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Bighorn Ram 302 (Trial Proof) as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

A powerful image, mounted against a solid blue background, ‘Endangered Species: Bighorn Ram,’ shows off the namesake of the Bighorn Mountain Range in northern Wyoming. The Bighorn sheep originally crossed into North America over the Bering Land Bridge from Siberia. The population of Bighorns in North America to peaked into the millions, and thus the Bighorn sheep entered into the mythology of Native Americas. However, by 1900 the population had crashed to several thousand. Through a reintroduction program into national parks, reduced hunting, and a decrease in domesticated sheep near the end of World War II, the Bighorn sheep was able to make a comeback. The animal continues to be an iconic image for many Native populations. The Bighorn is now the official mascot for the Arizona Boy Scouts. In 1983 Andy Warhol was commissioned by his friend and publisher Ron Feldman and his wife Freyda to create the series of 10 endangered species. Both Freyda and Ronald were celebrated political activists who were very active philanthropists. In 1983, they asked Warhol to create a portfolio of ten endangered species to raise environmental consciousness. Warhol fondly referred to this series as his “animals in makeup,” given the bold pop colors he uses to portray the animals as larger than life, exemplified in the Bighorn Ram FS II302 print. Andy WarholRead more

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Flowers 71 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Flowers 71 is a screenprint from one of Andy Warhol’s most popular series. It is well known and a favorite among Andy Warhol collectors. Many of Andy Warhol’s sources of content comes from appropriated material. Warhol would often find his imagery for his screen prints in advertisements and magazines. Based on a photograph by the nature photographer Patricia Caulfield, Warhol made prints of hibiscus flowers with petals in contrasting colors. The vibrant and bright color combinations in these works are characteristically Warhol. The artist’s choice in cropping the image into a square format gives a unique opportunity for the piece to be viewed in varying ways. Following Andy Warhol’s famously censored work The Thirteen Most Wanted Men, which featured the mug shots of criminals, Warhol created the Flowers portfolio in the 1970s. Flowers are often representative of fragility and purity, the paintings then were a drastic departure in content following the display of The Thirteen Most Wanted Men. At the time Warhol created these works, the Flower Power movement was well established and while the artist himself was not a part of the movement, it was perhaps an influence in the making of these works. Warhol continued with floral imagery in his portfolios Flowers (Black and White) and Flowers (Hand-Colored). The Thirteen Most Wanted Men, The Thirteen Most Wanted MenRead more

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Cow 12A as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

It is hard to imagine that this simple screen print of a New Jersey cow played a big role in Andy Warhol’s career. Warhol did not have any real interest in cows, in fact Ivan Karp was the one to suggest the subject matter and Gerard Malanga, Warhol’s printer, chose the photograph. Ultimately, it was what Warhol did with this image that made the final product so interesting and inviting. He chose to use his bright and aggressive color scheme, which gave the humorous impression that Warhol was printing a cow on an acid trip, in order to create a kind of chaos within a mundane image. It was during this time that Warhol furthered his role as the “Prince of Pop” and decided to take a public stand against painting, a medium in which he had previously been utilizing. He wanted to create an educational experience for the viewers, showing them what you can do with the screen-printing process, as opposed to the conventional methods of painting used at the time. “Prince of Pop”, Cow 12A, Cow 12A is the last of the four-color schemes in Warhol’s Cow series. This particular color-schemed print was published for an exhibition at The Modern Art Pavilion in Seattle, Washington in November, 1976. The color schemes that Warhol published between 1966 and 1976 were Pink Cow on Yellow Background (1966), Brown Cow with Blue Background (1971), Yellow Cow on Blue Background (1971) and finally Pink Cow on Purple Background (1976). Although Purple Cow was created in 1976, it was an extension of his second show at the Leo Castelli Gallery in Los Angeles in 1966. Warhol’s Cow wallpaper was his formal effort to introduce the production of wallpaper into his creative repertoire. The wallpaper was first printed in 1966 to paper the gallery walls for Warhol’s exhibition at the Leo Castelli Gallery. The opening showed walls covered in wallpaper consisting of repeated large fluorescent pink cow heads on a bright yellow background. Every inch of wall space from floor to ceiling on each wall was covered in these cow portraits. Cow, Pink Cow on Yellow Background, Brown Cow with Blue Background, Yellow Cow on Blue Background, Pink Cow on Purple Background, Purple CowRead more

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Andy Warhol’s

Andy Warhol’s, Andy Warhol’s Camouflage Series was printed in 1987 by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York. The Camouflage Complete Portfolio of eight screenprints are printed on Lenox Museum Board, they are signed and numbered in pencil on verso by the executor of The Estate of Andy Warhol on a stamped certificate of authenticity. The colors are not accurately reproduced since they are fluorescent. The screenprints included in Warhol’s Camouflage series are FS II.406 through FS II.413. Warhol’s Camouflage screenprints were the final works published before his death the same year. While still alive, Warhol had the opportunity to exhibit the Camouflage screenprints only once at a group show in New York, 1986. The pop artist was inspired to create the Camouflage series after his assistant, Jay Shriver, shared with Warhol that he was working on abstract paintings by pushing paint through the mesh of the military cloth. Warhol had Shriver go to the local New York army surplus store near Union Station to buy some camouflage fabric. Once Shriver had returned with the fabric, it was then photographed and the mesh was removed to only reveal the shapes and patterns of the fabric. Changing the originally muted militaristic color scheme to vivid pop colors, Warhol appropriated the composition of camouflage into striking abstract pieces of pop art. Warhol also collaborated with Stephen Sprouse, a notable fashion designer, to create a clothing line that used the camouflage print. Warhol also create a self-portrait with a camouflage print. When Warhol died, the Camouflage portfolio was printed, and he was not given the opportunity to sign them. Warhol’s Camouflage prints — an abstract yet iconic form — are an enduring testament to Warhol’s obsession with a shared, mass-produced visual language. CamouflageRead more

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Flowers 68 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Flowers 68, Flowers 68 is a screenprint from one of Andy Warhol’s most popular series. It is well known and a favorite among Andy Warhol collectors. Many of Andy Warhol’s sources of content comes from appropriated material. Warhol would often find his imagery for his screen prints in advertisements and magazines. Based on a photograph by the nature photographer Patricia Caulfield, Warhol made prints of the hibiscus flowers with petals in contrasting colors. The vibrant and bright color combinations in these works are characteristically Warhol. The artist’s choice in cropping the image into a square format gives a unique opportunity for the piece to be viewed in varying ways. Following Andy Warhol’s famously censored work The Thirteen Most Wanted Men, which featured the mug shots of criminals, Warhol created the Flowers portfolio in the 1970s. Flowers are often representative of fragility and purity, the paintings then were a drastic departure in content following the display of The Thirteen Most Wanted Men. At the time Warhol created these works, the Flower Power movement was well established and while the artist himself was not a part of the movement, it was perhaps an influence in the making of these works. Warhol continued with floral imagery in his portfolios Flowers (Black and White) and Flowers (Hand-Colored). The Thirteen Most Wanted Men, FlowersRead more

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The Scream (After Munch) 1984 As A part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Warhol’s first immersive experience of the Norwegian master had came a decade earlier, on a 1971 visit to Oslo, when he spent time at the National Gallery and the Munch Museum. Surprised at how prolific Munch was as a printmaker, he professed at the time to being more impressed by his prints than his paintings. Warhol returned to the Bellman exhibit several times, eventually securing a commission to paint what became known as the After Munch series: The Scream, Eva Mudocci and Self Portrait juxtaposed with Madonna. In 1983 five canvases of each — a total of 15 works — were commissioned. ‘Warhol came to this imagery as a function of his respect for Munch, not only as an artist, but as a printmaker,’ says Richard Lloyd, International Head of Prints and Multiples at Christie’s. ‘There’s a long tradition of artists being very invested in Munch’s creative output in this medium. He was not only incredibly prolific, he was also very technologically innovative and experimental, which is something Warhol really responded to.’, After Munch, The Scream, Eva Mudocci, Self Portrait, Madonna, Prints and Multiples, technologically innovative and experimental, The following year, agreement was reached on a related project to create screenprinted versions of each of these motifs. The original idea was to issue 60 portfolios, each containing the three compositions. Warhol began work on the prints by ordering photographs and transparencies of the originals to be enlarged. These were then used as the basis of tracings, whereby he recreated the structure with bold graphite lines. The Pop artist worked with master printer Rupert Jasen Smith, who used stencils to add blocks of colour, producing a series of unique colour versions (Warhol was to select the most successful colour combinations for the edition). The combinations were extremely varied, ranging from two colours to half a dozen or more, from sombre browns and blacks to neon pinks and lime greens. In some the figure is in sharp relief against a muted background; in others the figure is almost invisible, completely subsumed by the landscape. Unfortunately, disagreements between the directors of Galleri Bellman meant the project was cancelled. The total number of unique Munch screenprints Andy Warhol produced is unknown, Lloyd says, but it is thought to be small. Intriguingly, Warhol’s development of the image was the reverse of Munch’s. The painted version of The Scream, with its swirling lines of colour, first appeared in 1893, while the lithographic version — which reduced this to a series of stark black lines — was published in 1895. What they have in common is the way in which colour was incorporated: Jasen Smith’s use of stencils closely mirrors Munch’s technique of cutting his woodblocks into sections and inking each in a different colour. The, Scream, lithographic version, By the early 1980s, when the Munch prints were made, Warhol was widely recognised as a master of the medium. He had famously executed his Soup Cans and Marilyns, and had begun to move on to more experimental things. Soup Cans, Marilyns, Marilyns, ‘What’s so interesting about these Munch prints,’ says Lloyd, and what links them to his earlier work, ‘is that it’s another image like the Soup Can; one that everybody knows. The Scream is one of the most well-known works in 20th-century art, if not the art historical canon, period. For that reason it’s a perfect fit for Warhol, who was obsessed with questions of celebrity and image production. It’s only natural that he would want to take it and make it his own. I think that knits very closely together with his practice as a printmaker and as an artist.’, Soup Can, Lloyd stresses that Warhol’s desire to reproduce an image by Munch, in particular, is equally significant. ‘They’re two artists who are closely linked to the idea of experimenting. While that may not be something one initially thinks when you first come to know these artists, it is really their willingness to experiment that made them both so tremendously important in the history of printmaking.’, “Bound by the Desire to Experiment: Warhol after Munch | Christie’s.” Andy Warhol Prints Inspired by Edvard Munch​’s ‘The Scream’ | Christie’s, Christies, 16 Apr. 2018, www.christies.com/features/Bound-by-the-desire-to-experiment-Warhol-after-Munch-9140-1.aspx. Andy Warhol Prints Inspired by Edvard Munch​’s ‘The Scream’ | Christie’sRead more

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2525 Michigan Ave., D4
Santa Monica, CA 90404
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