Countries
  • USA
Objects "Albersheim's"

Bones McKinney Signed 1948 Bowman Reprint Basketball Card

Bones played for both North Carolina State University (2 years) and the University of North Carolina (1 year after the war interrupted his playing career). He had a six-year playing career in the NBA, most of them with the now-defunct Washington Capitols. He also played for the Boston Celtics. His final year with the Capitols (in the 1950-1951 season), McKinney was a player-coach; the team folded midway through the season. McKinney, known for his sideline antics, would later coach the Wake Forest University Demon Deacons, leading them to two Atlantic Coast Conference titles and an appearance in the Final Four in 1962. McKinney also coached Carolina Cougars of the American Basketball Association from 1969 through 1971. He coached them to a 42-42 record during the 1969-1970 season, good for third place in the East Division. The Cougars then lost in the first round of the 1970 ABA playoffs to the Indiana Pacers, 4 games to 0. As the 1970-71 season got under way, McKinney was named a vice president of the team. After a 17-25 start, halfway through the season McKinney was replaced as head coach by his assistant coach Jerry Steele. Steele also went 17-25 for the remainder of the season for a 34-50 record that failed to get the Cougars into the 1971 ABA playoffs. During the 1970-71 season, McKinney provided color commentary for the television broadcast of the 1971 ABA All Star Game. were to be submitted for a numeric grade. Offered is a signed 1948 Bowman Reprint Issued in 1990. He passed away in 1997. Item: 4194, Offered is a signed 1948 Bowman Reprint Issued in 1990. He passed away in 1997. Item: 4194, Bones played for both North Carolina State University (2 years) and the University of North Carolina (1 year after the war interrupted his playing career). He had a six-year playing career in the NBA, most of them with the now-defunct Washington Capitols. He also played for the Boston Celtics. His final year with the Capitols (in the 1950-1951 season), McKinney was a player-coach; the team folded midway through the season. McKinney, known for his sideline antics, would later coach the Wake Forest University Demon Deacons, leading them to two Atlantic Coast Conference titles and an appearance in the Final Four in 1962. McKinney also coached Carolina Cougars of the American Basketball Association from 1969 through 1971. He coached them to a 42-42 record during the 1969-1970 season, good for third place in the East Division. The Cougars then lost in the first round of the 1970 ABA playoffs to the Indiana Pacers, 4 games to 0. As the 1970-71 season got under way, McKinney was named a vice president of the team. After a 17-25 start, halfway through the season McKinney was replaced as head coach by his assistant coach Jerry Steele. Steele also went 17-25 for the remainder of the season for a 34-50 record that failed to get the Cougars into the 1971 ABA playoffs. During the 1970-71 season, McKinney provided color commentary for the television broadcast of the 1971 ABA All Star Game. were to be submitted for a numeric grade. Offered is a signed 1948 Bowman Reprint Issued in 1990. He passed away in 1997. Item: 4194, Price:, $95.00, QtyRead more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer

Marty Max Friedman signed 3x5 card document D. 1986 Basketball HOF Jewish

Marty Friedman(D. 1986) was a pro basketball player and coach and HOF’er. He played almost 20 years of pro basketball (1908-1927), while being mostly known for playing with the New York Whirlwinds. He is considered to be one of the best defensive guards of his era. Friedman later became coach of the Troy Haymakers of the ABL (1938/39). In a seventeen-year career (1910-27), Friedman played in almost every league in the East, habitually leading his team to championships. In 1921, he hit the hardwood with the New York Whirlwinds, one of the greatest pro teams in history. In the World Championship series, 11,000 people watched Friedman hold Celtics' shooting star Johnny Beckman to one field goal as the Whirlwinds defeated the Original Celtics, 40-27. The Celtics won the second game, 26-24, but officials were afraid that the excitable and unruly crowds would lose control and the deciding third game was never played. When World War I began, Friedman promoted basketball internationally. He organized a 600-team tournament in France, which prompted the Inter-Allied Games, a forerunner to the World Championships and Olympic recognition. He and Barney Sedran were referred to as "The Heavenly Twins". We offer a signed 3x5 card that he filled out information on his basketball career. TOUGH autograph!!! Item: 1855, When World War I began, Friedman promoted basketball internationally. He organized a 600-team tournament in France, which prompted the Inter-Allied Games, a forerunner to the World Championships and Olympic recognition. He and Barney Sedran were referred to as "The Heavenly Twins". We offer a signed 3x5 card that he filled out information on his basketball career. TOUGH autograph!!! Item: 1855, Marty Friedman(D. 1986) was a pro basketball player and coach and HOF’er. He played almost 20 years of pro basketball (1908-1927), while being mostly known for playing with the New York Whirlwinds. He is considered to be one of the best defensive guards of his era. Friedman later became coach of the Troy Haymakers of the ABL (1938/39). In a seventeen-year career (1910-27), Friedman played in almost every league in the East, habitually leading his team to championships. In 1921, he hit the hardwood with the New York Whirlwinds, one of the greatest pro teams in history. In the World Championship series, 11,000 people watched Friedman hold Celtics' shooting star Johnny Beckman to one field goal as the Whirlwinds defeated the Original Celtics, 40-27. The Celtics won the second game, 26-24, but officials were afraid that the excitable and unruly crowds would lose control and the deciding third game was never played. When World War I began, Friedman promoted basketball internationally. He organized a 600-team tournament in France, which prompted the Inter-Allied Games, a forerunner to the World Championships and Olympic recognition. He and Barney Sedran were referred to as "The Heavenly Twins". We offer a signed 3x5 card that he filled out information on his basketball career. TOUGH autograph!!! Item: 1855, Retail Price: $225.00, $225.00, Special Offer, Sale Price: $175.00, You Save: $50.00 (22.22)%, QtyRead more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer

Dave Tobey signed handwritten letter Basketball HOF

Dave Tobey refereed every important pro game in New York City between 1918 and 1925. In 1926, Tobey officiated Syracuse University vs. West Point, a game that featured the great Vic Hanson opposing All-America John Roosma, two future Hall of Famers. Many coaches witnessed this important and well-publicized game and Tobey became much in demand. From 1926 to 1945, he officiated the first game to experiment with a three-man crew (Georgetown vs. Columbia), the initial East-West game, three Army-Navy tilts and countless Madison Square Garden events. In 1945, Tobey announced his retirement to devote all of his time to teaching and coaching. After leaving officiating, Tobey was selected as one of the top officials of all time by a nationally recognized panel of sportswriters. Tobey wrote articles for Scholastic Coach and authored Basketball Officiating one of the first books on his profession. He died in 1988. We offer this HOF signed handwritten letter regarding his greatest thrills Item: 1354, We offer this HOF signed handwritten letter regarding his greatest thrills Item: 1354, Dave Tobey refereed every important pro game in New York City between 1918 and 1925. In 1926, Tobey officiated Syracuse University vs. West Point, a game that featured the great Vic Hanson opposing All-America John Roosma, two future Hall of Famers. Many coaches witnessed this important and well-publicized game and Tobey became much in demand. From 1926 to 1945, he officiated the first game to experiment with a three-man crew (Georgetown vs. Columbia), the initial East-West game, three Army-Navy tilts and countless Madison Square Garden events. In 1945, Tobey announced his retirement to devote all of his time to teaching and coaching. After leaving officiating, Tobey was selected as one of the top officials of all time by a nationally recognized panel of sportswriters. Tobey wrote articles for Scholastic Coach and authored Basketball Officiating one of the first books on his profession. He died in 1988. We offer this HOF signed handwritten letter regarding his greatest thrills Item: 1354, Price:, $125.00, QtyRead more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer

Ray Scott Signed Handwritten Letter #3 – Voice of the Green Bay Packers

Ray Scott (D. 1998) first NFL broadcasts came in 1953 over the DuMont network; three years later he began doing play-by-play on Packers broadcasts for CBS-TV, and it was in Green Bay that his terse, minimalist style (e.g. : "Starr . . . Dowler . . . Touchdown, Green Bay.") developed its greatest following. Scott was also known for only occasionally using team names while broadcasting, more often identifying them by their city. Scott was paired primarily with Tony Canadeo on Packers telecasts. As the team's play-by-play announcer, Scott broadcast Super Bowl I and II for CBS, along with the brutally cold "Ice Bowl" NFL championship game of 1967. In 1968, CBS ended its practice of assigning dedicated announcing crews to particular teams, and Scott was appointed to the network's lead NFL crew, teaming with Paul Christman (1968–69) and Pat Summerall (1970–73). During his tenure with CBS he called four Super Bowls, seven NFL (later NFC) championship games, and the 1961 Orange Bowl; he also called major college bowl games for ABC and NBC during this period. Scott was the lead television and radio announcer for Major League Baseball's Minnesota Twins from 1961 to 1966, calling the 1965 World Series on NBC television alongside Vin Scully, the voice of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Scott's famous minimalist style was evident in his call of Lou Johnson's home run that broke a scoreless tie and proved to be the game winner ("Kaat's pitch, uh-oh, it's a long fly down the left field line. Home run"). After Sandy Koufax struck out his tenth hitter for the final out of the series, Scott stated "every pitcher likes to end a game with a strikeout. But this was not just any game. It was the 7th game of the World Series." After leaving Minnesota he called games for the Washington Senators in 1970–71 before returning to the Twins as a part-time announcer in 1973–75. Scott also called Milwaukee Brewers telecasts in 1976–77. CBS dismissed Scott in 1974,[1] replacing him with Summerall (who had been paired with Scott as a color commentator). He was subsequently employed as a local radio announcer by the Kansas City Chiefs (1974–75), Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1976), and Minnesota Vikings (1978–82). Scott also served as a narrator for the NFL Films Game of the Week in the 1970s and called play-by-play of Phoenix Suns basketball in 1974–75, syndicated broadcasts of Penn State football from 1975–81, the USFL's Arizona Wranglers in 1983 and 1984, and the Portland Breakers in the 1985 season. In 1988, Scott was one of several veteran announcers to call some September NFL telecasts for NBC, while many of the network's regular broadcasters were working at that year's Summer Olympics in Seoul. Scott also called UCLA, Arizona, Minnesota, and Nebraska football in the '80s, broadcast college basketball and golf at various points in his career, and teamed with Patrick Ryan while doing high school and college football in and around Billings, Montana. From 1986–88 he called the annual Peach Bowl game for the Mizlou Television Network. In the later years of his life he hosted a syndicated talk show on the short-lived SportsAmerica Radio Network. In addition to sportscasting, Ray Scott also read newscasts at WCCO-FM in Minneapolis in the late 1970s and early '80s. Offered is a handwritten letter on Ray’s personal letterhead to his friend John Derr, a noted golf sportswriter who reported from the Masters a record number, 62 times starting in 1935. Front and back Signed Ray with the original envelope dated from 1975. Ray thanks Derr for sending some books. He signed his name Ray, but wrote “Scott” at the top of the letter. RARE! Item: 9009, Ray Scott (D. 1998) first NFL broadcasts came in 1953 over the DuMont network; three years later he began doing play-by-play on Packers broadcasts for CBS-TV, and it was in Green Bay that his terse, minimalist style (e.g. : "Starr . . . Dowler . . . Touchdown, Green Bay.") developed its greatest following. Scott was also known for only occasionally using team names while broadcasting, more often identifying them by their city. Scott was paired primarily with Tony Canadeo on Packers telecasts. As the team's play-by-play announcer, Scott broadcast Super Bowl I and II for CBS, along with the brutally cold "Ice Bowl" NFL championship game of 1967. In 1968, CBS ended its practice of assigning dedicated announcing crews to particular teams, and Scott was appointed to the network's lead NFL crew, teaming with Paul Christman (1968–69) and Pat Summerall (1970–73). During his tenure with CBS he called four Super Bowls, seven NFL (later NFC) championship games, and the 1961 Orange Bowl; he also called major college bowl games for ABC and NBC during this period. 1953, DuMont, play-by-play, CBS-TV, Starr, Dowler, Tony Canadeo, Super Bowl I, II, Ice Bowl, 1967, 1968, announcing crews, Paul Christman, Pat Summerall, Super Bowls, NFL, NFC, 1961 Orange Bowl, ABC, NBC, Scott was the lead television and radio announcer for Major League Baseball's Minnesota Twins from 1961 to 1966, calling the 1965 World Series on NBC television alongside Vin Scully, the voice of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Scott's famous minimalist style was evident in his call of Lou Johnson's home run that broke a scoreless tie and proved to be the game winner ("Kaat's pitch, uh-oh, it's a long fly down the left field line. Home run"). After Sandy Koufax struck out his tenth hitter for the final out of the series, Scott stated "every pitcher likes to end a game with a strikeout. But this was not just any game. It was the 7th game of the World Series." After leaving Minnesota he called games for the Washington Senators in 1970–71 before returning to the Twins as a part-time announcer in 1973–75. Scott also called Milwaukee Brewers telecasts in 1976–77. Major League Baseball, Minnesota Twins, 1961, 1966, 1965 World Series, Vin Scully, Los Angeles Dodgers, Lou Johnson, Sandy Koufax, Washington Senators, Milwaukee Brewers, CBS dismissed Scott in 1974,[1] replacing him with Summerall (who had been paired with Scott as a color commentator). He was subsequently employed as a local radio announcer by the Kansas City Chiefs (1974–75), Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1976), and Minnesota Vikings (1978–82). Scott also served as a narrator for the NFL Films Game of the Week in the 1970s and called play-by-play of Phoenix Suns basketball in 1974–75, syndicated broadcasts of Penn State football from 1975–81, the USFL's Arizona Wranglers in 1983 and 1984, and the Portland Breakers in the 1985 season. In 1988, Scott was one of several veteran announcers to call some September NFL telecasts for NBC, while many of the network's regular broadcasters were working at that year's Summer Olympics in Seoul. 1974, [1], color commentator, Kansas City Chiefs, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Minnesota Vikings, NFL Films Game of the Week, Phoenix Suns, Penn State, USFL, Arizona Wranglers, Portland Breakers, 1988, Summer Olympics, Seoul, Scott also called UCLA, Arizona, Minnesota, and Nebraska football in the '80s, broadcast college basketball and golf at various points in his career, and teamed with Patrick Ryan while doing high school and college football in and around Billings, Montana. From 1986–88 he called the annual Peach Bowl game for the Mizlou Television Network. In the later years of his life he hosted a syndicated talk show on the short-lived SportsAmerica Radio Network. In addition to sportscasting, Ray Scott also read newscasts at WCCO-FM in Minneapolis in the late 1970s and early '80s. UCLA, Arizona, Minnesota, Nebraska, college basketball, golf, Patrick Ryan, Billings, Montana, Peach Bowl, Mizlou Television Network, WCCO-FM, Minneapolis, Offered is a handwritten letter on Ray’s personal letterhead to his friend John Derr, a noted golf sportswriter who reported from the Masters a record number, 62 times starting in 1935. Front and back Signed Ray with the original envelope dated from 1975. Ray thanks Derr for sending some books. He signed his name Ray, but wrote “Scott” at the top of the letter. RARE!, Ray Scott (D. 1998) first NFL broadcasts came in 1953 over the DuMont network; three years later he began doing play-by-play on Packers broadcasts for CBS-TV, and it was in Green Bay that his terse, minimalist style (e.g. : "Starr . . . Dowler . . . Touchdown, Green Bay.") developed its greatest following. Scott was also known for only occasionally using team names while broadcasting, more often identifying them by their city. Scott was paired primarily with Tony Canadeo on Packers telecasts. As the team's play-by-play announcer, Scott broadcast Super Bowl I and II for CBS, along with the brutally cold "Ice Bowl" NFL championship game of 1967. In 1968, CBS ended its practice of assigning dedicated announcing crews to particular teams, and Scott was appointed to the network's lead NFL crew, teaming with Paul Christman (1968–69) and Pat Summerall (1970–73). During his tenure with CBS he called four Super Bowls, seven NFL (later NFC) championship games, and the 1961 Orange Bowl; he also called major college bowl games for ABC and NBC during this period. Scott was the lead television and radio announcer for Major League Baseball's Minnesota Twins from 1961 to 1966, calling the 1965 World Series on NBC television alongside Vin Scully, the voice of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Scott's famous minimalist style was evident in his call of Lou Johnson's home run that broke a scoreless tie and proved to be the game winner ("Kaat's pitch, uh-oh, it's a long fly down the left field line. Home run"). After Sandy Koufax struck out his tenth hitter for the final out of the series, Scott stated "every pitcher likes to end a game with a strikeout. But this was not just any game. It was the 7th game of the World Series." After leaving Minnesota he called games for the Washington Senators in 1970–71 before returning to the Twins as a part-time announcer in 1973–75. Scott also called Milwaukee Brewers telecasts in 1976–77. CBS dismissed Scott in 1974,[1] replacing him with Summerall (who had been paired with Scott as a color commentator). He was subsequently employed as a local radio announcer by the Kansas City Chiefs (1974–75), Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1976), and Minnesota Vikings (1978–82). Scott also served as a narrator for the NFL Films Game of the Week in the 1970s and called play-by-play of Phoenix Suns basketball in 1974–75, syndicated broadcasts of Penn State football from 1975–81, the USFL's Arizona Wranglers in 1983 and 1984, and the Portland Breakers in the 1985 season. In 1988, Scott was one of several veteran announcers to call some September NFL telecasts for NBC, while many of the network's regular broadcasters were working at that year's Summer Olympics in Seoul. Scott also called UCLA, Arizona, Minnesota, and Nebraska football in the '80s, broadcast college basketball and golf at various points in his career, and teamed with Patrick Ryan while doing high school and college football in and around Billings, Montana. From 1986–88 he called the annual Peach Bowl game for the Mizlou Television Network. In the later years of his life he hosted a syndicated talk show on the short-lived SportsAmerica Radio Network. In addition to sportscasting, Ray Scott also read newscasts at WCCO-FM in Minneapolis in the late 1970s and early '80s. Offered is a handwritten letter on Ray’s personal letterhead to his friend John Derr, a noted golf sportswriter who reported from the Masters a record number, 62 times starting in 1935. Front and back Signed Ray with the original envelope dated from 1975. Ray thanks Derr for sending some books. He signed his name Ray, but wrote “Scott” at the top of the letter. RARE! Item: 9009, Price:, $95.00, QtyRead more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer

John McLendon signed Basketball HOF FDC D. 1999 1st black pro coach ABL

With an engaging personality and pleasant demeanor, an extraordinary knowledge of basketball history, and a coaching resume that made many in the profession envious, John McLendon (D. 1999) was one of the game's leading ambassadors for more than 60 years. McLendon, who learned basketball from James Naismith as an undergraduate at Kansas, is the first coach in history to win three consecutive national titles. McLendon's teams featured superior conditioning, a patented fast break offense, and an aggressive in-your-face defensive attitude. A spokesman for heightened awareness of basketball at all-black colleges, McLendon also helped initiate an era of integrated basketball. McLendon's well-rounded coaching background included positions at the collegiate, AAU, and professional level. He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1979. In 1961, McLendon became the first black coach of a professional basketball team in an integrated league, coaching the Cleveland Pipers for owner George Steinbrenner in the American Basketball League, a short-lived effort founded by Harlem Globetrotters owner Abe Saperstein in an attempt to compete with the NBA. We offer a basketball HOF signed 1961 FDC. Item: 4169, In 1961, McLendon became the first black coach of a professional basketball team in an integrated league, coaching the Cleveland Pipers for owner George Steinbrenner in the American Basketball League, a short-lived effort founded by Harlem Globetrotters owner Abe Saperstein in an attempt to compete with the NBA. We offer a basketball HOF signed 1961 FDC. Item: 4169, With an engaging personality and pleasant demeanor, an extraordinary knowledge of basketball history, and a coaching resume that made many in the profession envious, John McLendon (D. 1999) was one of the game's leading ambassadors for more than 60 years. McLendon, who learned basketball from James Naismith as an undergraduate at Kansas, is the first coach in history to win three consecutive national titles. McLendon's teams featured superior conditioning, a patented fast break offense, and an aggressive in-your-face defensive attitude. A spokesman for heightened awareness of basketball at all-black colleges, McLendon also helped initiate an era of integrated basketball. McLendon's well-rounded coaching background included positions at the collegiate, AAU, and professional level. He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1979. In 1961, McLendon became the first black coach of a professional basketball team in an integrated league, coaching the Cleveland Pipers for owner George Steinbrenner in the American Basketball League, a short-lived effort founded by Harlem Globetrotters owner Abe Saperstein in an attempt to compete with the NBA. We offer a basketball HOF signed 1961 FDC. Item: 4169, Price:, $49.00, QtyRead more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer

Gus Dorais & Joe Bach Notre Dame Football Legends 1944 Original Photo

Dorais, Dorais (d 1954) was a football player and coach at the collegiate level and a coach at the professional level. He developed into one of football's foremost students and tutors, a man possessed with untiring devotion to the sport. Although he and Knute Rockne would be recognized as one of the finest passing tandems of all time (during their time at Notre Dame), it would be as a coach, not as a player, that Dorais would gain election into the College Football Hall of Fame. Bach (d 1966) was one of Notre Dame's famed "seven mules" and later the head coach for the NFL's Pittsburgh Pirates (1935-36) and Pittsburgh Steelers (1952-53). At Notre Dame, he was a defensive lineman on the 1924 National Title team (the first Irish team to win a championship), and had a pivotal role in Notre Dame's first Rose Bowl trip. He became the Pirates coach in 1935 directing the young franchise to their best record yet at 4 wins and 8 losses followed by the 1936 campaign in which he coached the Pirates to their first ever non-losing season at 6 wins and 6 losses. He retired following 1936 to go back into college football. In 1952 he once again became the head coach for the Steelers and installed the T-formation for the team, which had been the last franchise to operate the single wing. He continued as head coach through the 1954 season. He produced a 5-7 result during his first and last season with the team but in 1953 posted a .500 record with a 6 win and 6 loss season. Offered is an original (10 x 8 inches) official US Navy photo dated Sept 10, 1944 with Bach and Dorais along with a group of Navy men. Excellent condition and superb clarity. Navy stamp on reverse. Item: 4086, Bach (d 1966) was one of Notre Dame's famed "seven mules" and later the head coach for the NFL's Pittsburgh Pirates (1935-36) and Pittsburgh Steelers (1952-53). At Notre Dame, he was a defensive lineman on the 1924 National Title team (the first Irish team to win a championship), and had a pivotal role in Notre Dame's first Rose Bowl trip. He became the Pirates coach in 1935 directing the young franchise to their best record yet at 4 wins and 8 losses followed by the 1936 campaign in which he coached the Pirates to their first ever non-losing season at 6 wins and 6 losses. He retired following 1936 to go back into college football. In 1952 he once again became the head coach for the Steelers and installed the T-formation for the team, which had been the last franchise to operate the single wing. He continued as head coach through the 1954 season. He produced a 5-7 result during his first and last season with the team but in 1953 posted a .500 record with a 6 win and 6 loss season. Bach, Offered is an original (10 x 8 inches) official US Navy photo dated Sept 10, 1944 with Bach and Dorais along with a group of Navy men. Excellent condition and superb clarity. Navy stamp on reverse. Item: 4086, Dorais (d 1954) was a football player and coach at the collegiate level and a coach at the professional level. He developed into one of football's foremost students and tutors, a man possessed with untiring devotion to the sport. Although he and Knute Rockne would be recognized as one of the finest passing tandems of all time (during their time at Notre Dame), it would be as a coach, not as a player, that Dorais would gain election into the College Football Hall of Fame. Bach (d 1966) was one of Notre Dame's famed "seven mules" and later the head coach for the NFL's Pittsburgh Pirates (1935-36) and Pittsburgh Steelers (1952-53). At Notre Dame, he was a defensive lineman on the 1924 National Title team (the first Irish team to win a championship), and had a pivotal role in Notre Dame's first Rose Bowl trip. He became the Pirates coach in 1935 directing the young franchise to their best record yet at 4 wins and 8 losses followed by the 1936 campaign in which he coached the Pirates to their first ever non-losing season at 6 wins and 6 losses. He retired following 1936 to go back into college football. In 1952 he once again became the head coach for the Steelers and installed the T-formation for the team, which had been the last franchise to operate the single wing. He continued as head coach through the 1954 season. He produced a 5-7 result during his first and last season with the team but in 1953 posted a .500 record with a 6 win and 6 loss season. Offered is an original (10 x 8 inches) official US Navy photo dated Sept 10, 1944 with Bach and Dorais along with a group of Navy men. Excellent condition and superb clarity. Navy stamp on reverse. Item: 4086, Price:, $50.00, QtyRead more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer

Rube Lautenschlager signed 3x5 card Deceased – NBL Sheboygan Red Skins

Rube Lautenschlager was a shooting star on the NBL Sheboygan Red Skins (from Wisconsin) from 1939 - 1947. Sheboygan won the title in 1943. On August 3, 1949, Sheboygan and six other NBL teams merged with the 10-team BAA to become the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Red Skins, who played in the NBA's all-time smallest arena and market, competed in the 1949–50 season under coach Suesens and finished with a 22–40 record, good for fourth place in the six-team Western Division. When Oshkosh folded soon after the merger, Sheboygan laid claim to being the oldest professional basketball franchise in the nation. The Red Skins marched to a 7–2 start on the strength of home wins over the Boston Celtics, New York Knicks, Rochester Royals, and Indianapolis Olympians. He passed away in 1992 and is a seldom seen autograph! This is a 3 x 5 card signed by Lautenschlager in blue ballpoint pen. Item: 3394, This is a 3 x 5 card signed by Lautenschlager in blue ballpoint pen. Item: 3394, Rube Lautenschlager was a shooting star on the NBL Sheboygan Red Skins (from Wisconsin) from 1939 - 1947. Sheboygan won the title in 1943. On August 3, 1949, Sheboygan and six other NBL teams merged with the 10-team BAA to become the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Red Skins, who played in the NBA's all-time smallest arena and market, competed in the 1949–50 season under coach Suesens and finished with a 22–40 record, good for fourth place in the six-team Western Division. When Oshkosh folded soon after the merger, Sheboygan laid claim to being the oldest professional basketball franchise in the nation. The Red Skins marched to a 7–2 start on the strength of home wins over the Boston Celtics, New York Knicks, Rochester Royals, and Indianapolis Olympians. He passed away in 1992 and is a seldom seen autograph! This is a 3 x 5 card signed by Lautenschlager in blue ballpoint pen. Item: 3394, Price:, $75.00, QtyRead more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer

Blog posts about "Albersheim's"

Realised prices "Albersheim's "

Find address and telephone number to Albersheim's

Advert