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Bighorn Ram 302 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

A powerful image, mounted against a solid blue background, ‘Endangered Species: Bighorn Ram,’ shows off the namesake of the Bighorn Mountain Range in northern Wyoming. The Bighorn sheep originally crossed into North America over the Bering Land Bridge from Siberia, sparking the population in North America to peak in the millions, and thus the Bighorn sheep entered into the mythology of Native Americas. However, by 1900 the population had crashed to several thousand. Through an increased program of reintroductions, national parks, and reduced hunting, together with a decrease in domesticated sheep near the end of World War II, the Bighorn sheep was able to make a comeback. The animal continues to be an iconic image for many Native populations, and is know the official mascot for the Arizona Boy Scouts. In 1983 Warhol was commissioned by his friend and publisher Ron Feldman and his wife Freyda to create the series of 10 endangered species. Both Freyda and Ronald were celebrated political activists who were very active philanthropists. In 1983, they asked Warhol, who was a friend, to create a portfolio of ten endangered species to raise environmental consciousness. Warhol fondly referred to this series as his “animals in makeup,” given the bold pop colors he uses to portray the animals as larger than life, exemplified in the Bighorn Ram FS II302 printRead more

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Bald Eagle 296 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Warhol’s Bald Eagle 296 is thought to have captured the wild beauty of this rare bird. The bald eagle is also the national bird of the United States and is a symbol that was chosen by the Founding Fathers in 1782 as the Great Seal of the United States. The Great Seal depicts the bald eagle with 13 red and white stripes, on a blue field with the same number of stars. The eagle holds an olive branch in his right talon and in his beak is a scroll with the motto “e pluribus unum.” This specific print is considered to be one of the most desirable images in the portfolio. Bald Eagle 296, “e pluribus unum.”, In 1983, Warhol was commissioned by his friend and publisher Ron Feldman and his wife Freyda to create the series Endangered Species to raise environmental consciousness. Both Freyda and Ronald were celebrated political activists who were very active philanthropists. Warhol fondly referred to this series as his “Animals in Makeup” given the bold pop of colors he used to portray the animals as large than life. It was during the mid-1980s that Warhol was forming bonds with a number of younger artists in the New York art scene including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Julian Schnabel and David Salle. Warhol saw a re-emergence of critical and financial success during this period of his life. Other series produced during this period include the Shoes series, Myths series, and Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century. Endangered Species, “Animals in Makeup”, Shoes, Myths, Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth CenturyRead more

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Campbell’s Soup II: Old Fashioned Vegetable 54 as Part of Andy Warhol’s

Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup II: Old Fashioned Vegetable 54 is one of ten prints from his Campbell’s Soup II portfolio, which follows his first portfolio of Campbell’s Soup can imagery. In this collection, Warhol takes the ever-present American pantry staple and transforms it into high art simply by exactly mimicking the cans’ label. The second portfolio contains ten of the more unusual flavors from the original 32 that Warhol created in 1962, which were all real flavors of Campbell’s Soup cans. Campbell’s Soup II: Old Fashioned Vegetable 54, Campbell’s Soup II, These ten prints are slightly more unique than those in the first portfolio because of the more unusual flavors and added graphics on their labels, which make them visually stand out. Warhol’s collection of prints representing Campbell’s Soup cans is arguably his most iconic and widely recognized series of artwork. The Campbell’s Soup portfolios represent many themes that Warhol continues to work with throughout his career, including the powerful role that mass consumption plays on postwar society. The semi-mechanized process he used to create his works is something that is characterized with Warhol. His, Campbell’s Soup, series helped to usher in the Pop Art movement that endures today, renewed and rediscovered by artists such as Damien Hirst and Jeff KoonsRead more

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Ladies and Gentlemen 134 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Ladies and Gentlemen 134 by Andy Warhol is part of his Ladies and Gentlemen series that tackled the socio-political issues of cross-dressers. This print features a photo portrait and is transposed by blocks of color, emphasizing the glamorous and eccentric nature of crossdressing men and women. The Ladies and Gentlemen series is comprised of portraits of cross-dressers from a New York City night club called The Gilded Grape. Warhol took the cross-dressers’ portrait with a Polaroid Big Shot camera and then transferred the image onto silk screen. This was the same process he used on celebrities and other famous figures. Warhol told the cross-dressers to dress and pose however they wished. None of the subjects are famous but Warhol brings out the style and glamour in each portrait. The idea for the the Ladies and Gentlemen series (consisting of images of drag queens) came from a protegeé of art dealer Alexander Iolas named Anselmino, who had previously commissioned Warhol to do an edition of one hundred prints of Warhol’s Man Ray portrait. When Warhol went to Torino to sign the prints, Anselmino suggested he do a series of drag queens, suggesting portraits of Jackie Curtis, Holly Woodlawn and Candy Darling – not realizing that Candy Darling was dead. Instead, Warhol used models found at the The Gilded Grape on West 45th Street, frequented by black and Hispanic transvestitesRead more

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The Scream (After Munch) 1984 As A part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Warhol’s first immersive experience of the Norwegian master had came a decade earlier, on a 1971 visit to Oslo, when he spent time at the National Gallery and the Munch Museum. Surprised at how prolific Munch was as a printmaker, he professed at the time to being more impressed by his prints than his paintings. Warhol returned to the Bellman exhibit several times, eventually securing a commission to paint what became known as the After Munch series: The Scream, Eva Mudocci and Self Portrait juxtaposed with Madonna. In 1983 five canvases of each — a total of 15 works — were commissioned. ‘Warhol came to this imagery as a function of his respect for Munch, not only as an artist, but as a printmaker,’ says Richard Lloyd, International Head of Prints and Multiples at Christie’s. ‘There’s a long tradition of artists being very invested in Munch’s creative output in this medium. He was not only incredibly prolific, he was also very technologically innovative and experimental, which is something Warhol really responded to.’, After Munch, The Scream, Eva Mudocci, Self Portrait, Madonna, Prints and Multiples, technologically innovative and experimental, The following year, agreement was reached on a related project to create screenprinted versions of each of these motifs. The original idea was to issue 60 portfolios, each containing the three compositions. Warhol began work on the prints by ordering photographs and transparencies of the originals to be enlarged. These were then used as the basis of tracings, whereby he recreated the structure with bold graphite lines. The Pop artist worked with master printer Rupert Jasen Smith, who used stencils to add blocks of colour, producing a series of unique colour versions (Warhol was to select the most successful colour combinations for the edition). The combinations were extremely varied, ranging from two colours to half a dozen or more, from sombre browns and blacks to neon pinks and lime greens. In some the figure is in sharp relief against a muted background; in others the figure is almost invisible, completely subsumed by the landscape. Unfortunately, disagreements between the directors of Galleri Bellman meant the project was cancelled. The total number of unique Munch screenprints Andy Warhol produced is unknown, Lloyd says, but it is thought to be small. Intriguingly, Warhol’s development of the image was the reverse of Munch’s. The painted version of The Scream, with its swirling lines of colour, first appeared in 1893, while the lithographic version — which reduced this to a series of stark black lines — was published in 1895. What they have in common is the way in which colour was incorporated: Jasen Smith’s use of stencils closely mirrors Munch’s technique of cutting his woodblocks into sections and inking each in a different colour. The, Scream, lithographic version, By the early 1980s, when the Munch prints were made, Warhol was widely recognised as a master of the medium. He had famously executed his Soup Cans and Marilyns, and had begun to move on to more experimental things. Soup Cans, Marilyns, Marilyns, ‘What’s so interesting about these Munch prints,’ says Lloyd, and what links them to his earlier work, ‘is that it’s another image like the Soup Can; one that everybody knows. The Scream is one of the most well-known works in 20th-century art, if not the art historical canon, period. For that reason it’s a perfect fit for Warhol, who was obsessed with questions of celebrity and image production. It’s only natural that he would want to take it and make it his own. I think that knits very closely together with his practice as a printmaker and as an artist.’, Soup Can, Lloyd stresses that Warhol’s desire to reproduce an image by Munch, in particular, is equally significant. ‘They’re two artists who are closely linked to the idea of experimenting. While that may not be something one initially thinks when you first come to know these artists, it is really their willingness to experiment that made them both so tremendously important in the history of printmaking.’, “Bound by the Desire to Experiment: Warhol after Munch | Christie’s.” Andy Warhol Prints Inspired by Edvard Munch​’s ‘The Scream’ | Christie’s, Christies, 16 Apr. 2018, www.christies.com/features/Bound-by-the-desire-to-experiment-Warhol-after-Munch-9140-1.aspx. Andy Warhol Prints Inspired by Edvard Munch​’s ‘The Scream’ | Christie’sRead more

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Paolo Uccello St. George and the Dragon 324 as Part of Andy Warhol’s

Warhol’s larger portfolio entitled “Details in Renaissance Paintings” include several paintings in which Warhol transforms with his own signature style. One of them being Paolo Uccello’s St. George and the Dragon. Warhol recreated this painting into a screenprint of four, using different color combinations to add individuality to each print. Paolo Uccello St. George and the Dragon 324 showcases bold colors with a red-tone film that covers the whole print. This gives it a more Pop art and unique feel to the print. By focusing on the damsel’s upper body and one of the dragon’s wings, Warhol was able to extract this portion from the larger whole so as to emphasize the detailing in his print. Details in Renaissance Paintings, Warhol wanted to refurbish Italian Renaissance paintings into Pop art prints with bold colors. However, by producing many prints of different color combinations with the help of the screenprinting process, Warhol’s pieces became more commercialized. By focusing on specific parts of the original work, Warhol extracted his prints from the original context and meaning. This forced his audience to look at his prints separate from the original paintings, in a Pop art perspective. Despite Warhol’s intent to strip his works from the painting’s original context, he still honored and respected the works of the great artists of the Renaissance eraRead more

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