Gooding & Company

Gooding and Co. is considered the leading automotive auction house in the world not only due to its vast global connections and buyers, but also to the professional and high quality personal service its automotive and marketing experts offer to customers. Gooding and Co. make sure to build strong relationships with their automobile vendors in order to satisfy future desires for their cars. 

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Objects "Gooding & Company"

2007 Porsche 997 GT3 RSR

PROVENANCE Rudi Penders, Tongeren, Belgium (acquired new in 2007) Private Collector, Florida (acquired circa 2009) Current Owner (acquired from the above) RACE HISTORY 24 Hours of Le Mans, June 2007, Penders/Lamot (DNA) 2 Hours of Monza, June 2007, Penders/Lamot, No. 60 (8th in Class) FIA GT Test at Spa-Francorchamps, July 2007, Penders/Lamot/Couwberghs, No. 60 (3rd in Class) 24 Hours of Spa, July 2007, Couwberghs/Penders/Lamot/Duval, No. 60 (DNF) 1000 Kilometers of Spa, August 2007, Penders/Lamot/Couwberghs, No. 80 (9th in Class) 2 Hours of Zolder, October 2007, Basseng/Leib, No. 60 (8th in Class) THIS CAR Since 1973, Porsche’s RSR has been a powerful force in production-based GT racing worldwide. The RSR dominated the 1973 GT racing world, beating full-blown prototypes at the final running of the Targa Florio, as well as winning the 24 Hours of Daytona in the hands of the Florida-based Brumos Racing team. Since then, the RSR has won numerous titles in international GT racing and continues to be one of the cornerstones of Porsche’s motorsport efforts. Based on the 997 GT3 RS, the 997 GT3 RSR was 10% stiffer than its predecessor, featured a wider track and a more efficient aerodynamic package than the 996 RSR. These changes, among many others, meant that the 997 GT3 RSR was extremely successful in the FIA GT2 category and eventually took the 2009 FIA GT Championship title. This excellent example, one of only 35 RSRs built for 2007, was sold new to Belgian team Prospeed Competition, led by endurance racing veteran Rudi Penders. Prospeed had a history of racing success, with Penders winning the GT2 division of the Belcar Endurance Championship in 2002, 2005, and 2006, along with co-drivers Marc Goossens and Franz Lamot. In 2005, Penders won his class in the 24 Hours of Spa and fulfilled a further ambition by winning the 2009 24 Hours of Zolder. This RSR was campaigned in 2007 by Prospeed and driven by Penders and Lamot at the 2 Hours of Monza, where it finished 8th in the GT2 class. Penders, Lamot, and Bart Couwberghs then finished 3rd in the GT2 class at the FIA GT Test at Spa-Francorchamps. The RSR ultimately ran the 24 Hours of Spa but failed to finish. The team had better luck at the 1000 Kilometers of Spa, finishing 9th in the GT2 class. Driven by Marc Basseng and Marc Lieb, the RSR then finished 8th in the GT2 class at the 2 Hours of Zolder. After its competition career, the RSR was sold to a Florida-based Porsche enthusiast, and then it was acquired several years ago by the consignor, a discerning Porsche race car collector who had been searching for a great example. The consignor had Porsche racing specialists Alex Job Racing, five-time GT Championship winners, go through the car, and it has seen little track time since, having only been used for private test sessions. Today, the RSR is an ideal candidate for events such as the Classic 24 Hour at Daytona, Classic Sebring, and Rennsport Reunion. The 997 GT3 RSR continued the RSR model’s legacy of unbeatable performance and reliability, making it one of the most effective production-based endurance cars of its era. This example, with its solid international racing record, its care in the hands of Alex Job Racing, and its current ownership by a prominent American collector, offers a rare opportunity for the astute Porsche enthusiast that should not be missed.Read more

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1966 Ferrari Dino Berlinetta GT

PROVENANCE Tullio Lombardo, Napoli, Italy (acquired new in 1967) Charles Betz and Fred Peters, Orange, California (acquired from the above in 1968) Harold Austin (acquired from the above circa 1968) Dr. Eli Mishuck, Arcadia, California (acquired from the above circa 1969) Carle C. Conway III, Naples, New York (acquired from the above in 1970) David Cohen, West Vancouver, Canada (acquired from the above in 1986) Michael Sheehan, Costa Mesa, California (acquired from the above in 1993) Current Owner (acquired from the above in 1993) EXHIBITED Torino Motor Show, Torino, Italy, November 1966 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance®, Pebble Beach, California, August 1993 LITERATURE Angelo Tito Anselmi, Le Ferrari di Pininfarina, pictured on pp. 328–329 Gianni Rogliatti, Ferrari & Pininfarina, pictured on p. 126 Michael Frostick, Pininfarina: Architect of Cars, pictured on p. 81 Doug Nye, Dino: The Little Ferrari, pictured on p. 253 Antoine Prunet, The Ferrari Legend: The Road Cars, pictured on p. 363 Jean-Pierre Gabriel, Dino: Les Autres Ferrari, pictured on p. 225 Matthias Bartz, The Dino Compendium, pictured and discussed Stan Grayson, Ferrari: The Man, The Machines, pictured on p. 301 THIS CAR Alfredino “Dino” Ferrari, Enzo Ferrari’s first son, had a profound, lasting impact on the future of his father’s company. In the mid-1950s, Alfredino, along with engineer Vittorio Jano, persuaded Enzo Ferrari to develop a line of Grand Prix cars with V-6 engines. Unveiled in 1957, less than a year after Dino’s death at age 24, the 246 Grand Prix was an immediate success. Not only was it the first V-6-powered car to win a Formula 1 race, it was among the last of the winning front-engine cars, carrying Mike Hawthorn to the World Drivers’ Championship and Ferrari to 2nd Place in the Manufacturers’ Championship. In 1961, the V-6-powered 156 F1, Ferrari’s first mid-engine Grand Prix car, won the International Cup for Manufacturers. Consequently, the first mid-engine Ferrari sports prototype – the 246 SP – was built around a Grand Prix-derived 2.4-liter V-6. In early 1965, Carrozzeria Pininfarina began to develop concepts for a road-going Ferrari Dino, based on a new two-liter V-6 engine built in collaboration with Fiat. Sergio Pininfarina and Leonardo Fioravanti quickly settled on a mid-engine arrangement, taking their inspiration from Ferrari’s contemporary Dino sports racing prototypes. A mid-engine placement would also distinguish the Ferrari Dino from the new Fiat Dino – a front-engine GT. In May 1965, Pininfarina designer Aldo Brovarone produced a sketch that would serve as the basis for the Ferrari Dino – a short-wheelbase, two-seat coupe, with aerodynamic lines and beautiful, rounded-front fenders. Pininfarina’s first prototype, known as the Dino Berlinetta Speciale, was unveiled at the Paris Auto Salon in October 1965. Built on a Tipo 585 competition chassis, numbered 0840, the magnificent Berlinetta Speciale was truly a sight to behold, though it made few concessions to roadability. It was impossibly low, had minimal interior space, and did not run. After the Paris Salon, Pininfarina continued to develop a Dino concept that was more likely to be used in production. Its efforts resulted in the car presented here, the Dino Berlinetta GT. Constructed in 1966, the Dino Berlinetta GT was the first mid-engine, six-cylinder Ferrari designed – from the outset – for use as a road car. Using a Tipo 599 chassis as its foundation, Pininfarina created a stunning new design that combined the principle characteristics of the original Dino Berlinetta Speciale with the new three-seater 365 P Berlinetta Speciale, also developed in 1966. Certain elements of the design were carried over from these two Pininfarina concepts, such as the sharp crease that ran the length of the body and the long one-piece engine lid hinged at the trailing edge of the roof panel, just aft of the passenger compartment. Other features forecast the look of future Ferraris. For example, the section of curved glass behind the passenger compartment was brought into production with the Dino 206 GT, and the rectangular taillight assemblies, each with three small circular lights, were later seen on Ferrari’s 365 GT 2+2 and 365 GT4 Berlinetta Boxer. A state-of-the-art design for its era, the Dino Berlinetta GT was unmistakably the work of Pininfarina and featured iconic Ferrari design cues such as the traditional oval-shaped grille and covered headlamps. Even the extraordinary flying buttresses, which seamlessly rise up from the tail to form the roof section, recall some of the great custom-bodied Ferraris of the mid-1950s. The one-off Ferrari was finished with a Dino badge on the nose, Dino GT lettering on the tail, and the classic Pininfarina “crown” placed on each side, just ahead of the rear wheels. Painted in vibrant Fly Yellow, the Dino Berlinetta GT showcased many unique features, each demonstrating Pininfarina’s mastery of and attention to detail. Unlike the Berlinetta Speciale, the Berlinetta GT was conceived as a fully functioning automobile, suitable for customer use. As such, the cockpit layout was a major element of the design, and it was beautifully finished with a classic three-spoke Nardi steering wheel, complete instrumentation, and black leather upholstery, highlighted by blue cloth trim on the seat cushions and door panels. Although designed as a road-going sports car, the Dino Berlinetta GT did possess a number of important details that speak to its motorsport origins. Its engine, a production Tipo 135B two-liter V-6, was mounted longitudinally, as in the contemporary 206 S racing car. Similarly, exterior features, such as the outside fuel filler, five-spoke cast-aluminum Campagnolo wheels, Firestone tires, and large single windscreen wiper, were features seen on Ferrari’s contemporary sports racing and Formula 1 cars. Finished in October 1966, the Dino Berlinetta GT was presented on the Ferrari stand at the Torino Motor Show in November and marked a major turning point in the company’s history. Although Pininfarina’s Berlinetta GT represented a considerable advancement toward a production-ready Dino, Enzo Ferrari demanded that a major change be made before the design was finalized. He tasked the project’s lead engineer, Angelo Bellei, with mounting the engine transversely rather than longitudinally. In 1967, Ferrari unveiled its production Dino, the 206 GT, which was built on a Tipo 607 chassis with its two-liter V-6 mounted transversely, as Il Commendatore wished. According to the research of historian Marcel Massini, Ferrari officially completed the Dino Berlinetta GT on December 1, 1966. In 1967, the one-off car was assigned a production 206 GT chassis number, 00106, and was sold to its first private owner, Tullio Lombardo of Napoli, Italy. Sig. Lombardo kept the car until 1968, when it was sold to well-known Ferrari enthusiasts Charles Betz and Fred Peters of Orange, California. Mr. Betz and Mr. Peters sold the car to Harold Austin, who in turn sold it to Dr. Eli Mishuck of Arcadia, California. In 1970, Carle C. Conway III of New York purchased 00106 from Dr. Mishuck. An avid car enthusiast, Mr. Conway served as president of the Ferrari Club of America from 1979 to 1983 and owned several significant classic Ferraris, including the 412 MI, a 312 P, and two 250 GTOs. During his ownership, the Dino was repainted silver gray and pictured in several books, including Stan Grayson’s Ferrari: The Man, The Machines and Jean-Pierre Gabriel’s Dino: Les Autres Ferrari (The Other Ferrari). Mr. Conway kept 00106 until 1986, when it was sold to noted collector David Cohen. Mr. Cohen shipped the Dino to his home in South Africa, enjoyed the car on several rallies, and then brought it with him when he moved to West Vancouver, British Columbia. In early 1993, he sold 00106 to Southern California Ferrari specialist Michael Sheehan, who then restored the Berlinetta GT and presented it at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance® that August. For the past 25 years, this Ferrari has been a crown jewel in one of the most impressive private collections of postwar Italian sports cars ever assembled. While currently in running condition, and having just been serviced by the Ferrari specialists at Motion Products in Wisconsin, the Dino will need additional attention before road use. This exceptional car has been featured in countless books and articles on Ferrari, Pininfarina, and the Dino model, and yet remains just as mesmerizing today as it did upon its debut at the Torino Motor Show in November 1966. A one-of-a-kind Dino prototype, designed and built by Carrozzeria Pininfarina, one of the most successful and influential Italian coachbuilders, 00106 is a world-class automobile that possesses every special quality sought after by discerning collectors. Leading marque experts and historians have professed their admiration for this historically significant, landmark Ferrari prototype, which served as the template for one of the most revered production models in the company’s history. By any standard, the Dino Berlinetta GT is a significant coachbuilt Ferrari. It is the prototypical mid-engine GT from Maranello and one of the most enduring sports car designs of the 1960s. Gooding & Company is proud to present this magnificent automobile at public auction for the first time in its history.Read more

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  • 2d 1h

1978 BMW 633 CSi

In the 1970s, BMW engineers wanted to build light, fast sporting machines, while management sought to produce large Autobahn bruisers to compete with Mercedes-Benz. Around that time, revered French designer Paul Bracq was hired away from Mercedes-Benz. He was able to bridge the gap between the two BMW factions by penning the fantastic 6-Series coupe. A spacious, comfortable road car, it appealed to management’s desire for a large grand tourer. Quick and competent, with taut lines reminiscent of the 3.0 CS, it pleased BMW’s engineers as well. Built in rarely seen Amazonitgrün Metallic (Amazon Green Metallic) with Farngrün (Fern Green) leather interior, this well-optioned numbers-matching German-market 633 CSi received upgrades in period from Alpina Burkard Bovensiepen, including front and rear spoilers, wheels, steering wheel, and shift knob. In 1984, a collector imported the BMW into the US, preserving and cherishing it for more than 30 years. Included with the sale is a notebook meticulously documenting services and fuel stops throughout his stewardship. This 1978 BMW 633 CSi is a stunningly preserved original car. Still contemporary 40 years after its birth, it is a testament to Bracq’s brilliant design and BMW’s legendary build quality. Well documented and reported by the consignor to retain much of its original finish, this CSi presents as an outstanding preservation-class candidate as well as a superior classic German grand tourer.Read more

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2016 Porsche 991 GT3 RS

The letters “RS” attached to a Porsche 911’s moniker have long indicated a special, racing-oriented version with high-performance hardware. Introduced for 2015, the 991-generation 911 GT3 RS continued that theme, featuring unique front-fender louvers, rear-quarter air intakes, and an adjustable rear wing. The use of carbon fiber for the fenders, engine cover, and trunk lid, along with a magnesium roof reduced curb weight, while the 911’s performance envelope was pushed even further via a 500 hp, naturally aspirated flat six teamed up with a seven-speed, dual-clutch automatic gearbox. Wearing striking Ultraviolet paint and fitted with black seats upholstered in leather and Alcantara highlighted with silver stitching, this 991 GT3 RS is a virtual time capsule car, displaying just 53 miles at the time of cataloguing. Further adding to its allure are a number of desirable options, including LED headlights, carbon ceramic brakes, front-axle lift system, an extended range fuel tank, and aluminum pedals. Offered by way of a significant private collection, this one-owner GT3 RS shows fastidious care and comes complete with books, CARFAX Vehicle History Report, and a Porsche Certificate of Authenticity. Presenting in pristine condition and equipped with many desirable options, this 991 GT3 RS merits serious consideration from even the most discerning enthusiast.Read more

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  • 2d 1h

1930 Packard 734 Speedster Phaeton

PROVENANCE First Owner, Illinois (acquired new in 1930) D. Cameron Peck, Chicago, Illinois (acquired circa 1947) Wally Marsh, Cleveland, Ohio (acquired from the above in 1952) Dr. Charles W. Marsh, Longview, Texas (acquired from the above in 1958) Patrick Ferchill, Fort Worth, Texas (acquired from the above circa 1960) Knox Kershaw, Montgomery, Alabama (acquired from the above in 1996) Current Owner (acquired from the above in 2012) EXHIBITED Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance®, Pebble Beach, California, August 2001 (Third in Class) Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, Amelia Island, Florida (First in Class) CCCA Grand Classic, 2001 (First Place, 100 Points) LITERATURE Smith Hempstone Oliver, The Bulb Horn, Fall 1958, discussed on p. 5 THIS CAR In 1930, just as Detroit was in the midst of an escalating horsepower race, Packard unveiled its prototypical factory “hot rod,” the 734 Speedster. The extremely limited-production model featured incredible performance statistics, and its radical proportions make it one of the finest sporting machines built by an American manufacturer during the Classic Era. Never a mainstream advertised model, fewer than 120 were built. Based upon a modified, rigid boxed chassis with a short 134.5" wheelbase, the 734 Speedster was equipped with 19" wheels, a high-speed rear-axle ratio, special finned brake drums with three leading shoe linings, and a highly tuned 385 cid straight eight. With nine main bearings, a special two-barrel Detroit Lubricator carburetor, hemispherical combustion chambers, and a special cylinder head and exhaust manifold, the 734 Speedsters produced a stout 145 bhp. Over the course of production, the 734 Speedster was offered in five distinct body styles: boattail runabout, phaeton, victoria, sedan, and roadster. Custom-tailored to the unique dimensions of the high-performance chassis, the low, narrow speedster bodies were built in Packard’s own custom coachworks. This work resulted in some of the most rakish Packard automobiles of all time, with design excellence on a par with the Dietrich Individual Customs that would soon follow. Thanks to its lightweight coachwork, reworked chassis, and high-performance engine, the 734 Speedster offered 60 mph performance in second gear and achieved road speeds in excess of 100 mph. These figures were nearly unheard of for a production automobile in 1930, much less from a fully outfitted luxury car. The Packard presented here is one of the magnificent Model 734 Speedster Phaetons, of which just 32 examples were built. This outstanding Speedster Phaeton, one of only five known to survive, is a well-known and highly regarded example of this rare breed of sporting Packards. Delivered new to Hubbard Woods Packard of Winnetka, Illinois, this 734 Speedster Phaeton, body no. 445-12, was sold to its first owner on May 13, 1930. Although little is known of the Packard’s earliest history, it is believed that the car remained in the Chicago area throughout the 1930s and 1940s. Following WWII, pioneering classic car enthusiast D. Cameron Peck acquired the rare 734 Speedster Phaeton for his incomparable collection. Mr. Peck would come to own nearly 1,500 of the world’s finest automotive treasures – ranging from early French antiques to unusual American classics. For decades, Mr. Peck’s comprehensive catalogue of automobiles remained the standard by which all other collections were judged. When a portion of The Peck Collection was auctioned in 1952, the Packard 734 Speedster Phaeton was sold to Wally Marsh, a resident of Cleveland. According to Smith Hempstone Oliver’s article published in the fall 1958 issue of The Bulb Horn, Mr. Marsh’s 734 Speedster Phaeton was described as “completely restored to new condition” before both he and the Packard relocated to Texas. In 1958, Dr. Charles W. Marsh of Longview, Texas, purchased the 734 Speedster; less than a year later, he sold it to Patrick Ferchill of Fort Worth, Texas. Throughout the 1960s, Mr. Ferchill enjoyed the outstanding qualities of his rare, high-performance Packard and participated in several classic car tours. Finally, in 1996, after nearly a decade of negotiating, Mr. Ferchill sold his prized 734 in largely preserved, unrestored condition to longtime acquaintance Knox Kershaw, a lifelong collector of important Classics. After some initial restoration work was undertaken in Mr. Kershaw’s shop, the Packard’s comprehensive restoration was entrusted to D&D Classic Automobile Restoration in Covington, Ohio. Throughout the process, factory photos were used to guide details, and experts, including Clay Cook Enterprises, were called in for specialty work. Restored from the ground up, the Speedster Phaeton was finished in an elegant two-tone gray color scheme with contrasting dark blue leather upholstery. Faithful to Packard’s original concept for the model, the Phaeton has not been over-accessorized, sporting neither driving nor cowl lights, and is simply outfitted with a polished radiator stone guard and a Goddess of Speed mascot. The beautifully restored 734 Speedster Phaeton made its exhibition debut at the 2001 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance®, where it earned Third in Class. An award for First in Class at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance followed, then a First Prize in CCCA competition, achieving a perfect 100-point score. In 2012, the 734 was acquired by the consignor to include it in his stable of other notable exotic machinery. During his tenure with the high-performance Packard, the current owner has taken the 734 Speedster on an 800-mile tour in the high elevation around Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and he has kept it in an optimal state of tune. Supporting the unique history and provenance of this special Packard is a comprehensive history file that includes extensive restoration documents, various correspondence, and copies of period literature. Outstanding examples can be found only in the world’s finest collections, and the roster of past and present 734 Speedster owners is virtually synonymous with the history of classic-car collecting. Less than 120 examples of 734 Speedsters of all styles were built, with fewer than 30 in existence today; of this number, very few are as correct and authentic as this splendid Phaeton. Not only is this 734 Speedster a rare and sought-after American classic, its limited ownership, superb presentation, and connection to D. Cameron Peck – one of the most revered early car collectors – speak to its credibility and timeless appeal. In consideration of its outstanding qualities and extreme rarity, this 734 Speedster Phaeton is an ideal prewar Classic for those who appreciate quality, elegance, exclusivity, design, and performance.Read more

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1977 Porsche 911 Targa

By 1977, Porsche realized that their clientele demanded more than just spartan sports cars and began to offer options that would deliver refinement and creature comforts alongside performance. The growing options list let 911 owners greatly personalize their cars, as evidenced by the example offered here. According to its Porsche Certificate of Authenticity, this car was ordered with front and rear stabilizer bars, Blaupunkt Bamberg radio, five-speed gearbox, rear deck-lid emblem delete, leather steering wheel, tinted glass, center console, and California emissions package. The Black Watch is the name of the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland, but it’s also the moniker given this outlaw-styled Porsche 911, which proudly wears the blue and green tartan pattern of the famed military organization. Ordered new from the factory with the striking plaid seat inserts and Ice Green Metallic paint, the Black Watch 911 is a daring take on a 1977 Targa. This distinctive 911’s restoration is documented in a glossy coffee table book, which is included in the sale along with a matching set of tartan luggage. The car is kept in a climate-controlled collection and has very recently received an oil and filter service, transmission oil change, and brake fluid flush. This example offers a completely unique vision of the popular Targa-roofed 911 in a very tidy and attractive package.Read more

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1960 Chevrolet 283/270 Corvette Roadster

The Corvette, introduced in 1953, soon earned the moniker “America’s sports car.” The Corvette had an enduring effect on the automotive landscape and has become among the most cherished and collected American cars of the era. The 1960 edition, represented by the car offered here, was the result of an evolution of power increases, styling changes, and motor sport successes. This gorgeous example has been a pampered show car for over 35 years, receiving five NCRS Top Flight awards, starting in 1992. Most recently, in June 2017, it received the prestigious and highly coveted NCRS Bloomington Gold certification. The Corvette is beautifully finished in Ermine White with contrasting silver coves, complemented by a black interior. It is equipped with the desirable 283 cid, 270 hp engine, which featured an aluminum radiator and Duntov high-lift cam, and its engine number matches that of the car’s chassis number. It is fitted with a four-speed manual gearbox and Wonder Bar radio, and is accompanied by a cockpit cover, which was an optional dealer accessory. A list of casting codes and ownership history provided by the consignor also accompanies the sale, along with NCRS judging sheets and the Bloomington Gold Certificate. Possessing an impressive combination of stunning good looks and award-winning show history, this Corvette is an ideal choice for Corvette and other shows, plus vintage sports car rallies.Read more

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  • 2d 1h

1955 Porsche 550 Spyder

PROVENANCE Eldon C. Beagle, Sacramento, California (acquired new via Oxford Motors in June 1955) Oakland Diesel Distributors Inc., Emeryville, California (acquired by 1967) Jim and Mary Richeimer, Columbus, Ohio (acquired circa 1971) Jim Meehan, Columbus, Ohio (acquired circa 1977) Chris Swatta, Annapolis, Maryland (acquired from the above in 1977) Lewis Markoff, Bethesda, Maryland (acquired from the above in 1986) Benjamin Edwards, Prospect, Connecticut (acquired from the above circa 1998) Current Owner (acquired from the above via Paul Russell and Company in 1999) RACE HISTORY All races listed below driven by Eldon C. Beagle. Sacramento National Sports Car Road Race, Sacramento, California, October 1955, No. 12F (4th in Class) Stockton Sports Car Races, Stockton, California, March 1956, No. 12F (2nd in Class) Pebble Beach National Championship Sports Car Road Races, Pebble Beach, California, April 1956, No. 12F (9th in Class) Rose Festival Sports Car Road Races, Santa Rosa, California, May 1956, No. 12F (3rd in Class) Rose Festival Sports Car Road Races, Santa Rosa, California, May 1956, No. 12F (6th in Class) Great Salt Lake Road Races, Salt Lake City, Utah, June 1956, No. 12F (2nd in Class) Great Salt Lake Road Races, Salt Lake City, Utah, June 1956, No. 12F (3rd in Class) Buchanan Field Race, Pacheco, California, July 1956, No. 12F (7th in Class) Buchanan Field Race, Pacheco, California, July 1956, No. 12F (3rd in Class) Santa Maria Road Races, Santa Maria, California, July 1956, No. 12F (3rd in Class) Santa Maria Road Races, Santa Maria, California, July 1956, No. 12F (DNF) Santa Maria Road Races, Santa Maria, California, July 1956, No. 12F (10th in Class) Redwood Empire Sports Car Road Races, Arcata, California, August 1956, No. 12F (3rd in Class) Redwood Empire Sports Car Road Races, Arcata, California, August 1956, No. 12F (2nd in Class) LITERATURE Rolf Sprenger and Steve Heinrichs, Carrera, chassis no. listed on p. 353 THIS CAR By 1953, Porsche had been successful racing its 356, but understood it would need a true purpose-built race car to compete at motorsport’s highest levels. The resulting designs, the 550 Spyder, and its successors the 550A and 718, became some of history’s most important race cars, scoring not only class victories but significant overall wins. At just over 1,200 pounds, the 550 Spyder was incredibly agile and its advanced four-cam engine meant it was quite powerful relative to its weight. The design’s brilliance was apparent from 550-001’s very first race, when Helmut Glöckler proved victorious after fighting unrelenting rain in his methanol-fueled Spyder at Nürburgring in 1953. That same year, 550-001 and 002 took significant class victories at Le Mans, the Carrera Panamericana, and the Buenos Aires 1000 Km. This 550 Spyder, chassis 550-0053, is a remarkable example with a fascinating and well-documented history. A 1955 letter to Eldon C. Beagle of Sacramento, California, from John von Neumann’s Competition Motors of Hollywood illuminates its original delivery details: “Dear Mr. Beagle: Your Porsche Spyder is scheduled to dock this weekend in Los Angeles harbor. The serial number of your car is #550-0053, the engine number is #P90049, the color of the car is silver with red upholstery. The car is equipped with a full double windshield.” Beagle grew up in Merced, California, the son of a miner-turned-car dealer. He studied engineering at Caltech and Stanford, but his college days were interrupted by WWII, and he served as an aircraft mechanic in Italy, where he relished organizing high-speed test flights. After the war, Beagle returned to California, starting a family as well as a successful agricultural supply business. He eventually acquired a spacious home in Sacramento and the 550 Spyder offered here. As documented by its accompanying 1955 Bill of Sale, Beagle paid $6,430 for the new Porsche, which was retailed to him through local dealership Oxford Motors. It was the first in a line of Porsche racing Spyders that Beagle owned and campaigned with great success on the West Coast and in the Bahamas. According to his family’s archival book, The Car Years – The Racing Life of Eldon C. Beagle, Beagle drove 550-0053 in 14 races from 1955-1956. In his first race at Sacramento in 1955, he started on the front row next to von Neumann and finished 4th in Class. In 1956 races, his notable class results in 0053 included a 2nd Place at Stockton, California, 2nd and 3rd at Salt Lake City, a 3rd at Buchanan Field, 3rd at Santa Maria, and 2nd and 3rd at Arcata. According to the book, Beagle finished on the podium in 0053 in eight of the 14 races he entered. He retired only once, and the results demonstrate the car’s speed and reliability as well as Beagle’s driving prowess, which he honed in competition with such noted drivers as Lance Reventlow, Rod Carveth, and Pete Lovely. Numerous stunning original photos of these races from 1956 accompany the sale and document Beagle racing through the Del Monte Forest at the 1956 Pebble Beach Road Races. In addition, video accompanies the sale and affords a rare view of the car in action in period. An e-mail included in the car’s history file from Eldon’s oldest son, Alan, fondly recalls his father and 0053: “My memories of my father’s first Spyder mostly concern the simple way that sports car racing was practiced in the mid-’50s. When Dad had the Spyder in ’55, I was seven years old. Saturday morning early, when it was still dark, Dad would put on a really heavy big brown parka, and I would put on some really warm clothes. We would then drive the Porsche to the race track, often about an hour-plus drive. It was really cold, and I would squeeze into the passenger seat under the silver painted tonneau cover surrounded by blankets, and we would take off. I remember the engine noise right behind me as though it was yesterday morning. When we got close to the track, my dad would pull over, tell me that we were almost there, and to use the blankets to make myself inconspicuous… and we would drive past the person controlling entrance to the track. With my large dad in the driver’s seat, I was invisible. The idea was to get through the entrance gate and to the pit area, where I understood kids my age weren’t permitted. When we got there, I would carefully exit the Spyder so not to be seen by officials, and, until the temperature warmed up, sit in the passenger car.” The elder Beagle was a meticulous driver, as records indicate only one retirement in his entire career, and his sons don’t recall 0053 being in any kind of major accident. By September 1956, Mr. Beagle was no longer racing 0053 but running 550 Spyder chassis 0088. The next stage of 0053’s life was recently illuminated by a conversation with Porsche historian Jim Perrin, who recalled that his friends Jim and Mary Richeimer of Columbus purchased 0053 around 1971 from Porsche racer Carl Block, who had worked on 0053 in 1955. The Richeimers, owners of 550-0067, heard of 0053’s availability and hooked up a rickety old trailer to their Datsun station wagon, heading to Berkeley, California, to the shop of 356 racers Richie Lukes and Harry Shoreman. When the Richeimers found 0053, its nose had been pushed in and the paint was partially stripped off, but it otherwise appeared complete and original. The Richeimers, collectors of four-cam Porsches, stored the car for some years and sold it to Jim Meehan, who then sold it in 1977 to Chris Swatta of Annapolis, Maryland, who also owned a Carrera Abarth GTL. Mr. Swatta also kept 0053 in storage, selling it in about 1986 to Lewis Markoff of Bethesda, Maryland, a meticulous enthusiast who embarked on a complete restoration with local experts. Porsche specialist Matt De Maria oversaw the restoration, did assembly and disassembly work, and rebuilt the gearbox. When De Maria received it, 0053 was largely untouched with its faded original silver paint and patinated interior, and complete with its orginal leather spare tire strap and racing windscreen. Bill Doyle, a renowned four-cam expert, rebuilt the engine, and metalworking specialist Tom Selby completed the bodywork, making some repairs to the nose. Local expert Joe Schiavone painted the car, North Hollywood Speedometer restored the instruments, and the interior was redone by a local specialist. After its completion, Mr. Markoff drove 0053 every few weeks, but, realizing the limitations of the roads around Maryland, decided to sell it. His ad in the November 1992 edition of Autoweek stated: “Porsche 550 RS Spyder – Ex-von Neumann, CA car w/less than 9K mi. Orig. alloy body, eng. & trans. Complete, correct mechanical & cosmetic restoration. Silver/red. $359,000.” Benjamin Edwards of Connecticut purchased 0053 around 1998, and the consignor purchased it from him through Paul Russell and Company in 1999. The consignor has enjoyed it sparingly, bringing it to Doyle in 2006 for a mechanical service. For the past 19 years, 0053 has remained a part of the current owner’s focused collection of German sports cars. In spring 2018, the consignor brought the Spyder to renowned four-cam expert Jeff Adams at Speedsport Tuning in Danbury, Connecticut, after it had not been run in about five years. Adams has worked on some of the most original 550s in existence, and found 0053 to compare quite favorably in its components, purity, and correctness. Adams believes it to be one of the best 550 Spyders he has encountered, and his report on his opinions as to the car’s originality, correctness, and condition is available for review in the car’s file. Significantly, the engine and gearbox numbers match the Porsche Kardex. In addition, Adams’ work revealed that the engine internal number, 59, matches the Kardex, the heads possess matching gear train and valve cover numbers, and it features the correct side oil-port case and correct block-style Porsche lettering on the intake valve covers. The service completed for the consignor by Adams, as documented in receipts on file, totals over $30,000, and includes work to the engine, braking system, and gearbox. As with any automobile emerging from storage, additional mechanical work may be required with further use. In 1955, there was little that could compare to both the performance and innovation of a 550 Spyder. This example is an immensely desirable Porsche Spyder, and thus one of the great postwar sports cars. Its rich provenance, very rare period documentation, competition history, and genuine character make it an immensely historic automobile. Without question, 550-0053 is among the very best of an incredibly distinguished breed.Read more

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1965 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II

PROVENANCE Mr. Anthony, France (acquired new via Franco-Britannic Autos Ltd. in 1966) Bruce Dolin, Pompton Plains, New Jersey (acquired by the late 1980s) Jeffrey Barney, Los Angeles, California (acquired from the above in 1989) Steve Pomerantz, Los Angeles, California (acquired from the above by 2005) Tom Shaughnessy, Oceanside, California (acquired from the above in 2013) Current Owner (acquired from the above) THIS CAR According to a report compiled by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, this outstanding 330 GT 2+2 Series II, numbered 07761, was built in September 1965 as an original left-hand-drive example, finished in Grigio Fumo (Smoke Gray) and trimmed with dark red leather upholstery. The Ferrari was delivered new to the official French Ferrari importer Franco-Britannic Autos Ltd. in Paris, and was sold to a Mr. Anthony in early 1966. By the late 1980s, chassis 07761 came under the ownership of Bruce Dolin of Pompton Plains, New Jersey, and in 1989 it was acquired by Jeffrey Barney of Los Angeles. Mr. Barney restored 07761 and, as an enthusiastic owner of the car, he showed it many times beginning in June 1995 at the Rosso Rodeo Concours in Beverly Hills, California. That August, it earned Second in Class at the Ferrari Club of America Vintage Concours in Carmel Valley, California. In 1996, the Ferrari scored First in Class at the Huntington Beach Concours d’Elegance, and that August it took the first of eight Platinum Awards earned through 2005 under FCA national-level scrutiny. In 1997, the exterior was refinished in black, and other awards included the Cavallino Magazine 100th Issue Award, and the GT 2+2 and Coppa Bella Macchina awards at the 2001 FCA Concorso Italiano. By July 2005, the 330 GT 2+2 was under the ownership of Steve Pomerantz of Los Angeles. In 2013, it was acquired by FCA master judge Tom Shaughnessy, who had known the car personally for more than 10 years. The consignor acquired the Ferrari later in 2013 and made the bold decision to improve the car’s performance, enlisting the experts at Intrepid Motorcars in Nevada. The original engine was comprehensively rebuilt, with an increase in displacement to approximately five liters. This process was completed with no expense spared, and included Carrillo rods, JE forged pistons, and a custom crankshaft, liners, and camshafts, among many other parts. The resulting power train has completely transformed the coupe, which now has performance equal to much more contemporary machinery. Additional work by Intrepid included the rebuild and crack-testing of the suspension and a freshening of the fuel and braking systems, among other items. The resulting invoices are impressive, totaling nearly $190,000 and are evidence of the consignor’s commitment to get the car just right. This outstanding 330 GT is in first-class condition throughout and certainly one of the finest examples in existence today. It is accompanied by books and a tool kit, rounding out its presentation. The offering of 07761 at Pebble Beach presents an exceptional and highly astute classic Ferrari purchase opportunity.Read more

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1973 Porsche 911 2.4 E Targa

The Porsche 911 E offered customers a host of luxury options to complement the improved 2.4-liter fuel-injected motor. Available in either coupe or Targa form, just 2,421 examples were produced for 1973. The example on offer was delivered new to Continental Porsche of Tucson, Arizona, and spent much of its life in California. According to factory records, this E Targa came well equipped with tinted glass, Koni shock absorbers, front and rear stabilizer bars, and ATS alloy wheels. Optional driving lights were installed by the dealership. In 2012, marque specialist California Porsche Restoration in Fallbrook, California, treated this 911 Targa to a thorough nut-and-bolt restoration. The comprehensive restoration totaled over $134,000 in receipts and included a bare-metal refinish in the original Signal Yellow. The interior was equipped with desirable sport seats, trimmed with period-correct houndstooth inserts, and both motor and transaxle were removed from the car with any needed parts either reconditioned or replaced with factory-correct components. Accompanied by handbooks, tool roll, jack, spare tire, keys, registration records and service receipts, and a CD of restoration photographs, this impeccable 2.4-liter E Targa has the thorough documentation to make it a truly outstanding example of an early air-cooled Porsche 911.Read more

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2015 Porsche 918 Spyder Weissach

First shown as a concept at the 2010 Geneva Auto Show, the 918 Spyder combined classic Porsche virtues with groundbreaking technical capability. It featured an innovative hybrid drivetrain that promised otherworldly performance with high fuel efficiency and an extended battery range. The 918 Spyder prototype was met with a rapturous reception from both media and customers, and a production model debuted at the 2013 Frankfurt Auto Show, followed by a short production run of 918 examples assembled at the Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen factory. Inspired by historic Porsche racing cars, the 918’s Michael Mauer-designed bodywork was predominantly crafted from carbon fiber reinforced plastic and defined by a sloped nose, exhaust pipes exiting from the rear deck lid, and detachable roof panels that converted the cabin to open-air motoring. The driver-focused cockpit was swathed in leather, Alcantara, aluminum, and carbon fiber and dominated by a bold, flying-buttress center console. The 918’s monocoque chassis and subframe were made from CFRP for extreme torsional rigidity and lightweight construction. Featuring a double-wishbone suspension in front and a multi-link arrangement in the rear, the handling was complemented by a speed-sensitive rear-axle steering system, which improved cornering. Derived from the famed Le Mans-winning RS Spyder endurance racer, the 4.6-liter V-8 used a carbon-reinforced polymer dry sump lubrication system. It was fitted with titanium connecting rods, thin-wall castings on the crankcase and cylinder heads, a high-strength lightweight crankshaft, and a performance Inconel exhaust system. For optimal driving dynamics, the drivetrain and major components were precisely positioned within the chassis, creating a low center of gravity and mass centralization. Developing 608 hp at 8,700 rpm, the V-8 worked in tandem with two electric motors mounted to the front and rear axles. The AC motors recuperated energy from the ceramic composite disc brakes and sent it back to the battery, providing additional power. Connected to Porsche’s seven-speed Doppelkupplung (PDK) transmission, the sophisticated plug-in hybrid system combined for a total maximum output of 887 hp and 940 lbs./ft. of torque. Furthermore, the car could be run solely on electric power with a range of 19 miles. The 918 received much acclaim for its high performance and efficiency, with Porsche providing figures of 0–60 mph in 2.5 seconds, 0–120 mph in 7.2 seconds, and a top speed of 217 mph. Independent tests proved the 918 even quicker, with Car and Driver reporting 0–60 mph in just 2.2 seconds in August 2014 – the quickest car the magazine had ever tested. The example offered here, chassis 596, is one of 162 US cars equippedwith the optional Weissach Package, which is named for the Porsche R&D facility in Germany. The $84,000 package includes lightweight magnesium wheels, reduced cabin insulation, ceramic wheel bearings, titanium chassis hardware, and six-point racing harnesses. The resultant 90-pound weight savings shaved two-tenths of a second off its 0–62 mph times. Porsche used a similar Weissach 918 to break the standing lap record at the Nürburgring with a remarkable 6:57 time. Ordered new in Rhodium Silver Metallic with contrasting carbon fiber panels and Acid Green brake calipers, this 918 Weissach was also optioned with the front-axle lift system, carbon fiber floor mats, accented stripe seat belts, and custom tailoring option. It was delivered new through Park Place Porsche in Dallas. The car retains its factory-issued accessories, including the car covers, windscreen deflector wing, tow hook, first-aid kit, air compressor, battery charger, and charger mounting station. Some items are still in the original wrappers and packages. Showing only 92 miles at the time of cataloguing, this pristine example presents like new. The car is complete with its original window sticker, books, dealer service documentation, and safety recall compliance records. It has been residing in a climate-controlled private storage facility, seeing regular service, exercise, and attention from its fastidious owner. A powerhouse of innovative technology, this factory-lightweight 918 Weissach puts Porsche’s racing prowess into a beautiful Spyder body, which is destined to be remembered as a modern masterpiece. The example offered here represents a low-mile, well-optioned, and strikingly handsome car in which to experience the cutting edge of Porsche’s formidable performance engineering.Read more

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1963 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

PROVENANCE Mark and Mercedes Pollack, Tryon, North Carolina (acquired new in 1963) Ann Hallowell, Greenwich, Connecticut (acquired from the above in 1977) Current Owner (acquired from the above in 1997) EXHIBITED Deutsche Marque Concours d’Elegance, Vienna, Virginia, May 1999 (Best in Class) Radnor Hunt Concours d’Elegance, Malvern, Pennsylvania, September 2000 (Best MB Sports Car) Deutsche Marque Concours d’Elegance, Vienna, Virginia, May 2001 (Best of Marque) Greenwich Concours d’Elegance, Greenwich, Connecticut, June 2001 (Best German Sports and Touring Car) MBCA Mid-Atlantic Concours d’Elegance, July 2001 (Best of Show) Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, Amelia Island, Florida, March 2002 (First in Class) Hilton Head Island Concours d’Elegance, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, October 2003 (Car Showing Exceptional Styling for Its Era, Class Award) AACA Spring National Meet 2004, Hagerstown, Maryland (Junior Award) Meadowbrook Concours d’Elegance, Rochester Hills, Michigan, August 2004 (Class Award) York County Heritage Trust Concours d’Elegance, York, Pennsylvania, 2006 (Mercedes-Benz Trophy) Glenmoor Gathering, Akron, Ohio, September 2006 (Chairman’s Award) AACA Spring National Meet, Binghamton, New York, June 2007 (Senior Award) William K. Vanderbilt Jr. Concours d’Elegance, Newport, Rhode Island, July 2007 (Class Award) MBCA Mid-Atlantic Concours d’Elegance, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, August 2007 (Best of Show) Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance®, Pebble Beach, California, August 2011 (Class Award) St. Michaels Concours d’Elegance, Annapolis, Maryland, September 2013 (First in Class) Lime Rock Historic Festival Concours d’Elegance, Lime Rock, Connecticut, September 2015 (First in Class) LITERATURE The Star, July/August 2001, feature article Dennis Adler, The Art of the Sports Car Classic & Sports Car, March 2004 Car Collector Magazine, July 2004 300 Star Letter, September 2004, cover car Dennis Adler, Daimler & Benz: The Complete History Mercedes Enthusiast, April 2008 300 Star Letter, January/February 2012, cover car THIS CAR In March 1957, Mercedes-Benz introduced the 300 SL Roadster, employing a host of mechanical advancements and stylistic revisions to transition to a new open-top version of the successful 300 SL Coupe. Chief among these were a new rear-axle design that improved handling and a modified frame that allowed for conventionally hinged doors. These features were further complemented by the addition of disc brakes in 1961 and the implementation the next year of aluminum engine blocks, which were fitted to the final 210 examples of the Roadster. Mercedes-Benz built 1,858 Roadsters, steadily improving them mechanically until production ceased in February 1963. Only 26 Roadsters were built in 1963, and this final run represented the apogee of the 300 SL, as the ultimate and most advanced expression of the highly developed model. This striking and modestly used 300 SL is one of six examples built in February 1963. It is the fifth-from-last car assembled, and the latest-built car sold new to the American market. It has been preserved by a well-documented chain of three devoted caretakers, resulting in one of the most important and desirable Roadsters to be offered in many years. According to factory data sourced by the consignor, chassis 3254 was completed on February 4, 1963, finished in White (DB 50) and trimmed with red leather.To a great degree, the story of this Roadster is that of its first owner, Mercedes Pollack. Born in Cuba as Mercedes de la Torre y Alcoz, Mrs. Pollack was a Cuban national with ties to the old landed class of the island nation. She married Mark Pollack, the second son of a wealthy American who was one of the largest exporters of Cuban tobacco. Before the Cuban Revolution, Mr. Pollack developed a taste for fine motorcars while growing up in La Mansión, a luxurious Florentine estate commissioned by his father that has been featured in Architectural Digest and still is used by the government to house important officials. By the time of the Batista regime’s overthrow, Mr. Pollack had amassed a notable collection that included a 1924 Bugatti Type 22 Brescia, a 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing, an early 300 SL Roadster finished in white paint over a red interior, and three Ferraris. With the takeover of Cuba by Fidel Castro’s communist revolutionaries in 1959, the Pollacks fled La Mansión, leaving their car collection and subsequently taking up residency in Geneva, Switzerland, and Tryon, North Carolina. While the couple was traveling through the principality of Andorra in August 1963, Mercedes Pollack learned that the 300 SL model had recently discontinued production, and she quickly contacted the factory to express interest in purchasing a Roadster. Of the last cars assembled, four examples had been finished in White with a red interior, and Mrs. Pollack bought the last one available. Her purchase contract through the Establecimientos Pyrenees Casa Perez in Andorra shows a price of $6,500, reflecting a tremendous markdown of the general list price of $11,500. Having replaced the white over red Roadster they abandoned in Cuba, the Pollacks christened their new car La Paloma Blanca (The White Dove). After receiving the car in August 1963, they returned it to the factory for full implementation of options. It subsequently was equipped with chrome sport wheels, dual side mirrors, a Becker Grand Prix radio with Hirschmann antenna, a spotlight, factory competition seat belts, and a set of Hepco luggage. The factory fitted the trunk lid with a unique luggage rack that was paired with a piece of Karl Baisch luggage from a Gullwing. The headlamps were converted to US specifications, and the car is believed to be the only European-specified 300 SL example sold through the marque’s continental dealership network that was officially converted in this manner. When the work was completed, the Pollacks used their new Roadster to tour Europe for six months. They returned to the US by ocean liner in 1964, and La Paloma Blanca was shipped with them. The Roadster was driven steadily for two years and accrued approximately 16,000 km by 1966, when Mr. Pollack’s deteriorating vision led to the car being stored indefinitely. In 1977, the well-known dealer Ed Jurist of Nyack, New York, brokered a sale of 3254 from Mrs. Pollack to Ann Hallowell, a vintage firearms dealer residing in Greenwich, Connecticut. Well versed in collector concepts and the care of aged mechanical objects, Mrs. Hallowell and her husband fastidiously maintained the beautiful 300 SL for the next 20 years, accruing just 2,500 km during that time. In 1997, Mrs. Hallowell sold the Roadster to the consignor, a longtime 300 SL connoisseur from Maryland. Two years later he entrusted the car to the highly regarded experts at Paul Russell and Company, a recognized authority in the care of vintage Mercedes-Benz sports cars. A number of minor measures were undertaken for optimal presentation, including the reinstallation of Europeanstyle headlamps, a correct repositioning of the side mirrors, and, as a result of minor damage, a high-quality exterior refinish in proper White (DB 50) paint. The owner also took considerable strides in bolstering the car’s history, including contacting original owner Mercedes Pollack and receiving from her a letter accompanied by several period photographs. She also sold the owner the original luggage rack, which was then reinstalled per the original delivery configuration. More recently, the Roadster has benefited from a 2015 rebuild of its original alloy engine, and the fitting for select events of the original Continental whitewall tires (one of two sets known to exist in the US). Chassis 3254 proceeded to amass a slew of concours awards when the consignor began to present the car in 2000. These included seven Best of Show awards at local events, as well as class awards at major concours like the 2002 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, the 2004 Meadowbrook Concours d’Elegance, the 2011 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance®, and the 2010 and 2012 Gull Wing Group Conventions. Documented with a virtual treasure trove of items including 3254’s purchase order, delivery note, period photographs, factory documents, and service records, this significant 300 SL Roadster is accompanied by a factory hardtop, three pieces of factory luggage, a second set of date-coded wheels, owner’s manuals, tool kit, and jack. It retains its factory-appointed interior, as well as exceptionally rare items such as Alfred Baisch seat belts, and Bullock-Rudge knock-off hubcaps, one of very few sets known to exist. This highly revered and impressively original Mercedes-Benz displayed just 57,424 km (35,681 miles) at the time of cataloguing and offers a unique opportunity to acquire the most developed expression of the celebrated 300 SL Roadster.Read more

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2003 Aston Martin DB AR1

Italian coachbuilder Zagato is responsible for styling some of the most iconic sports cars in history, and its 2003 collaboration between scion Andrea Zagato and Aston Martin’s chief designer Henrik Fisker produced a striking grand touring roadster with elegant refinements and a top speed in excess of 185 mph. Hand built in England, the DB AR1 – or American Roadster 1 – had a limitedproduction run of 99 cars that quickly pre-sold after a reveal at the Los Angeles Auto Show and a subsequent gallery showing in New York City. Featuring a stunning diamond-tucked leather interior and special Zagato-designed five-spoke alloy wheels, the AR1 looked every bit the part as a bespoke, coachbuilt Italian exotic. Mechanically, the DB AR1 used a tuned version of the six-liter V-12 engine producing 435 hp, an increase of 15 hp over the Vantage. Coupled with a revised final drive ratio, an active sport exhaust, and an AP twin-plate racing clutch, the AR1 enjoyed a noticeable jump in mid-range power and torque. Acceleration was impressive, with the roadster sprinting from 0–60 mph in 4.9 seconds. Braking was improved too, with the addition of multi-piston Brembo disc brakes using Pagid RS front pads to provide sustained performance and reduced shudder and fade at high speeds. An uprated Vanquish brake booster assured a firm and consistent pedal feel. The 18" special alloy wheels featured a new offset that widened the car’s track. Combined with low-profile tires, the car had an aggressive stance befitting its impressive performance. The DB AR1 offered here, numbered 37 of 99, is an extremely handsome example of the roadster. Finished in Tungsten Silver over Light Tan leather, the scheme is emblematic of the Saville Row sophistication unique to Aston Martin. None other than James Bond himself – actor Pierce Brosnan – has put his seal of approval upon this DB AR1, with a discreetly applied autograph inside the lid of the center console. Showing less than 1,000 miles from new, this DB AR1 is in outstanding condition and represents a rare opportunity to acquire an impeccable, limitededition coachbuilt car from the avant-garde Italian design house. Despite its extremely low original mileage, this car has received a complete factoryauthorized major service as recently as September 2017. The pairing of Zagato and Aston Martin – two of the most revered names in automotive history – has produced another stunning collaboration brimming with elegance and performance. This DB AR1’s distinguished charms should appeal equally to collectors of Aston Martin, admirers of Zagato, and driving enthusiasts who enjoy high-performance, open-air motoring.Read more

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1933 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Continental Three-Position Drophead Coupe

Interested in this vehicle? Call 310.899.1960 to speak with a Specialist today!   PROVENANCE Captain John Wanamaker Jr., New York, New York (acquired new in 1933) Sir Terence J. O’Connor, Oxfordshire, England (acquired from the estate of the above in 1936) Patrick D. de Laszlo, England (acquired circa 1940) A. Jones, England (acquired circa 1945) Captain Spencer Hart, London, England (acquired in 1950) Herman R. Zinn, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (acquired from the above in 1959) Dr. Gerard E. Schultz, Buffalo, New York (acquired from the above in 1961) Howard W. Kizler, Scottsdale, Arizona (acquired in 1965) Thomas W. Barrett III, Scottsdale, Arizona (acquired from the above in 1971) Craven Foundation Collection, Toronto, Canada (acquired in 1974) Richard B. Hooper, Seattle, Washington (acquired from the above in 1985) Harold Meden, Bellevue, Washington (acquired from the above in 1991) Ronald Benach, Chicago, Illinois (acquired from the above in 1999) Private Collection, London, England (acquired in 2006) Livio Cossutti, Bissone, Switzerland (acquired in 2009) Current Owner (acquired from the above) EXHIBITED Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club, 1959 (National Award) Western Inter-Regional, Vancouver, Canada, 1986 (Second in Class,Prewar Class) The Oregon National Vintage Tour, 1992 Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club, 1995 (National Award) Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club, Lake Forest, Illinois, 2006 Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club, Lake Forest, Illinois, 2007 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este, Cernobbio, Italy, 2011 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este, Cernobbio, Italy, 2015 LITERATURE Nick Whitaker and Steve Stuckey, The Rolls-Royce Phantom II & Phantom III, listed on pp. 190–191, photographed and discussed on pp. 112 and 425 Rolls-Royce Enthusiasts’ Club Newsletter, May/June 1989, pictured on p. 63 Bumper Guardian, April/May 1999, cover story The Flying Lady, November/December 1999, pictured and advertised on pp. 5, 903 The Flying Lady, September/October 2011, pictured on pp. 10, 175 THIS CAR The Rolls-Royce Phantom II made its debut in 1929 and comprised the final series of motorcars personally developed by Sir Henry Royce before his death in 1933. The Phantom II was designed to be a chauffeur-driven automobile and to compete head-to-head with the Bentley 8 Litre. In 1931, Sir Henry set about designing a new car based on the Phantom II with an eye toward longdistance, high-speed motoring throughout the Continent. Sir Henry envisioned a more compact, sporting chassis to be fitted primarily with owner/driver coachwork. With a 6" shorter wheelbase, shallower steering column angle, stiffer springs, additional shock absorbers, higher-ratio rear axle, and a lowered floor to allow for more rakish coachwork, the Phantom II Continental was born. It was a low, streamlined car, and with its chassis improvements and new fuel-delivery system, it was the fastest Rolls-Royce to date. Its long bonnet and light, sleek coachwork projected the image of speed. Countless Rolls-Royce aficionados consider the Phantom II Continental to be the finest of all prewar Rolls-Royce models. According to The Flying Lady of September/October 2011, the fascinating car offered here, a Rolls-Royce Phantom II Continental Three-Position Drophead Coupe, is one of just four built by the coachbuilder Barker. In Barker’s Coachbuilding – 1933–34, which illustrated this spectacular body style, it is described as “Barker Foursome Cabriolet DeVille.” In later depictions, the moniker changes to Three-Position Drophead. Continental chassis 186 MY was ordered as a Three-Position Drophead to the exacting specifications of Captain John Wanamaker Jr. in 1933. The grandson of John Wanamaker, the Philadelphia department store magnate, he served with the Army’s 78th Division during WWI and headed communications and transportation when President Woodrow Wilson was in France negotiating the Treaty of Versailles. Upon Capt. Wanamaker’s return to the States, the sporty new open-air Rolls-Royce was the perfect choice for him, as he was a fixture of high society, an avid sportsman, and a successful speedboat racer in the US and Europe. Regrettably, he didn’t own the car for long. Capt. Wanamaker died unexpectedly on November 30, 1934, at age 45. In 1936, this Rolls-Royce returned to England after being sold to Sir Terence J. O’Connor, a member of British Parliament. Around 1940, it was purchased by Patrick D. de Laszlo, who reportedly hid it and kept it safe throughout WWII. After the war, the car passed to two additional British owners before returning to the US in 1959 in the care of Herman R. Zinn of Rochelle Park, New Jersey. From 1959 until today, this Phantom II Continental has enjoyed loving care by Rolls-Royce enthusiasts in the US, Canada, England, and Switzerland, including a decade in the Craven Foundation Collection in Toronto. The Continental’s flowing coachwork is finished in a rich garnet tone over sleek black fenders. The interior is covered in buttery tan hides and Wilton wool carpet, and features beautifully restored woodwork. Opening the bonnet reveals the jewel-like Rolls-Royce inline six-cylinder engine – complete with a newly cast cylinder head – and a remarkable under-bonnet tool set. Receipts on file document the car’s history as well as attention given to its mechanical components. With a fascinating provenance rooted in notable American and British ownership and a period of hiding during WWII, this Phantom II Continental Drophead Coupe has a truly captivating past. Today, as a veteran of such high-level concours as Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este, and having completed such challenging multistate tours as the Classic Car Club of America CARavan and the Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club national vintage tour, this car stands as a rolling testament to Rolls-Royce’s enduring beauty and undeniable build quality. This intriguing motorcar represents an extraordinary opportunity to acquire an exceedingly rare, stunningly beautiful, prewar coachbuilt Rolls-Royce, considered by many to be the best Sir Henry Royce ever created. It offers the new owner an opportunity for concours competition, rallying, and long-distance touring.Read more

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1952 Bentley R-Type Continental Fastback

PROVENANCE André Simon, Paris, France (acquired new via Franco-Britannic Automobiles in 1952) M. Permanis, France (acquired via Franco-Britannic Automobiles in 1953) Father Joseph Reagen (acquired via Vintage Car Store in 1959) Mr. Theurer (acquired via Vintage Car Store in 1961) Phillip Lacios (acquired via Vintage Car Store in 1963) B. Eskow (acquired via Vintage Car Store in 1968) Eric Weissberg, Brooklyn, New York (acquired via Vintage Car Store in 1970) Current Owner (acquired from the above) LITERATURE Christian Hueber and David Sulzberger, The R-Type Continental Register, discussed on p. 12 Martin Bennett, Bentley Continental, chassis no. listed on p. 189 THIS CAR The Bentley R-Type Continental Fastback by H.J. Mulliner represents the very essence of 1950s grand touring. When it was unveiled in 1952, the Continental was both the world’s fastest genuine four-seater and the most expensive production car. Those fortunate enough to own one could reach 80 mph in second gear and continue on to a 120 mph top speed in the utmost comfort, luxury, and style. Of the 207 production R-Type Continentals built, 192 received fastback coachwork by H.J. Mulliner as developed on the prototype affectionately known as “Olga.” In every respect, the H.J. Mulliner Fastback is a stunning work of the coachbuilder’s art. From the gently curved front windscreen to the slightly raked grille and finned rear fenders, the design is breathtaking and evokes the graceful, effortless performance that Bentley provided with the specialized Continental chassis. To differentiate these high-performance chassis from the more pedestrian R-Type models, Bentley designated the Continentals with a special “BC” chassis number prefix. The exceptional design of the H.J. Mulliner Fastback was the result of extensive collaboration between the coachbuilder and Bentley engineering offices. Mulliner went so far as to consult with Pinin Farina in the early planning stages and conducted aerodynamic testing at Milford Read’s Hucknall Flight Test Establishment using a quarter-scale clay model. The result of this extensive development was a .388 coefficient of drag, a figure that bests the Malcolm Sayer-designed Jaguar E-Type of 1961. Weight savings was a critical factor, and it was achieved with Mulliner’s proprietary all-aluminum lightweight-construction method. The elegantly styled and aerodynamic coachwork utilized Reynolds alloy for the panels, inner structure, and window framing, while the carpets, leather, and glass were referred to as “aero-grade” and weighed less than standard materials. The Mulliner Fastback proved extremely popular and the body style was fitted to all A and B series Continentals. Only 15 cars from the C, D, and E series were fitted with alternative coachwork. Of all the R-Type Continentals built, the car presented here is surely among the most significant; BC1A is the first production car delivered to a customer. Just one car preceded BC1A in the development of the Continental, that being the aforementioned prototype, which was completed in August 1951 and retained by Bentley Motors until 1960. The fascinating history of this car can be traced to February 1952, when Bentley constructed the rolling chassis of BC1A. Like the vast majority of A-series Continentals, this car was specified in right-hand drive and had a 4.5-litre engine mated with a floor-mounted gear change. Upon completion, the Bentley chassis was transported to H.J. Mulliner, where it was fitted with the iconic fastback coachwork, designated by design number 7277. The body fitted to BC1A was numbered 5466 and finished in attractive Moss Green with tan Connolly leather upholstery. According to factory records, BC1A was originally outfitted with lightweight bucket seats and alloy bumpers – features that contributed to a relatively light curb weight of 3,765 pounds. A variety of custom features were specified, including twin fog lamps, door pockets in the seat backs, rear defroster, and radio. Furthermore, it was requested that the Bentley be delivered with a plain radiator shell, with no cap or mascot. Once returned to Bentley, BC1A was road-tested on May 14, 1952. As noted in Christian Hueber and David Sulzberger’s definitive Continental Register, this car was the subject of a special 393-mile test at the famed MIRA Proving Grounds, attended by Bentley’s chief engineer, Ivan Evernden, and H.J. Mulliner’s managing director, Arthur Talbot Johnstone. On June 4, after final preparations were made for delivery, this Fastback was shipped from Folkestone, England, to Boulogne, France, aboard the SS Maidstone. Two days later, the official French concessionaire Franco-Britannic Automobiles sold the Bentley to its first private owner, André Simon, who registered the car in Paris as “8 BH 75.” M. Simon retained BC1A for just one year; it was sold in 1953 to another Frenchman, M. Permanis. In 1959, the car was acquired by Ed Jurist of Nyack, New York, and imported to the US. Jurist was the proprietor of the Vintage Car Store, one of the preeminent dealers in fine classics and exotics. During his decades in business, some of the most important collectible cars passed through his hands, such as Alfa Romeo’s 8C 2900 and the 540 K from Mercedes-Benz. In June 1959, Jurist sold the R-Type Continental to its first private owner in the US, Father Joseph Reagen, but kept close track of the car, brokering its sale to subsequent owners throughout the 1960s. In January 1970, Jurist sold BC1A to musician Eric Weissberg of Brooklyn, New York, a multi-instrumentalist who performed with the folk group The Tarriers and later gained fame when his banjo recordings were featured in the film Deliverance. In 1974, Mr. Weissberg treated the Fastback to a cosmetic freshening, which included refinishing the coachwork in Antelope Brown and trimming the interior in matching brown leather. Remarkably, Mr. Weissberg retained the car for over 45 years, during which time it was driven sparingly and remained virtually unknown to the collector-car community. Offered for public sale for the first time in its history, BC1A presents today in fine, largely unrestored condition. Still wearing its 1970s-era paintwork and upholstery, this Continental Fastback has never required a complete, body-off restoration, a testament to the enduring quality of Bentley craftsmanship and the care it received in the hands of its long-term owner. Overall, the car possesses a consistent, inviting patina and performed well on a recent test drive with a Gooding & Company specialist. Significantly, this important Bentley still retains its original engine (numbered BCA1), H.J. Mulliner body tag, and French-language chassis plate. The R-Type Continental Fastback was the most sensational road-going car of its day – a grand touring machine of unmatched quality, style, and sophistication. Nearly 70 years after their introduction, these cars maintain a peerless reputation and an international following, with most examples residing in prestigious collections. Given its unique status as the first production Continental, BC1A must be considered among the most important R-Type Continentals, and thus one of the most desirable postwar Bentleys extant.Read more

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