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Mick Jagger 140 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Mick Jagger 140 was painted while Warhol was at the height of fame. Warhol spent a lot of time with Jagger and his wife Bianca. He was was closest to their Jagger’s daughter, Jade, whom Andy taught how to paint. He produced this screenprint of Mick Jagger as part of a portfolio of 10 in 1975. Mick Jagger 140 is one of several pieces that Andy Warhol did on Mick Jagger. This verison is signed by Mick Jagger himself. In 1969 the Rolling Stones worked on their ninth studio album Sticky Fingers. The band approached Andy Warhol and asked him to design its sleeve. Warhol agreed and received a letter from Mick Jagger that included a polite warning not to make the cover too complex to avoid problems during production. Warhol ignored Jagger’s warning and went on to produce an unforgettable cover that featured a close-up shot of actor and “Warhol superstar” Joe Dallesandros. Warhol also expanded into the realm of performance art with a traveling multimedia show called The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, which featured The Velvet Underground, a rock band. Warhol also worked with his Superstar performers and various other people to create hundreds of films between 1963 and 1968. These films were scripted and improvised, ranging from conceptual experiments and simple narratives to short portraits and sexploitation features. His works include Empire (1964), The Chelsea Girls (1966), and the Screen Tests (1964-66). The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, Empire, The Chelsea Girls, Screen TestsRead more

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Flash 42 AS PART OF ANDY WARHOL’S LARGER BODY OF WORK:

Warhol’s Flash 42 is part of a portfolio of eleven different screenprints based on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963. The piece was named for all the “news flash” texts that were being broadcast at the time. All of the prints were based on campaign posters, mass-media photographs, and advertisements. The prints were presented next to Teletype text taken straight from news sources. The title Flash – November 22, 1963 represents the date of the assassination and the constant news attention about the event. Flash 42 features an inverted image of President Kennedy’s campaign posters in red and blue. There are two images of John F. Kennedy’s portrait layered in this print, with the smiling face that is easily recognizable. Flash 42, Flash – November 22, 1963, Flash 42, Warhol continued to use images from the media in his work while using the layering technique more and more to add depth to his images. Flash 42 demonstrates a clear statement about his feelings towards the media and how the American people react. Warhol is beginning to observe American society including its relationship with the media and its obsession with tragedy, which he continues to return to in later works. He continues to take on mass media in his work by challenging the norms and making people think differently about how they look at the information they are given. Warhol was quoted in saying that “what bothered me was the way television and radio were programming everybody to feel so sad. It seemed like no matter how hard you tried, you couldn’t get away from the thing.”, With this portfolio, Warhol revisits a subject he has already looked at with the Jacqueline Kennedy prints. However, this time Warhol is focusing on the man himselfRead more

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Mao 92 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Warhol presents Mao Zedong, the Former Chairman of the Communist Party of China, in a style reminiscent of his celebrity portraits. He fuses together the image of totalitarian propaganda and the colors found in his celebrity art to demonstrate the cult of personality surrounding the Chinese ruler. He uses bright colors and applies them in a makeup-like fashion as a form of personalization, a sharp contrast to Communist ideologies, which shunned individualism. This juxtaposition is taken further by the number of variations Warhol made of this image. After President Nixon’s 1972 visit to China, and the inevitable buzz it created in the press, Andy Warhol was inspired to create a series of prints that would immortalize the image of the Chinese leader, Mao Zedong. Warhol could see a blurry mirror image of United States media to Chinese propaganda.There were parallels between the cult like following in the West to movie stars and Mao Zedong in the East. Seeing these in a strange likeness, Warhol produced his Mao series in a fashion reminiscent of his portraits of American celebrities like Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley. These color charged screenprints of Mao were further set apart by the layers of graffiti-like scribbles that were screened on separately, transforming Mao into a worldwide pop icon. Mao, Andy Warhol created the Mao series during the early 1970s when he was taking many commissions for celebrities. Celebrity portraits developed into a significant aspect of his career and a main source of income. Other series produced during this time are the Mick Jagger series, Muhammad Ali series and unpublished works of various celebrities such as Truman Capote. Mick Jagger, Muhammad AliRead more

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Flowers 65 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Flowers 65 is a screenprint from one of Andy Warhol’s most popular series. It is well known and a favorite among Andy Warhol collectors. Many of Andy Warhol’s sources of content comes from appropriated material. Warhol would often find his imagery for his screen prints in advertisements and magazines. Based on a photograph by the nature photographer Patricia Caulfield, Warhol made prints of hibiscus flowers with petals in contrasting colors. The vibrant and bright color combinations in these works are characteristically Warhol. The artist’s choice in cropping the image into a square format gives a unique opportunity for the piece to be viewed in varying ways. Following Andy Warhol’s famously censored work The Thirteen Most Wanted Men, which featured the mug shots of criminals, Warhol created the Flowers portfolio in the 1970s. Flowers are often representative of fragility and purity, the paintings then were a drastic departure in content following the display of The Thirteen Most Wanted Men. At the time Warhol created these works, the Flower Power movement was well established and while the artist himself was not a part of the movement, it was perhaps an influence in the making of these works. Warhol continued with floral imagery in his portfolios Flowers (Black and White) and Flowers (Hand-Colored). The Thirteen Most Wanted Men, The Thirteen Most Wanted MenRead more

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Marilyn Invitation (Castelli Graphics) as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger

Marilyn Invitation (Castelli Graphics) is a miniature version of Andy Warhol’s Marilyn (FS II.30) and was created as an announcement for the exhibition Andy Warhol: A Print Retrospective 1963-1981 on display from November 21 to December 22, 1981 at Castelli Gallery in New York. Along with his pop art images of Brillo boxes and Campbell’s soup cans, Warhol created celebrity portraits of famous icons such as Marilyn Monroe and Jane Fonda. Originally printed in the early 1960s, Marilyn became the quintessential pop icon in the Pop Art Movement and for Andy Warhol. Andy Warhol: A Print Retrospective 1963-1981, After the success of the Campbell’s Soup Can series in the early 1960s, Andy Warhol began creating screenprints of celebrity portraits including Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley and Elizabeth Taylor. In addition, Warhol expanded into the realm of performance art with a traveling multimedia show between 1966 and 1967 called The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, which featured the rock band The Velvet Underground. Warhol also worked with his Superstar performers and various people to create hundreds of films between 1963 and 1968. These films were scripted and improvised ranging from conceptual experiments and simple narratives to short portraits and sexploitation features. His works include Empire (1964), The Chelsea Girls (1966), and The Screen Tests (1964-66). The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, Empire, The Chelsea Girls, The Screen TestsRead more

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Flowers 66 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Flowers 66 is a screenprint from one of Andy Warhol’s most popular series. It is well known and a favorite among Andy Warhol collectors. Many of Andy Warhol’s sources of content comes from appropriated material. Warhol would often find his imagery for his screen prints in advertisements and magazines. Based on a photograph by the nature photographer Patricia Caulfield, Warhol made prints of hibiscus flowers with petals in contrasting colors. The vibrant and bright color combinations in these works are characteristically Warhol. The artist’s choice in cropping the image into a square format gives a unique opportunity for the piece to be viewed in varying ways. Following Andy Warhol’s famously censored work The Thirteen Most Wanted Men, which featured the mug shots of criminals, Warhol created the Flowers portfolio in the 1970s. Flowers are often representative of fragility and purity, the paintings then were a drastic departure in content following the display of The Thirteen Most Wanted Men. At the time Warhol created these works, the Flower Power movement was well established and while the artist himself was not a part of the movement, it was perhaps an influence in the making of these works. Warhol continued with floral imagery in his portfolios Flowers (Black and White) and Flowers (Hand-Colored). The Thirteen Most Wanted Men, The Thirteen Most Wanted MenRead more

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Satyric Festival Song 387 By Andy Warhol as Part of a Larger Body of Work

Known as the mother of the modern movement, Graham’s influence is immensely profound on performing arts culture. Ahead of her contemporaries, she was the first dancer to perform at the White House and founded the renowned Martha Graham Dance Company in New York. She once said, “I have spent all my life with dance and being a dancer. It’s permitting life to use you in a very intense way. Sometimes it is not pleasant. Sometimes it is fearful. But nevertheless it is inevitable. (New York Times, 1985)” Since 1929, Graham danced professionally until her retirement in 1958; however, she continued to teach at her dance company until her death in 1991 at the age of 96. I have spent all my life with dance and being a dancer. It’s permitting life to use you in a very intense way. Sometimes it is not pleasant. Sometimes it is fearful. But nevertheless it is inevitable, Satyric Festival Song 387 is one of three screenprints produced in the Martha Graham series of 1986. The source image for the series is by American photographer Barbara Morgan, best known for her depictions of modern dancers. To commemorate the 16th anniversary of the Martha Graham Dance Center of Contemporary Dance in New York, Andy Warhol created the portfolio in appreciation of her contribution to the performing arts discipline. Warhol’s portfolio compliments Graham by showing a variation of her abilities not just as a dancer, but as someone who communicates profound emotion through movement and physical expression. Andy WarholRead more

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Campbell’s Soup Can 4 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Can (Tomato) 4 and his portfolios depicting Campbell’s Soup cans is arguably his most iconic and widely recognized series of artwork. In this collection, Warhol takes the ever-present American pantry staple and transforms it into high art. Warhol, originally a commercial graphic artist, found the imagery of the Campbell’s Soup label a powerful visual tool, since the design had remained successfully unchanged for decades. This bag was created in 1964 for the American Supermarket Exhibition at the Bianchini Gallery. Campbell’s Soup Can (Tomato) 4, American Supermarket, American Supermarket, Campbell’s Soup Can (Tomato) 4 and the rest of the series were a legitimate subject as a modern still life during the postwar American economy. First shown at the Ferus Gallery (Los Angeles) in 1962, the exhibit started as a series of paintings that eventually led to his success in the future. Furthermore, Warhol had just started to experiment with screenprinting a few years prior, which was a medium that would change the art world forever. Some of the most famous and recognizable images in art history come from Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup series because of his screenprinting process and decision to depict banal subject matter, which helped redefine and complicate the concept of high art. This series helped to usher in the Pop Art movement that endures today, renewed and rediscovered by artists such as Damien Hirst and Jeff Koons. Campbell’s Soup, series helped to usher in the Pop Art movement that endures today, renewed and rediscovered by artists such as Damien Hirst and Jeff KoonsRead more

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Andy Warhol Reframed
A New York gallery is hosting a retrospective on the iconic artist with over 350 works on display.

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