeed, Herrington would later perform his most famous work during the war, designing the long-beloved Jeep. Postwar, Marmon-Herrington diversified, building delivery trucks and more than 1,500 trolley buses. The company survives today, still manufacturing high-quality, heavy-duty components such as axles and transfer cases. From the mid-1930s until 1959, Marmon-Herrington partnered with Ford, converting cars and trucks to formidable four-wheel-drive machines. The bodies and drivetrains were removed and additional cross members welded to the frames to support the added weight of the transfer cases and additional driven axle. Front wheels were driven using a modified Ford rear axle, and steering was enabled by adding constant velocity joints to the axle ends. The conversion almost doubled the price of the upgraded Ford over the standard car, and due to the labor-intensive process, production volume was low. Today, perhaps as few as 10 examples from each model year survive. This 1946 Super Deluxe Station Wagon was restored circa 2008 in the shops of famed Woodie collector Nick Alexander. Although this Marmon-Herrington no longer carried the majority of its original body, it was an otherwise complete, intact example, and therefore an excellent basis for a premium-quality restoration. Work was carried out using period-correct steel panels, birch, and contrasting mahogany from a 1946 Ford Super Deluxe Station Wagon. Overall, the resulting presentation is excellent, with lustrous paint and beautifully varnished wood. Inside, the Art Deco-era interior is stunning, with three rows of bench seating. The engine bay is fully detailed, with the block painted the factory-correct color. Considering the extremely limited availability of four-wheel-drive passenger vehicles during this early postwar period, combined with the outstanding engineering capabilities of Marmon-Herrington, the importance and historical significance of this stout Woodie wagon becomes clear. Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 1d 14h

1959 MGA Twin-Cam Roadster

In the mid-1950s, MG’s experimental racing department began developing a competition version of the engine that powered the popular MGA. That work culminated in the 1958 debut of the MGA Twin-Cam, which delivered roughly 60% more power than the base model and was built in a quantity of 2,111 examples through early 1960. Approximately 1,788 cars were bodied as roadsters, and the open Twin-Cam has since evolved into the most collectible of the MGA variants, offering style and performance. According to a BMHT certificate, chassis YD3/734 was built in October 1958 and immediately dispatched to the US. The roadster was desirably equipped with center-locking disc wheels and four-wheel Dunlop disc brakes, and was finished in Old English White paint over a black interior. In the mid-1980s, the Twin-Cam was reportedly acquired as a project by a Seattle-based marque enthusiast. Several members of the local MG club assisted with a complete refurbishment that returned the roadster to concours-ready condition, after which the car was enjoyed at local events and club gatherings. Passing through the respected collection of Joe McMurrey in 2012, the MGA is now offered in a period-appropriate “club racing” configuration with a grille-mounted spotlamp and an Auster windscreen; the original windscreen is included. The Twin-Cam has been recently serviced, is accompanied by manuals and a tool kit, and presents as an exceptional example. Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 1d 14h

1965 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III Saloon

The Silver Cloud III was introduced in 1962 and retained all of the splendid features of previous models, plus modern refinements: twin headlamps, shorter radiator shell, sloping bonnet, lighter power steering, and a notable increase in power. The original owner, an Atlanta businessman and art collector, specified electric windows, electric antenna, Dunlop whitewall tires, and “Sundym” glass, but did not want the model insignia on the trunk lid. When new, the car was finished in the elegant color scheme of Shell Grey with black Connolly leather upholstery. According to Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club records, this Silver Cloud was retained by its original owner for about a decade before passing to a collector in Indiana who kept it for over 30 years. Enhanced by recent mechanical and cosmetic freshening, the understated Shell Grey paintwork is well kept and the original black leather interior is in outstanding condition. A Silver Cloud specialist familiar with the car recently described it as being quite excellent in every way, reporting, “…it is a car I’d be proud to own.” The Silver Cloud III model, rugged yet elegant, benefited from years of production refinement. With a splendid reputation for quality, it is highly esteemed by collectors who consider that chief stylist John Blatchley reached the pinnacle of his career with this elegant and graceful design, the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III Saloon. Read more

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  • 1d 14h

1970 Porsche 917K

PROVENANCE Porsche AG (built in 1970 and retained for testing) Joseph Siffert (acquired from the above in 1970) Pierre Prieur (acquired from the estate of the above by 1978) Current Owner (acquired from the above via Modena Motorsport in 2002) RACE HISTORY Le Mans Pre-Training, Le Mans, France, April 11–12, 1970, Siffert/Hailwood, No. 22 Nürburgring Test, Nürburg, Germany, May 19–21, 1970, No. 22 Ehra-Lessien Test, Ehra-Lessien, Germany, May 23, 1970 LITERATURE Walter Näher, Porsche 917: Archive and Works Catalog 1968–1975, p. 76 Michael Keyser with Jonathan Williams, A French Kiss with Death, numerous photos throughout Michael Keyser, Behind Le Mans: The Film in Photographs, numerous photos throughout John Horsman, Racing in the Rain: My Years with Brilliant Drivers, Legendary Sports Cars, and a Dedicated Team, 1970 Le Mans discussed on p. 227 Siegfried Rauch, Unser Le Mans Jürgen Barth and Gustav Büsing, The Porsche Book: The Complete History of Types and Models Ian Bamsey, Porsche 917: The Ultimate Weapon Peter Hinsdale, The Fabulous Porsche 917 Jörg Thomas Födisch, Jost Nesshöver, Rainer Rossbach, and Harold Schwarz, Porsche 917: The Heroes, the Victories, the Myth Karl Ludvigsen, Porsche: Excellence Was Expected: The Comprehensive History of the Company, Its Cars and Its Racing Heritage Peter Morgan, Porsche 917: The Winning Formula Larry Pihera, The Making of a Winner: The Porsche 917 Glen Smale, Porsche 917: The Complete Photographic History Gordon Wingrove, Porsche 917: The Undercover Story THE PORSCHE 917 At the end of the 1968 racing season, the Automobile Club de l’Ouest (ACO) released several new important regulations aimed at reducing average speeds. The only cars that would be eligible to compete for the World Manufacturers’ Championship were three-liter prototypes, exotic racing cars built in small numbers, and five-liter sports cars that had to be constructed in a series of 25 identical examples. Porsche recognized this new dictate as an opportunity to create a world-beating five-liter sports racer that would be campaigned alongside the three-liter 908. If the new car was at all successful, Porsche would finally have a serious chance of overall victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The new Porsche was the direct result of years of intense research. Though it employed the most modern concepts in automotive design, the new car was absolutely in keeping with Porsche tradition. The foundation of the new model was an incredibly lightweight aluminum space-frame chassis. Similarly, the suspension systems made extensive use of lightweight materials, such as titanium and magnesium. Glued to this frame was a striking, streamlined body made from thin fiberglass. Covered in NACA ducts and suspension-controlled aerodynamic flaps, the shape of the new Porsche was honed in the wind tunnels at Stuttgart Technical Institute. Each car was designed to wear both short and long tails, the latter specially designed with Le Mans’ Mulsanne Straight in mind. The magnificent car’s air-cooled flat 12-cylinder engine is an undisputed masterpiece of automotive engineering designed by the legendary Hans Mezger. With dual overhead camshafts, twin-plug ignition, Bosch mechanical fuel injection, dry sump lubrication, and the distinctive, mechanically driven six-blade fan, it delivered 580 bhp at 8,400 rpm in original 4.5-liter form. At the Geneva Auto Show in March 1969, Porsche unveiled the new car, named the 917, to the amazement and utter surprise of the motoring world. On Monday, April 21st, Porsche staged 25 completed 917s in a perfect row in the courtyard outside Werk I to greet the inspectors sent by the International Sporting Commission (CSI) of the FIA. Never before had so many world-class sports racing cars been built in so short a time. Even after just a few races, the 917 earned a fearsome reputation. Vic Elford stated that “the early 917 really was virtually undrivable.” Fellow Porsche works driver Gerhard Mitter nicknamed it “the Ulcer.” In light of these issues, Porsche continued to perfect the 917 throughout the 1969 season, developing the car race after race, test session after grueling test session. By 1970, the new-and-improved 917K (K was for Kurz, or “short”) was ready to take on the world. Throughout the entirety of the 1970 and 1971 seasons, the Porsche 917K was the car to beat. During this period, the 917K achieved back-to-back wins at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, and Porsche won its second and third Manufacturers’ Championships. Except for a victory at Sebring by Scuderia Ferrari and three wins by the Alfa Romeo Autodelta team, Porsche won every championship race on the calendar for two years. In just four years of production, including two years in turbocharged Can-Am specification, the Porsche 917K was established as the ultimate sports racing car of the era. Its success meant that Porsche, previously respected as a class winner, had now attained the sport’s highest level of acclaim. JO SIFFERT Born on July 7, 1936, in Fribourg, Switzerland, Jo Siffert – affectionately known as “Seppi” among family and friends – emerged from humble origins to become one of the most successful drivers of his era. By 1960, Siffert had gained valuable experience on motorcycles and campaigning a Stanguellini Formula Junior before heading to Formula 1. While he never had a ride with a top team, Siffert earned two wins, six podium finishes, and 68 championship points in 96 Grand Prix starts. It was in sports cars that Siffert really earned his reputation. His meteoric career with Porsche made him a household name and closely paralleled the Stuttgart firm’s rise to prominence. After a brief outing at Spa in one of the earliest 917s, Siffert told fellow Porsche works driver Brian Redman, “We’ll let the others find out what’s going to break.” Only at the end of the season and after much urging did Siffert finally agree to race the new 917, and on August 10, 1969, at the 1000 Km Zeltweg, Seppi and Kurt Ahrens presented Porsche with victory number one for the 917. During the 1970 and 1971 seasons, Siffert drove the much-improved 917K and the 908/3 for the works-backed JWA Gulf-Porsche team. He won four championship races and secured a further seven podium finishes while helping Porsche capture the Manufacturers’ Championship for Makes in three consecutive years. THE EARLY HISTORY OF 917-024 As documented in Walter Näher’s definitive work on the 917, Porsche 917: Archive and Works Catalog 1968–1975, it was very common for Porsche to renumber 917s during their racing careers. Porsche factory records indicate that the first 917-024 was built in 1969 and renumbered during its racing life as 002, 005, and finally 006. After months of rigorous testing work at the Nürburgring, Hockenheim, Weissach, and Zeltweg, the chassis was subsequently wrecked and scrapped in February 1970. Porsche needed a shorttail car for the important Le Mans pre-training in April 1970 and prepared a frame, numbering it 917-024. Notably, Näher believed that the frame used may have been the “Sample Frame,” which was the first 917 frame ever produced. This new machine, prepared from new to “K” specifications, is the car offered here. These tests would be Porsche’s ideal opportunity to prove that the shorttail model was capable of conquering the high-speed Le Mans circuit. Painted in Porsche’s traditional white and wearing No. 22, the new 917-024 was entrusted to Brian Redman and Mike Hailwood. When Redman set the fastest times of April’s test in 024, it was more apparent than ever that Porsche would have an opportunity to win the famed 24-hour race in June. Chassis 917-024 would go on to further testing at the Nürburgring and at Ehra- Lessien in May 1970. On June 25, Jo Siffert purchased the car from Porsche, as documented by copies of correspondence acquired from Porsche’s archives. STEVE McQUEEN’S TRIBUTE TO LE MANS With a massive budget, the finest contemporary race cars, some of the era’s best professional drivers, and a star actor turned racing driver, it comes as no surprise that the 1971 film Le Mans is as legendary as the race it depicts. While some of the film’s racing footage was captured during the actual 1970 24 Hours of Le Mans, much was shot on set with both actors and professional drivers at the wheel of various Porsche 917s and Ferrari 512s, among other sports cars, with sequences famously filmed at racing speeds. Given the film’s plot, it was necessary to have several Ferrari 512s and Porsche 917s as the major stars of the film. Steve McQueen’s Solar Productions purchased one 917K from Porsche directly, while JWA loaned another. A third car, 917-024, was leased to Solar Productions by Jo Siffert, along with many other cars used in the movie. As chronicled by numerous photos of Siffert’s fleet before shooting, 917-024 was initially numbered 22 and sported a livery featuring an orange roof that continued down the tail section. It is difficult to know exactly which car is featured in each moment in the film, but historian Walter Näher believed that the drivers, including McQueen himself, swapped between cars as necessary. After assembling the fleet, the Solar Productions crew was tasked with mounting cameras and using camera cars to film the action. While the three Gulf-liveried 917s are shown in most action sequences battling the Ferraris, they too were used as camera cars for some of the best racing sequences. Today, 917-024 still retains the mounting points used to affix camera rigging to its rear frame tubes. Porsche 917s used in the production of Le Mans must be among the most recognizable and impactful automobiles ever to grace the silver screen. That the movie ended with a Gulf-liveried 917 winning the Le Mans race only added to the mythic nature of these cars. JO SIFFERT AND 917-024 After the filming of Le Mans, 917-024 remained in Jo Siffert’s ownership and returned with him to Fribourg, Switzerland. In July 1971, he famously drove 917-024 to his own birthday party, as documented by a photo taken by his dear friend Jean Tinguely, a famous Swiss artist. Unfortunately, Jo Siffert died on October 24, 1971, when the suspension of his BRM failed at 160 mph. Motor racing was robbed of a true master at just 35 years of age. At Siffert’s funeral, 917-024 led the procession, highlighting his intimate relationship with his favorite racing car. Following Siffert’s passing, 917-024 remained in Fribourg for a number of years, before it was sold to M. Pierre Prieur, a collector from Saclay, France. An original declaration of importation dated August 25, 1978, marks the Porsche’s passage from Switzerland into France. HIDDEN IN PARIS In 2001, 917-024 once again returned to the public eye when this incredible automotive treasure was discovered in a warehouse outside Paris, where it had been quietly stored during M. Prieur’s ownership. Still in its Gulf JWA livery from Siffert’s ownership, the 917 was remarkably untouched after 20-plus years in hiding. Three decals from Joseph Siffert Automobiles Fribourg remained on the rear of the Porsche and, interestingly, the car was wearing race No. 65, though there is no record of it having been raced since it was featured in the film. An original space-saver spare, Firestone fuel cell, and Firestone Super Sports GP tires were still in place, among other unique details. There was even a handwritten tag hanging from the key stating, “Einspritzpumpe von Le Mans-Einstellung fünf Raster magerer gestellt” (a simple note that the injection pump runs five steps leaner in the Le Mans setup) with the initials “H.L.,” believed those of Porsche driver Herbert Linge. News of the remarkable find traveled quickly throughout the automotive world, and the Porsche was featured in Motor Klassik’s March 2002 issue, including staged photographs of 917-024 taken in a barn, complete with bales of hay. While barn finds are always exciting moments, the discovery of a 917K surely ranks among the greatest and most electrifying discoveries of all time. Moreover, 917-024 remained largely as it was during Siffert’s ownership. While in need of restoration, the Porsche was a time capsule example of the legendary 917K. 917-024 TODAY Following its discovery, 917-024 was acquired in early 2002 by a Swiss gentleman whose growing collection of racing cars was in need of a centerpiece. Eventually, the decision was reached to restore the car, a process that was executed with a methodical effort. Working with Modena Motorsport, 917-024 was inspected and photographed, and a complete disassembly took place. Images show the significant originality and undisturbed nature of the Porsche. Furthermore, the completeness of 917-024 is overwhelmingly evident, with the only notable missing component being the 12-cylinder engine, which had been on loan to Siffert from Porsche and presumably returned to the manufacturer after his death. To complete the car, engine 917-021 was purchased from a private collector based in the US, as documented in the car’s file. The goal of this extensive work was to bring the 917 back to its former glory as a usable racing car, as the owner intended to drive it in the Le Mans Classic 24 Hour after the restoration. To achieve the highest level of safety for on-track use, it was deemed prudent to build a full replacement for the original frame, which showed typical corrosion and multiple cracks from usage. The restoration was completed and then tested at Circuit Dijon-Prenois in France, and otherwise remained unused. When the time came to sell 917-024, it was decided that the original frame should be carefully restored and installed to provide the ultimate in historic authenticity. Swiss racing and restoration specialists Graber Sportgarage were entrusted to manage the project, which was completed by some of the world’s most skilled Porsche specialists. Working closely with Graber was an ex-Porsche factory engineer, Walter Näher. Mr. Näher, who was considered among the utmost authorities on the 917, started with Porsche in 1969 and was around the 917 project for its entire run. Prior to his passing on March 11, 2017, he used factory records, to which he had complete access, to produce the most comprehensive published work on the 917 to date. Numerous reports filed to 917-024’s owner during the restoration process, which coincided with bi-weekly visits to supervise the project, accompany the car, lending a knowledgeable insight to its historic significance and the accuracy of its restoration. German experts who work closely with the Porsche factory collection were hired to restore the original frame while retaining as much originality as possible. This work was carried out with the utmost care and was thoroughly photo-documented. Composites specialists Roy and Seppi Korytko installed the body, which was intricately bonded to the restored original frame. Graber then assembled the car using its original components, retaining the period Firestone tires, finally restoring 917-024 to its former glory in the Gulf JWA livery worn by both Siffert’s 917Ks in competition and by this car for the majority of its existence. The level of presentation is outstanding, and the quality of the work is readily apparent. Chassis 917-024 has a powerful presence, a sort of magnetism when seen in person. Unused since completion, its immaculate condition provides a unique opportunity for a new owner to show the 917K at top-level concours d’elegance ahead of any potential on-track endeavors. Importantly, accompanying the car at auction are the reproduction chassis built for the car’s initial restoration, along with pieces of its original bodywork and sections of the original chassis tubing that were replaced for safety during the most recent restoration. Also joining the car are extensive documents from the consignor’s ownership and the aforementioned reports from Walter Näher. Porsche 917-024 has a story like no other, and given its many individual merits, possesses a substantial and unique history among 917s. The Porsche’s three private owners and decades of long-term storage have ensured that 917-024 is one of the best examples of this famous model. An integral part of the 917 program as a test car, 917-024 played a significant role in Porsche’s assault on the 1970 24 Hours of Le Mans. As a star in the film Le Mans and Jo Siffert’s personal car, this incredible 917K has qualities that simply cannot be claimed by other examples. Beyond this, given the inherent greatness and rarity of the Porsche 917 model, 917-024 is, quite simply, one of the finest racing cars in existence. Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 1d 14h

1993 Porsche 964 Carrera 3.8 RSR

PROVENANCE Mark Sandridge, Westfield Center, Ohio (acquired from Porsche Motorsport in 1994) Karl McKeever, Morrow, Georgia (acquired from the above in 1996) Neil Primrose, England (acquired from the above in 2006) RACE HISTORY 24 Hours of Daytona, February 1994, Katthofer, Maylander, Grohs, and Sandridge, No. 2 (4th Overall, 2nd in GTU/LM GT2) 12 Hours of Sebring, March 1994, Ham, Varde, and Sandridge, No. 49 (5th Overall, 1st in GTU/LM GT2) Road Atlanta, April 1994, Sandridge, No. 49 (15th Overall, 5th in GTU) 3 Hours of Watkins Glen, June 1994, Sandridge and Varde, No. 49 (11th Overall, 1st in GTU/LM GT2) Indianapolis, October 1994, Sandridge, No. 49 (25th Overall, 9th in GTU) 1 Hour of Lime Rock, May 2000, Lewis and McKeever, No. 49 (12th Overall, 8th in GTU) Road America Grand Am Road Racing Championship, July 2000, Lewis and McKeever, No. 49 (23rd Overall, 5th in GTU) Watkins Glen, August 2000, Lewis and McKeever, No. 49 (26th Overall, 13th in GTU) LITERATURE Ulrich Upietz, Porsche Sport ’94 Phil Royale, “The Man Who Loves Hardcore 911s,” The Porsche 911 RS Book, pp. 126–133 THIS CAR The 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 was a means to getting the 911 Carrera 2.8 RSR – or RennSport Rennwagen – homologated for FIA Group 4 racing. In its debut season, the RSR won the Targa Florio, the 24 Hours of Daytona, and the 12 Hours of Sebring, earning Porsche the World Manufacturers’ and IMSA Driver’s Championships. Subsequent models also dominated the competition, with victories in IMSA, Trans Am, and the FIA World Championship. By 1993, Porsche introduced the 964 Carrera 3.8 RS, constructed in a very small series by Porsche’s Racing Department in Weissach. The RSR competition version – of which just 51 examples were built – would rack up stunning race results, with class and overall victories at important endurance races across the globe. The RSR was set apart from the “standard” road model through an interior and exterior stripped down and modified for circuit use. The inside contained a welded-in roll cage and the barest of racing essentials. The Turbo body shell employed aggressive fiberglass front and rear spoilers, while the aluminum roof, doors, and front deck contributed to weight savings of 350 lbs. from the standard car, imparting excellent agility and power-to-weight ratio. Matched to a five-speed gearbox, Porsche claimed an “out of the box” 325 hp at 6,900 rpm for the dry sump 3.8-liter M64/04 RSR-specific engine, although reviewers in the period believed the official statistics were highly underrated. This RSR, chassis no. 81, was ordered via the Porsche Special Vehicle Department and supplied in early 1994 to Mark Sandridge of Westfield Center, Ohio, a privateer racer whose company produced refrigerated foods for the retail and food service industries. Finished in Grand Prix White, the RSR was campaigned under Sandridge’s Team Salad banner during the 1994 IMSA GT season with spectacular results, notching an impressive 2nd in Class and 4th Overall at the 24 Hours of Daytona, winning its class at both Sebring and Watkins Glen, and ultimately earning Sandridge the IMSA GT2 Championship, 2nd in the Exxon Championship, and 2nd in Class in the World Porsche Cup. Following its triumphant year, the RSR was sold in 1996 to Karl McKeever of Morrow, Georgia. McKeever continued the RSR’s race career, comprehensively updating the Porsche over the years via Porsche Motorsports North America. Changes included an updated 3.8-liter engine utilizing slide-valve throttle bodies and reportedly producing a prodigious 410 hp. These updates enabled this RSR to compete for podiums at SCCA and Porsche Club of America events until 2006, at which time the car was acquired by UK-based Porsche enthusiast Neil Primrose, drummer of the Scottish rock band Travis. Presented in its winning 1994 Team Salad livery, this RSR has been sparingly used, but maintained and stored correctly under current ownership. The latest engine and gearbox rebuilds by PMNA still have 20 racing hours available on them, according to the consignor. Although exhibiting some signs of use from its racing career, chassis 81 is a well-preserved and original example of one of Porsche’s most celebrated racing cars, with systems having been recently serviced. Importantly, this RSR is said by the consignor to have never been re-shelled during its racing career, and it still carries its original chassis number. Tech stickers from races in IMSA and the SCCA are still present on the roll cage and the car is noted by the consignor to have never had a significant accident. In addition to its original parts, this RSR comes with an extensive spares package including original wheels – which were never used in competition – electronic control units, suspension parts, and bodywork options, and other documentation such as a Porsche Manufacturer’s Statement of Origin, Porsche Motorsport North America invoices and correspondence, race history, and period photographs. Standing on the shoulders of giants, the 964 3.8 RSR is among the most successful racers in modern Porsche history. Ready for further driving use or exhibition, this rare, factory-built RSR has a provenance and winning race history that make it a particularly desirable example. Read more

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1954 Aston Martin DB2/4 Drophead Coupe

PROVENANCE Edith Field, San Francisco, California (acquired new in 1954 via British Motor Cars) B. Steele, Atlanta, Georgia (acquired in 1964) O.M. Riley, US (acquired in 1968) Terry L. Daniel, Dickson, Tennessee (acquired in 1981) Toly Arutunoff, Tennessee (acquired circa 1982) Alastair Walker, Berkshire, England (acquired in 1985) Innes Ireland, Berkshire, England (acquired in 1986) David Clark, London, England (acquired in 1988) Tarek Mahmoud, London, England (acquired from the above in 2006) Nigel Pritchard, St. Peter, Jersey, Channel Islands (acquired from the above by 2011) Adrian Johnson, England (acquired from the above in 2011) Current Owner (acquired from the above) EXHIBITED Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance®, April 1955 (Third in Class) AMOC Autumn Concours at Chavenage House, September 2011 (Best in Class) LITERATURE Robert T. Devlin, Pebble Beach: A Matter of Style, pictured on p. 175 Stanley Nowak, Automobile Quarterly, vol. 26, no. 4, “Aston Martin Bertone” Jerry Rogers, AM Quarterly, 1976, “The Bertone-Bodied Aston Martins” Roger McCouat, AM Quarterly, Autumn 2004, “The Bertone-Bodied Aston Martins of S.H. Arnolt” THIS CAR The Bertone-bodied Aston Martins of the 1950s paired Italian design flair with solid British engineering. The collaboration was significant, as it eventually paved the way for the Touring-styled DB4, 5, and 6, and the special Zagato-bodied DB4 GTs. One of only two DB2/4 chassis built with this striking convertible body style, and possessing a fascinating provenance, LML/506 is an important coachbuilt Aston Martin from the early years of the David Brown era. The Aston Martin DB2 debuted in 1950 with attractive yet typically British conservative styling. Based in Chicago, S.H. “Wacky” Arnolt made his money in steel, later diversifying into automobile distribution. Wacky loved foreign cars, and at the Torino Auto Show in 1951 he struck a deal with Carrozzeria Bertone to build some custom-bodied MG TDs and later a limited number of Aston Martin DB2/4s. The spectacular DB2/4 Drophead Coupe presented here is among this exclusive group of Bertone-bodied Aston Martins. According to factory records, chassis LML/506 was completed by Aston Martin on June 9, 1953, and dispatched to Carrozzeria Bertone in Torino on November 16th. While Nuccio Bertone had in-house stylist Franco Scaglione design three DB2/4 Spiders (LML/503, LML/505, and LML/507), the two Drophead Coupes built – chassis LML/504 and LML/506 – have long been attributed to freelance designer Giovanni Michelotti. Not only did these two virtually identical cars possess a decidedly Italian flair, they maintained traditional Aston Martin design cues, including the firm’s distinctively shaped radiator grille. Ordered through British Motor Car Distributors in California, chassis LML/506 was delivered to its first owner, Edith Field, on November 12, 1954. Mrs. Field was a charter member of the San Francisco Opera Association and an avid car enthusiast, also owning an AC Ace-Bristol. In 1955, Mrs. Field entered her new Bertone-bodied Aston Martin in the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance® and received Third Place in the class for Two Seater Sports Cars, $4,500–$10,000. A photograph of Mrs. Field’s Aston Martin appears in Robert T. Devlin’s classic book, Pebble Beach: A Matter of Style. After passing among a succession of owners, LML/506 was rediscovered in Tennessee in the mid-1980s. In 1986, the coachbuilt DB2/4 was sold to famed Formula 1 and former Aston Martin works racing driver Innes Ireland. After a short time, Ireland sold LML/506, still in unrestored condition, to David Clark of London classic car dealer Taylor & Crawley. During Mr. Clark’s ownership, a restoration was begun with Mill Lane Engineering, though the project eventually stalled. From there, the Bertone-bodied Aston Martin was sold in 2006 to collector and racer Tarek Mahmoud, who had Aston Martin specialist Goldsmith and Young complete the restoration “to a concours standard.” Soon after the restoration was completed, LML/506 was sold to another UK collector. In September 2011, the Bertone Drophead Coupe made its post-restoration debut at the AMOC Autumn Concours held at Chavenage House, winning First Prize in the Feltham Aston Class. Since this initial outing, LML/506 has not been exhibited and, most recently, has resided in a private collection based in Southern California. Still in excellent overall condition, this coachbuilt Aston Martin is offered with a proper tool kit and, more important, a remarkably extensive history file. Included inside are numerous magazine articles on the Bertone-bodied Aston Martins, a copy of the factory build sheet, BMHT Certificate, correspondence, restoration records, photographs, and ownership documents. More than just a thorough history, the file provides wonderful color to an outstanding and truly unique vehicle. The appearance of LML/506 at auction represents a special opportunity to acquire a coachbuilt Aston Martin of quality and distinction. Given its attractive open Bertone coachwork, fascinating provenance, and showquality restoration, this Aston Martin is a very special example of the DB2/4 – one that is worthy of serious consideration. Read more

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1994 Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6 S Flachbau

In 1993, Porsche created a limited-edition 911 Turbo to mark the end of Type 964 production. Produced by Porsche’s Exclusive Department, and known as the 911 Turbo 3.6 S Flachbau – or Flatnose – the model revived a concept that dated to the 1980s when the company offered the 930 Turbo with a front-end treatment inspired by the 935 race cars. Based on the 911 Turbo 3.6, the Flachbau was produced in three separate series for Japan (X83), ROW or “Rest of the World” (X84), and the US (X85). While minor differences existed between them, all Turbo S Flachbau models featured exposed pop-up headlights, exclusive front and rear spoilers, and intakes in the rear fenders. The other commonality was the X88 sport tuning option. Based on the IMSA 3.6 Turbo engine built by Andial for Brumos Racing in 1993, the M64/50S engine produced 385 bhp, 25 more than the standard Turbo 3.6, with the extra power derived from a larger turbocharger, modified cylinder heads, higher-lift camshafts, and revised air intake. Beyond the internal engine modifications, the X88 option also included a front-mounted oil cooler and four-pipe exhaust system. This particular 964 Turbo 3.6 S Flachbau was completed by Porsche’s Exclusive Department in Zuffenhausen in December 1993, and sold new to its first owner in France in June 1994. One of only 27 Flachbau models produced for the Rest of the World market, this car is the only Grand Prix White specimen, and one of four finished in that color out of the worldwide production run of 76. As noted by its factory build sheet, this left-hand-drive Flachbau came equipped with a plethora of equipment such as a full black leather interior, air-conditioning, dual airbags, and 18" Speedline RS-Cup wheels. Later exported to Japan, this Flachbau was subsequently purchased by the current owner from Prescott Kelly, a well-known Porsche collector and dealer who also managed the importation process, including the application for the “show or display” exemption, which was granted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Soon after importation, and with receipts on file, the Flachbau was serviced, including new Michelin Pilot Sport tires, while the Japanese radio was replaced with a rare and correct Porsche Classic Radio. Registering approximately 47,000 km – 29,000 miles – on its odometer, and presenting beautifully throughout, this Flachbau is stated to retain the majority of its original paint. Supplied with books, tools, jack, spare, air compressor, original seatbelts, and factory build sheet, this 964 Turbo 3.6 S Flachbau is the ultimate incarnation of Porsche’s classic 1989–1994 911. With very few built, the opportunity to acquire a highly original and gently used example is one not to be missed by the serious Porsche collector. Read more

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1937 Jaguar SS 100 2 1/2 Litre

PROVENANCE Robert Wood, Allentown, Pennsylvania (acquired by 1963) Gary Ford, Pipersville, Pennsylvania (acquired from the above circa 1998) Brian Classic, Cheshire, UK (acquired from the above circa 2004) John Hewitt Murphy, Santa Fe, New Mexico (acquired from the above in 2004) Private Collection, Mexico (acquired in 2012) Current Owner (acquired from the above) EXHIBITED Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, Amelia Island, Florida, 2002 (First in Class) Radnor Hunt Concours d’Elegance, Malvern, Pennsylvania, 2005 (Class Award) JCNA National Concours d’Elegance, 2007 (Prewar Class Champion) Santa Fe Concorso, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 2010 (First in Class) Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance®, Pebble Beach, California, 2015 (First in Class) THIS CAR In late 1935, William Lyons’ SS Cars Ltd. introduced the Jaguar, a new model equipped with a powerful 2 1/2-litre six-cylinder engine tuned by Harry Weslake. This engine was soon implemented across the company’s model line, and in the SS 100 – a beautiful, two-seat sports car – it allowed for a top speed approaching 100 mph. Although just 198 examples were built through 1938, the original 2 1/2-litre SS 100 model found tremendous success in competition, serving as a cornerstone of Jaguar’s rich motor sport legacy. This breathtaking example perfectly illustrates the qualities of aesthetic beauty and thoroughbred performance that have made this prewar Jaguar model so sought-after among collectors. According to the Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust, chassis 49026 was completed on December 24, 1937, finished in black paint with gray trim. Retailed through Henley’s Limited of London, the car passed into unknown ownership, though it was later registered as “REL 525.” Exported to the US by the early 1960s, Robert Wood of Allentown, Pennsylvania, purchased the SS 100 from one of his fellow students at Cornell University. Following his graduation, Mr. Wood reportedly restored the Jaguar and retained it for approximately 30 years. In the late 1990s, the SS 100 was sold to Gary Ford, who undertook some cosmetic refurbishment and then presented the car at the 2002 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, winning First in Class. Acquired a couple of years later by well-known British car expert Brian Classic, the Jaguar was sold in 2004 to John Hewitt Murphy of Santa Fe. Mr. Murphy undertook further restoration measures, commissioning a reupholstering of the seats and door panels, and a complete detailing of the engine compartment. This work contributed to further accolades at regional events, including class wins at the 2005 Radnor Hunt Concours d’Elegance and the 2010 Santa Fe Concorso, and Prewar Class Champion at the 2007 JCNA National Concours. In 2012, the Jaguar was sold to a discerning private collector, and he exhibited the car at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance® in August 2015, winning First in Class. Finished in dark green with brown leather upholstery, and still presenting beautifully with its Brooklands windscreens and painted wire wheels, this SS 100 is a genuine example of an important prewar Jaguar model. The consignor reports that the car retains its original 2 1/2-litre engine and the sale is accompanied by an original 1937 owner’s manual, weather equipment, and a tool kit. One of only 198 built, this beautifully maintained SS 100 2 1/2 Litre is eligible for many of the finest international events, from prestigious concours d’elegance to rallies such as the Mille Miglia and the Colorado Grand. Those with an appreciation of fine prewar automobiles should not miss this rare opportunity to acquire a truly exceptional example of the first great Jaguar sports car. Read more

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1941 Chrysler Royal Town and Country 'Barrelback'

PROVENANCE Henry Shipley, Middlesex, New Jersey (acquired by the late 1960s) Jim Kafka, Toms River, New Jersey (acquired from the above in the mid-1970s) Private Collector (acquired from the above circa 2010) Denny Harms, Poplar Grove, Illinois (acquired from the above) Current Owner (acquired from the above) THIS CAR This stunning Newport Blue Chrysler Royal Town and Country “Barrelback” is one of 996 such wagons produced for 1941. Today, only 24 of these magnificent, hand-built automobiles are known to survive, according to Harold Mermel, president of the Town and Country chapter of the National Woodie Club, who has been tracking each of the known examples for over 50 years. In the late 1930s, the Chrysler Corporation was in search of a glamorous new vehicle to draw attention to its brand. Chrysler designer Arnott “Buzz” Grisinger responded with plans for the Town and Country. A woodie with the appearance of a stylish and thoroughly modern sedan, the Town and Country was a total departure from the wood-bodied offerings of other manufacturers. It featured a long, sloping roofline ending in rounded clamshell rear doors, which earned the model its nickname: “Barrelback.” The Barrelback’s steel components were produced by Briggs Manufacturing Company and showcased an all-steel, fastback-style roof, an element never before seen on a wagon. Wood body components were supplied by Pekin Wood Products Company; structural members were of sturdy white ash, while the beautifully contrasting insert panels consisted of Honduran mahogany. The cars were hand-assembled at Chrysler’s Jefferson Avenue Assembly Plant in Detroit. With a sumptuous leather interior, striking Art Deco detail, and beautifully conceived brightwork throughout, the Barrelback was available in either sixor nine-passenger versions. The car on offer was purchased from a large collection in Pennsylvania, where it had been stored for many years in unrestored condition. Harms Distinctive Restorations in Poplar Grove, Illinois, renowned for its remarkable Town and Country restorations, was selected to return the car to its former glory. The Barrelback was completely disassembled, researched, and documented to ensure concours-level authenticity. The engine and all mechanicals were rebuilt, and a new wiring harness was installed. The steel body was prepared and painted in correct Newport Blue using single-stage enamel for an authentic appearance, and every fastener was returned to a pristine finish. Reproducing the exquisite white ash and Honduran mahogany elements took more than 18 months, as craftsmen painstakingly matched the wood grain across the convex and concave surfaces of the body. Fresh red leather seating and brown hog’s hair carpeting were complemented by meticulously restored mottled plastic and brightwork details. The car’s chrome was expertly replated and its delicate emblems received new cloisonné. In all ways, it is a spectacular restoration. Not shown since its completion, this 1941 Chrysler Royal Town and Country Barrelback is likely to be welcomed at high-level concours. In addition, its vault-like solidity, abundant room for passengers and luggage, rebuilt mechanicals, and delightful Vacamatic semiautomatic transmission would make this car an absolute pleasure to drive, tour, and enjoy. Read more

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1965 Ducati 250 Mach 1

In the 1950s, Ducati’s single-cylinder road and competition motorcycles established the small Bologna company as a world-class manufacturer. Famed engineer Fabio Taglioni was hired in 1954 to develop a motorcycle to win the Motogiro d’Italia, and his Gran Sport did just that, featuring the first iteration of his famous bevel-drive overhead cam design. In the 1960s, the 250 Mach 1 model was one of the fastest 250 cc motorcycles of its day, with a top speed in excess of 100 mph. A high-performance engine, five-speed gearbox, and sporting ergonomics meant the Mach 1 was coveted by enthusiasts. This outstanding example’s known history begins in 1976 with Ron Tittensor of Bellingham, Washington. Mr. Tittensor was a collector of important Ducati singles, including twin-cam Grand Prix factory race bikes. According to the consignor, Mr. Tittensor restored this Mach 1 himself, sourcing many rare NOS parts, including correct shocks, gauges, and clip-ons. The consignor purchased the Mach 1 from Mr. Tittensor in 2011, adding it to his own extraordinary Ducati collection. Considered the rarest of the 250 sporting singles, correctly restored Mach 1s are difficult to find. This example is exceptional, having lived in significant Ducati collections for the past 40 years. It is an ideal acquisition for the discerning collector or the casual enthusiast interested in artful engineering and 1960s Italian design. Read more

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1907 Wolfe Five-Passenger Touring

Wolfe automobiles were produced in Minnesota by the H.E. Wilcox Motor Car Company from 1907 to 1909. This rare example is one of only 30 Wolfe cars believed to have been made in 1907, and it retailed new for the lofty sum of $1,800. This lovely Wolfe touring car has been treated to an extensive, high-quality restoration. Jim Holcomb, then chief mechanic at the executive garage at GM headquarters, spent five years on the project, which was completed in 2010. The Wolfe was driven sparingly for the next few years before being placed in dry storage until recently, when it was brought back to running condition once again. Further mechanical sorting may be necessary before serious use. Restoration attention to detail is present in the Wolfe’s gleaming brass radiator shell, its headlights and fixtures, and its glossy red paint. The 24 hp, four-cylinder engine is powerful for the era, making the Wolfe an excellent candidate for horseless carriage tours with room enough to accommodate the driver and four companions. The proceeds of this sale will go to benefit cancer research at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Harry Pearce, former vice chairman of General Motors, donated the Wolfe to the center to recognize and support the facility’s cutting-edge research to better prevent, detect, and treat cancer. Mr. Pearce also sought to honor his treating physician at the center, Dr. Fred Appelbaum. Read more

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Gooding & Co.
Gooding & Co.
1517 20th Street
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