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Ladies and Gentlemen 134 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Ladies and Gentlemen 134 by Andy Warhol is part of his Ladies and Gentlemen series that tackled the socio-political issues of cross-dressers. This print features a photo portrait and is transposed by blocks of color, emphasizing the glamorous and eccentric nature of crossdressing men and women. The Ladies and Gentlemen series is comprised of portraits of cross-dressers from a New York City night club called The Gilded Grape. Warhol took the cross-dressers’ portrait with a Polaroid Big Shot camera and then transferred the image onto silk screen. This was the same process he used on celebrities and other famous figures. Warhol told the cross-dressers to dress and pose however they wished. None of the subjects are famous but Warhol brings out the style and glamour in each portrait. The idea for the the Ladies and Gentlemen series (consisting of images of drag queens) came from a protegeé of art dealer Alexander Iolas named Anselmino, who had previously commissioned Warhol to do an edition of one hundred prints of Warhol’s Man Ray portrait. When Warhol went to Torino to sign the prints, Anselmino suggested he do a series of drag queens, suggesting portraits of Jackie Curtis, Holly Woodlawn and Candy Darling – not realizing that Candy Darling was dead. Instead, Warhol used models found at the The Gilded Grape on West 45th Street, frequented by black and Hispanic transvestitesRead more

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Camouflage 406 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Camouflage 406, Camouflage 406, is the first screenprint in Andy Warhol’s eight print series. It is one of the most recognizable as the pattern is used for American military uniforms. While Warhol distinguishes his prints from the source with the imposition of his trademark bright colors, this print’s colors most closely adhere to the pattern’s source which is characterized by a variation of dark and light greens. He also adds stark white accents, making the print more abstract looking than a simple recreation of the militaristic pattern. The Camouflage portfolio was the last set of prints Andy Warhol published before his death the same year. His assistant, Jay Shriver, had shared with Andy that he was working on abstract paintings by pushing paint through the mesh of military cloth and immediately Andy became inspired. He had Shriver run down to the local New York army surplus store near Union Station to buy some camouflage fabric. As soon as Jay had returned with the fabric, the fabric was photographed and the mesh was removed to only reveal the shapes and patterns of the fabric. Changing the originally dreary military color scheme to vivid ‘60s psychedelic colors, Warhol appropriated the composition of camouflage into striking abstract pieces of pop art. Warhol died the same year the Camouflage portfolio were printed and was not given the opportunity to sign these. While still alive, Warhol had the opportunity to exhibit the Camouflage screenprints only once at a group show in New York, 1986. CamouflageRead more

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Cow 12A Signed by Andy Warhol (Signed) as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger

It is hard to imagine that this simple screen print of a New Jersey cow played a big role in Andy Warhol’s career. Warhol did not have any real interest in cows, in fact Ivan Karp was the one to suggest the subject matter and Gerard Malanga, Warhol’s printer chose the photograph. Ultimately, it was what Warhol did with this image that made the final product so interesting and inviting. He chose to use his bright and aggressive color scheme, which gave the humorous impression that Warhol was printing a cow on an acid trip, in order to create a kind of chaos within a mundane image. It was during this time that Warhol furthered his role as the “Prince of Pop” and decided to take a public stand against painting, a medium in which he had previously been utilizing. He wanted to create an educational experience for the viewers, showing them what you can do with the screen-printing process, as opposed to the conventional methods of painting used at the time. “Prince of Pop”, Cow 12A, Cow 12A is the last of the four-color schemes in Warhol’s Cow series. This particular color-schemed print was published for an exhibition at The Modern Art Pavilion in Seattle, Washington in November, 1976. The color schemes that Warhol published between 1966 and 1976 were Pink Cow on Yellow Background (1966), Brown Cow with Blue Background (1971), Yellow Cow on Blue Background (1971) and finally Pink Cow on Purple Background (1976). Although Purple Cow was created in 1976, it was an extension of his second show at the Leo Castelli Gallery in Los Angeles in 1966. Warhol’s Cow wallpaper was his formal effort to introduce the production of wallpaper into his creative repertoire. The wallpaper was first printed in 1966 to paper the gallery walls for Warhol’s exhibition at the Leo Castelli Gallery. The opening showed walls covered in wallpaper consisting of repeated large fluorescent pink cow heads on a bright yellow background. Every inch of wall space from floor to ceiling on each wall was covered in these cow portraits. Cow, Cow series, Pink Cow on Yellow Background, Brown Cow with Blue Background, Yellow Cow on Blue Background, Pink Cow on Purple Background, Purple CowRead more

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Mick Jagger 140 as Part of Andy Warhol’s Larger Body of Work

Mick Jagger 140 was painted while Warhol was at the height of fame. Warhol spent a lot of time with Jagger and his wife Bianca. He was was closest to their Jagger’s daughter, Jade, whom Andy taught how to paint. He produced this screenprint of Mick Jagger as part of a portfolio of 10 in 1975. Mick Jagger 140 is one of several pieces that Andy Warhol did on Mick Jagger. This verison is signed by Mick Jagger himself. In 1969 the Rolling Stones worked on their ninth studio album Sticky Fingers. The band approached Andy Warhol and asked him to design its sleeve. Warhol agreed and received a letter from Mick Jagger that included a polite warning not to make the cover too complex to avoid problems during production. Warhol ignored Jagger’s warning and went on to produce an unforgettable cover that featured a close-up shot of actor and “Warhol superstar” Joe Dallesandros. Warhol also expanded into the realm of performance art with a traveling multimedia show called The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, which featured The Velvet Underground, a rock band. Warhol also worked with his Superstar performers and various other people to create hundreds of films between 1963 and 1968. These films were scripted and improvised, ranging from conceptual experiments and simple narratives to short portraits and sexploitation features. His works include Empire (1964), The Chelsea Girls (1966), and the Screen Tests (1964-66). The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, Empire, The Chelsea Girls, Screen TestsRead more

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Andy Warhol’s

Andy Warhol’s, Andy Warhol’s Camouflage Series was printed in 1987 by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York. The Camouflage Complete Portfolio of eight screenprints are printed on Lenox Museum Board, they are signed and numbered in pencil on verso by the executor of The Estate of Andy Warhol on a stamped certificate of authenticity. The colors are not accurately reproduced since they are fluorescent. The screenprints included in Warhol’s Camouflage series are FS II.406 through FS II.413. Warhol’s Camouflage screenprints were the final works published before his death the same year. While still alive, Warhol had the opportunity to exhibit the Camouflage screenprints only once at a group show in New York, 1986. The pop artist was inspired to create the Camouflage series after his assistant, Jay Shriver, shared with Warhol that he was working on abstract paintings by pushing paint through the mesh of the military cloth. Warhol had Shriver go to the local New York army surplus store near Union Station to buy some camouflage fabric. Once Shriver had returned with the fabric, it was then photographed and the mesh was removed to only reveal the shapes and patterns of the fabric. Changing the originally muted militaristic color scheme to vivid pop colors, Warhol appropriated the composition of camouflage into striking abstract pieces of pop art. Warhol also collaborated with Stephen Sprouse, a notable fashion designer, to create a clothing line that used the camouflage print. Warhol also create a self-portrait with a camouflage print. When Warhol died, the Camouflage portfolio was printed, and he was not given the opportunity to sign them. Warhol’s Camouflage prints — an abstract yet iconic form — are an enduring testament to Warhol’s obsession with a shared, mass-produced visual language. CamouflageRead more

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Flowers 72 AS PART OF ANDY WARHOL’S LARGER BODY OF WORK:

Flowers 72, Flowers 72 print is one of ten screenprints in the Flowers portfolio published in 1970. The portfolio comes six years after the sold-out exhibition at the Leo Castelli Gallery where Warhol first exhibited his Flowers paintings. This print, from the photograph by Patricia Caulfield, has four yellow flowers on dark green and black grass. It is one of the simpler prints from this portfolio, based on the color selection. Warhol took the photograph from the June 1964 issue of Modern Photography and then cropped, abstracted and inverted the image. The vibrant and bright color combinations found in all ten of the prints are very familiar to Warhol’s work. Flower imagery was a drastic departure from his previous work, which had been his Death and Disaster series. The flowers, which were to represent fragility, purity and delicacy, were far from death. But some believed based on Warhol’s obsession with the subject, they had a more morbid undertone than met the eye. Flowers, Modern Photography, Throughout Warhol’s career, he has appropriated images from magazines, advertisements and newspapers. The difference with this series is he has stepped away from his usual mass media, commercial imagery. Warhol got the idea to paint flowers from his friend Henry Geldzahler who was the assistant curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art at the time. The flowers connected back to a sense of art history, as most famous artists have had some sort of floral series. The Flowers were the only subjects that Warhol continuously returned to throughout his entire career, and played with in a variety of mediums. When Caulfield saw Warhol’s work, she sued him for using her photograph, he offered her two portfolios, but a cash settlement was reached instead. Because Warhol was afraid of being sued again, he began to use his own photographs more and more after this incidentRead more

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Andy Warhol Reframed
A New York gallery is hosting a retrospective on the iconic artist with over 350 works on display.

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Revolver Gallery
2525 Michigan Ave., D4
Santa Monica, CA 90404
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