Countries
  • USA
Objects "Albersheim's"

JULIUS "DR. J" ERVING'S 1987 VICTOR AWARD

This 19-1/2"-tall (5-3/4"-diameter base) Victor Award was presented to basketball legend Julius Erving in 1987. The gleaming, gold plated statuette, which is widely regarded as the sporting equivalent of the Academy Awards, is annually bestowed in recognition of outstanding athletic achievements. A highly visual and aesthetically attractive presentation prevails as the carefully sculpted figurine extends his arm while holding a wreath in his hand. The 15-3/4"-tall icon stands atop a substantial marble base, and the plaque adorning the platform reads, "JULIUS ERVING 'DR. J' IN RECOGNITION OF YOUR EXTRAORDINARY ACHIEVEMENTS IN BASKETBALL AND OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTIONS TO HUMANITY VICTOR AWARDS XXI 1987 SPORTSMEN'S CLUB - CITY OF HOPE." With COA from Dr. J - NOT FOR SALE Item: 2395, This 19-1/2"-tall (5-3/4"-diameter base) Victor Award was presented to basketball legend Julius Erving in 1987. The gleaming, gold plated statuette, which is widely regarded as the sporting equivalent of the Academy Awards, is annually bestowed in recognition of outstanding athletic achievements. A highly visual and aesthetically attractive presentation prevails as the carefully sculpted figurine extends his arm while holding a wreath in his hand. The 15-3/4"-tall icon stands atop a substantial marble base, and the plaque adorning the platform reads, "JULIUS ERVING 'DR. J' IN RECOGNITION OF YOUR EXTRAORDINARY ACHIEVEMENTS IN BASKETBALL AND OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTIONS TO HUMANITY VICTOR AWARDS XXI 1987 SPORTSMEN'S CLUB - CITY OF HOPE." With COA from Dr. J - NOT FOR SALE Item: 2395, Price:, $0.00Read more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer
Fixed price

Deukoo Kim Signed Boxing Contract Boom Boom Mancini Fight – The Fight

One of professional boxing's great tragedies would happen on November 13, 1982, as Mancini recovered from an early onslaught from the Korean challenger to dominate the bout in the later rounds. During one exchange in the thirteenth round, Mancini connected thirty-nine times in a row, but the bout continued into the fourteenth, when Mancini struck with a hard right which sent Kim to the canvas, hitting his head hard. Kim rose to his feet, but the referee stopped the bout and awarded the TKO to Mancini, One of professional boxing's great tragedies would happen on November 13, 1982, as Mancini recovered from an early onslaught from the Korean challenger to dominate the bout in the later rounds. During one exchange in the thirteenth round, Mancini connected thirty-nine times in a row, but the bout continued into the fourteenth, when Mancini struck with a hard right which sent Kim to the canvas, hitting his head hard. Kim rose to his feet, but the referee stopped the bout and awarded the TKO to Mancini. Minutes later Kim collapsed and fell into a coma, passing away four days later. Both Kim's mother and the referee would die by their own hands within the year, compounding the guilt of Mancini, who was never the same fighter again. Offered here is a very rare promotional agreement for this fight between Kim and the promoter for the fight, Top Rank, Inc., which has been signed by Duk Koo Kim. This is a 2-page, typed Promotional Agreement. Boldly signed in ink on page 2 by Kim, his manager and the President of Top Rank, Michael Malitz. Stapled at top left corner. Clean. Crease in upper left corner and at center. Bold, clear type. 8.5x11." Extremely rare autograph of Duk Koo Kim on an equally rare agreement related to his ill-fated fight with Ray Mancini. Comes with a full LOA from PSA/DNARead more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer
Fixed price
2 000 GBP

Jack Lummus - Congressional Medal Of Honor - WW II Casualty - NY Giants

Jack Lummus (D. 1945 at age 29) was a two-sport athlete at Baylor University, a professional football player with the New York Giants, and an officer in the United States Marine Corps. He fought, and died, at the Battle of Iwo Jima during World War II and received the Medal of Honor for his service. He enrolled at Baylor on September 14, 1937 and was an All-Southwest Conference center fielder for three years and an outstanding end on the football team. Those three years, the Bears finished third in baseball, and Lummus was considered to be the best center fielder that had ever played for Baylor. Jack Lummus (D. 1945 at age 29) was a two-sport athlete at Baylor University, a professional football player with the New York Giants, and an officer in the United States Marine Corps. He fought, and died, at the Battle of Iwo Jima during World War II and received the Medal of Honor for his service. He enrolled at Baylor on September 14, 1937 and was an All-Southwest Conference center fielder for three years and an outstanding end on the football team. Those three years, the Bears finished third in baseball, and Lummus was considered to be the best center fielder that had ever played for Baylor. In football he played first-string end wearing No. 53. For two consecutive years, he was nominated by the Associated Press to the All-American team, and in 1938 he made honorable mention for the team. He was sometimes compared to Sam Boyd. Before he left Baylor, he signed a minor league baseball contract with the Wichita Falls Spudders and a uniform player's contract with the New York Giants. As one of the 30 players who made the Giants' roster, he wore No. 29. He had signed on as a free agent and received a $100 monthly salary. He made the team as a rookie end and played in nine games. On December 7, 1941, the Giants were playing their archrival the Brooklyn Dodgers. Around half-time, the Associated Press ticker in the press box gave out a message saying, "Airplanes identified as Japanese have attacked the American Naval Base at Pearl Harbor." The players continued the game, knowing nothing of the attack. The Giants lost but went on to play the Chicago Bears in the NFL championship game. After the championship game, Lummus enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserve on January 30, 1942. After finishing basic training at the Mainside recruit training center in San Diego, California, he was assigned to Camp Elliott, 10 miles north of San Diego. In January 1944, he was assigned as executive officer, Company F, Second Battalion. In August 1944, the division was transferred to Camp Tarawa outside of Waimea, Hawaii. Lummus boarded the USS Henry Clay for the trip. After four months of training, the Division was assigned to the V Amphibious Corps and would fight to take the island of Iwo Jima. Lummus was in the first wave of troops to land at Iwo Jima on D-Day, February 19, 1945. He landed at 9 a.m. on the beach known as Red One. He and his platoon spent the next two weeks incessantly fighting the dug-in Japanese. His initial duty was a liaison officer for the Second Battalion, spotting targets on the slopes of Mt. Suribachi for artillery and air strikes. On March 6, he was given command of Company E's third rifle platoon. On March 8, his platoon was spearheading a final assault on an objective east of Kitano Point, near the northern edge of the island. Despite minor wounds received from grenade shrapnel, Lummus knocked out three enemy strongholds, well-fortified positions arranged to defend each other, which were preventing his platoon from reaching its objective. Following this action, he stepped on a land mine and was mortally wounded, losing his legs. While lying on the ground, he urged his platoon on, until he was carried off to an aid station. At the aid station, he famously told the doctor, Thomas M. Brown, "Well, doc, the New York Giants lost a mighty good end today.". He was transferred to the field hospital, where he underwent surgery and a transfusion of 18 pints of blood, but died of internal wounds on the operating table. He was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. We offer a 1939 Baylor University yearbook signed by several students and athletes throughout the book including Lummus by his photo in the football section. This is an excruciatingly rare autograph. Wow!!! Item: 2455, In football he played first-string end wearing No. 53. For two consecutive years, he was nominated by the Associated Press to the All-American team, and in 1938 he made honorable mention for the team. He was sometimes compared to Sam Boyd. Before he left Baylor, he signed a minor league baseball contract with the Wichita Falls Spudders and a uniform player's contract with the New York Giants. As one of the 30 players who made the Giants' roster, he wore No. 29. He had signed on as a free agent and received a $100 monthly salary. He made the team as a rookie end and played in nine games. On December 7, 1941, the Giants were playing their archrival the Brooklyn Dodgers. Around half-time, the Associated Press ticker in the press box gave out a message saying, "Airplanes identified as Japanese have attacked the American Naval Base at Pearl Harbor." The players continued the game, knowing nothing of the attack. The Giants lost but went on to play the Chicago Bears in the NFL championship game. After the championship game, Lummus enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserve on January 30, 1942. After finishing basic training at the Mainside recruit training center in San Diego, California, he was assigned to Camp Elliott, 10 miles north of San Diego. In January 1944, he was assigned as executive officer, Company F, Second Battalion. In August 1944, the division was transferred to Camp Tarawa outside of Waimea, Hawaii. Lummus boarded the USS Henry Clay for the trip. After four months of training, the Division was assigned to the V Amphibious Corps and would fight to take the island of Iwo Jima. Lummus was in the first wave of troops to land at Iwo Jima on D-Day, February 19, 1945. He landed at 9 a.m. on the beach known as Red One. He and his platoon spent the next two weeks incessantly fighting the dug-in Japanese. His initial duty was a liaison officer for the Second Battalion, spotting targets on the slopes of Mt. Suribachi for artillery and air strikes. On March 6, he was given command of Company E's third rifle platoon. On March 8, his platoon was spearheading a final assault on an objective east of Kitano Point, near the northern edge of the island. Despite minor wounds received from grenade shrapnel, Lummus knocked out three enemy strongholds, well-fortified positions arranged to defend each other, which were preventing his platoon from reaching its objective. Following this action, he stepped on a land mine and was mortally wounded, losing his legs. While lying on the ground, he urged his platoon on, until he was carried off to an aid station. At the aid station, he famously told the doctor, Thomas M. Brown, "Well, doc, the New York Giants lost a mighty good end today.". He was transferred to the field hospital, where he underwent surgery and a transfusion of 18 pints of blood, but died of internal wounds on the operating table. He was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. We offer a 1939 Baylor University yearbook signed by several students and athletes throughout the book including Lummus by his photo in the football section. This is an excruciatingly rare autograph. Wow!!!, Jack Lummus (D. 1945 at age 29) was a two-sport athlete at Baylor University, a professional football player with the New York Giants, and an officer in the United States Marine Corps. He fought, and died, at the Battle of Iwo Jima during World War II and received the Medal of Honor for his service. He enrolled at Baylor on September 14, 1937 and was an All-Southwest Conference center fielder for three years and an outstanding end on the football team. Those three years, the Bears finished third in baseball, and Lummus was considered to be the best center fielder that had ever played for Baylor. In football he played first-string end wearing No. 53. For two consecutive years, he was nominated by the Associated Press to the All-American team, and in 1938 he made honorable mention for the team. He was sometimes compared to Sam Boyd. Before he left Baylor, he signed a minor league baseball contract with the Wichita Falls Spudders and a uniform player's contract with the New York Giants. As one of the 30 players who made the Giants' roster, he wore No. 29. He had signed on as a free agent and received a $100 monthly salary. He made the team as a rookie end and played in nine games. On December 7, 1941, the Giants were playing their archrival the Brooklyn Dodgers. Around half-time, the Associated Press ticker in the press box gave out a message saying, "Airplanes identified as Japanese have attacked the American Naval Base at Pearl Harbor." The players continued the game, knowing nothing of the attack. The Giants lost but went on to play the Chicago Bears in the NFL championship game. After the championship game, Lummus enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserve on January 30, 1942. After finishing basic training at the Mainside recruit training center in San Diego, California, he was assigned to Camp Elliott, 10 miles north of San Diego. In January 1944, he was assigned as executive officer, Company F, Second Battalion. In August 1944, the division was transferred to Camp Tarawa outside of Waimea, Hawaii. Lummus boarded the USS Henry Clay for the trip. After four months of training, the Division was assigned to the V Amphibious Corps and would fight to take the island of Iwo Jima. Lummus was in the first wave of troops to land at Iwo Jima on D-Day, February 19, 1945. He landed at 9 a.m. on the beach known as Red One. He and his platoon spent the next two weeks incessantly fighting the dug-in Japanese. His initial duty was a liaison officer for the Second Battalion, spotting targets on the slopes of Mt. Suribachi for artillery and air strikes. On March 6, he was given command of Company E's third rifle platoon. On March 8, his platoon was spearheading a final assault on an objective east of Kitano Point, near the northern edge of the island. Despite minor wounds received from grenade shrapnel, Lummus knocked out three enemy strongholds, well-fortified positions arranged to defend each other, which were preventing his platoon from reaching its objective. Following this action, he stepped on a land mine and was mortally wounded, losing his legs. While lying on the ground, he urged his platoon on, until he was carried off to an aid station. At the aid station, he famously told the doctor, Thomas M. Brown, "Well, doc, the New York Giants lost a mighty good end today.". He was transferred to the field hospital, where he underwent surgery and a transfusion of 18 pints of blood, but died of internal wounds on the operating table. He was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. We offer a 1939 Baylor University yearbook signed by several students and athletes throughout the book including Lummus by his photo in the football section. This is an excruciatingly rare autograph. Wow!!! Item: 2455, Price:, $695.00, QtyRead more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer
Fixed price
550 GBP

Cab Renick Signed Letter 1948 Olympic Basketball Team Native American

Jesse “Cab” Renick (D. 1999) was an American basketball player who competed in the 1948 Summer Olympics. Renick was A 6'2" Guard for Marietta High School in Marietta, Oklahoma. He went on to star at Oklahoma A&M University (now Oklahoma State). He was All-Missouri Valley Conference in 1939 and 1940 as well as an All-American in 1939 and 1940. OSU's first two-time All-American selection, he played on the United States Gold Metal Olympic Team alongside fellow Oklahoma A&M great Bob Kurland. He led the Cowboys to 45-11 record in his two seasons. Renick was also the second Native American, after Jim Thorpe, to win an Olympic Gold Medal. Offered is a typed letter signed dated 1949 to a sportswriter on Phillips Petroleum Company (He played for the Phillips 66ers, which was one of the best Industrial teams in the United States. Many of these players (although technically amateur) made more money “working” for Phillips than if they opted to play in the NBA. Nice content regarding the team’s international play and mentions the 1948 Olympics in London. Awesome Content! Item: 9112, Jesse “Cab” Renick (D. 1999) was an American basketball player who competed in the 1948 Summer Olympics. Renick was A 6'2" Guard for Marietta High School in Marietta, Oklahoma. He went on to star at Oklahoma A&M University (now Oklahoma State). He was All-Missouri Valley Conference in 1939 and 1940 as well as an All-American in 1939 and 1940. basketball, 1948 Summer Olympics, Guard, Marietta, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Missouri Valley Conference, All-American, OSU's first two-time All-American selection, he played on the United States Gold Metal Olympic Team alongside fellow Oklahoma A&M great Bob Kurland. He led the Cowboys to 45-11 record in his two seasons. Renick was also the second Native American, after Jim Thorpe, to win an Olympic Gold Medal. United States Gold Metal Olympic Team, Bob Kurland, Native American, Jim Thorpe, Offered is a typed letter signed dated 1949 to a sportswriter on Phillips Petroleum Company (He played for the Phillips 66ers, which was one of the best Industrial teams in the United States. Many of these players (although technically amateur) made more money “working” for Phillips than if they opted to play in the NBA. Nice content regarding the team’s international play and mentions the 1948 Olympics in London. Awesome Content!, Jesse “Cab” Renick (D. 1999) was an American basketball player who competed in the 1948 Summer Olympics. Renick was A 6'2" Guard for Marietta High School in Marietta, Oklahoma. He went on to star at Oklahoma A&M University (now Oklahoma State). He was All-Missouri Valley Conference in 1939 and 1940 as well as an All-American in 1939 and 1940. OSU's first two-time All-American selection, he played on the United States Gold Metal Olympic Team alongside fellow Oklahoma A&M great Bob Kurland. He led the Cowboys to 45-11 record in his two seasons. Renick was also the second Native American, after Jim Thorpe, to win an Olympic Gold Medal. Offered is a typed letter signed dated 1949 to a sportswriter on Phillips Petroleum Company (He played for the Phillips 66ers, which was one of the best Industrial teams in the United States. Many of these players (although technically amateur) made more money “working” for Phillips than if they opted to play in the NBA. Nice content regarding the team’s international play and mentions the 1948 Olympics in London. Awesome Content! Item: 9112, Price:, $149.00, QtyRead more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer
Fixed price
120 GBP

Dean Cromwell Signed Album Page USC & Olympic Track Coach D. 1962

Dean Cromwell(D. 1962), nicknamed "Maker of Champions", was an American athletic coach in multiple sports, principally at the University of Southern California. He was the head coach of the USC track team from 1909 to 1948, except 1914 and 1915, and guided the team to 12 NCAA team national championships (1926, 1930–31, 1935–43) and 34 individual NCAA titles. He was the head coach for the U.S. track team at the 1948 Olympic Games in London. He was the assistant head coach for the U.S. track team at the 1936 Berlin Olympics and in such role was responsible for removing Jewish athletes Marty Glickman and Sam Stoller from the US mens 4 x 100 meter relay team in order to mollify Adolph Hitler.Cromwell was also an opportunistic anti-semite who, in order to curry favor with Avery Brundage, U.S. Olympic Committee Chairman, joined the infamous isolationist, pro-Nazi organization, America First Committee, of which Brundage was a founding member and organizer. Cromwell also served as the head coach of the USC football program from 1909 to 1910, and from 1916 to 1918. His involvement with USC football goes back even farther; he is known to have officiated USC games as early as 1903, and he played (along with the coaches of both teams) for USC opponent Harvard in a 1905 game due to the weakness of the Harvard roster. In his first term as coach in 1909-10, he posted a record of 10-1-3; but this was exclusively against southern California competition, with no major colleges on the schedule. Like many schools, USC switched from football to rugby from 1911 to 1913. Cromwell returned as football coach in 1916, by which time USC's teams had begun to be known as the Trojans. But by this point, the university was facing competition which more regularly included major colleges such as California, Utah and Stanford, and his relative lack of expertise in the sport was more readily apparent; World War I also depleted the team's ranks in 1917-18. In his final three years his record was still respectable at 11-7-3, though only 4-4-1 against major colleges. In his final 1918 season, USC was 2-2-2 – not playing a home game in Los Angeles until December 14 due to a citywide ban on public gatherings during the Spanish flu epidemic – and he was replaced by Gus Henderson. During his tenure, Cromwell compiled a 21-8-6 record. Apart from Sam Barry, who took over the 1941 team in the wake of Howard Jones' death, Cromwell was the last USC football coach for whom it was not his primary sport. He also coached the USC basketball team in 1918, though they only played two games against the Los Angeles Athletic Club, losing both. He is a member of the National Track & Field HOF. We offer a vintage signed album page from 1931. Talk about rare!!! Item: 2387, Cromwell also served as the head coach of the USC football program from 1909 to 1910, and from 1916 to 1918. His involvement with USC football goes back even farther; he is known to have officiated USC games as early as 1903, and he played (along with the coaches of both teams) for USC opponent Harvard in a 1905 game due to the weakness of the Harvard roster. In his first term as coach in 1909-10, he posted a record of 10-1-3; but this was exclusively against southern California competition, with no major colleges on the schedule. Like many schools, USC switched from football to rugby from 1911 to 1913. Cromwell returned as football coach in 1916, by which time USC's teams had begun to be known as the Trojans. But by this point, the university was facing competition which more regularly included major colleges such as California, Utah and Stanford, and his relative lack of expertise in the sport was more readily apparent; World War I also depleted the team's ranks in 1917-18. In his final three years his record was still respectable at 11-7-3, though only 4-4-1 against major colleges. In his final 1918 season, USC was 2-2-2 – not playing a home game in Los Angeles until December 14 due to a citywide ban on public gatherings during the Spanish flu epidemic – and he was replaced by Gus Henderson. During his tenure, Cromwell compiled a 21-8-6 record. Apart from Sam Barry, who took over the 1941 team in the wake of Howard Jones' death, Cromwell was the last USC football coach for whom it was not his primary sport. He also coached the USC basketball team in 1918, though they only played two games against the Los Angeles Athletic Club, losing both. He is a member of the National Track & Field HOF. We offer a vintage signed album page from 1931. Talk about rare!!! Item: 2387, Dean Cromwell(D. 1962), nicknamed "Maker of Champions", was an American athletic coach in multiple sports, principally at the University of Southern California. He was the head coach of the USC track team from 1909 to 1948, except 1914 and 1915, and guided the team to 12 NCAA team national championships (1926, 1930–31, 1935–43) and 34 individual NCAA titles. He was the head coach for the U.S. track team at the 1948 Olympic Games in London. He was the assistant head coach for the U.S. track team at the 1936 Berlin Olympics and in such role was responsible for removing Jewish athletes Marty Glickman and Sam Stoller from the US mens 4 x 100 meter relay team in order to mollify Adolph Hitler.Cromwell was also an opportunistic anti-semite who, in order to curry favor with Avery Brundage, U.S. Olympic Committee Chairman, joined the infamous isolationist, pro-Nazi organization, America First Committee, of which Brundage was a founding member and organizer. Cromwell also served as the head coach of the USC football program from 1909 to 1910, and from 1916 to 1918. His involvement with USC football goes back even farther; he is known to have officiated USC games as early as 1903, and he played (along with the coaches of both teams) for USC opponent Harvard in a 1905 game due to the weakness of the Harvard roster. In his first term as coach in 1909-10, he posted a record of 10-1-3; but this was exclusively against southern California competition, with no major colleges on the schedule. Like many schools, USC switched from football to rugby from 1911 to 1913. Cromwell returned as football coach in 1916, by which time USC's teams had begun to be known as the Trojans. But by this point, the university was facing competition which more regularly included major colleges such as California, Utah and Stanford, and his relative lack of expertise in the sport was more readily apparent; World War I also depleted the team's ranks in 1917-18. In his final three years his record was still respectable at 11-7-3, though only 4-4-1 against major colleges. In his final 1918 season, USC was 2-2-2 – not playing a home game in Los Angeles until December 14 due to a citywide ban on public gatherings during the Spanish flu epidemic – and he was replaced by Gus Henderson. During his tenure, Cromwell compiled a 21-8-6 record. Apart from Sam Barry, who took over the 1941 team in the wake of Howard Jones' death, Cromwell was the last USC football coach for whom it was not his primary sport. He also coached the USC basketball team in 1918, though they only played two games against the Los Angeles Athletic Club, losing both. He is a member of the National Track & Field HOF. We offer a vintage signed album page from 1931. Talk about rare!!! Item: 2387, Retail Price: $450.00, $450.00, Special Offer, Sale Price: $150.00, You Save: $300.00 (66.67)%, QtyRead more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer
Fixed price

Carlos Teo Cruz Signed Photo Boxing Champ - D. 1970 at age 32

Carlos Teo Cruz(D. 1970 at the age of 32 in tragic plane crash) was a boxer from the Dominican Republic. Considered by many Dominican boxing fans to be one of the finest boxers ever born in that country, Cruz was world Lightweight champion from 1968 to 1970. He spent the first half of 1964 touring Australia, where he won 5 fights and lost one. Then, he returned to Latin America, his first fight after arriving in Australia being a major step up in quality of opposition for him: In Caracas, he met fellow world champion boxer Carlos Morocho Hernandez. He was knocked out in four rounds by Hernandez. On to Panama City, where he lost a ten round decision to Julio Ruiz. He finished his year by beating Marcos Morales in Santo Domingo. In 1965, he was undefeated. He fought in St. Croix, in Mayag?ez, in Caguas and in London among other places. He won all ten of his bouts that year. He won 8 bouts, lost 1 and drew 1 in 1966. He drew with Jaime Valladares in Quito, and lost to Frankie Narvaez in San Juan. But he also beat former world title challenger Bunny Grant. In 1967, he avenged his loss to Narvaez, and went undefeated the rest of the year, securing his position as the world's number one challenger among Lightweights. He won three more fights to begin 1968, and then, on June 29 in Santo Domingo, he was given his first chance to challenge for a world title. He became world Lightweight champion when he defeated Carlos Ortiz by a decision in fifteen rounds. He defended the world title with a fifteen round decision over Mando Ramos in Los Angeles, and then, he closed the year by winning a non-title bout in Tokyo, also by decision, in ten. There was a rematch between Cruz and Ramos, also held in Los Angeles. The second time around, Ramos became world Lightweight champion by beating Cruz with a nine round knockout. Cruz went on to win his next three bouts of 1969. Carlos Teo Cruz(D. 1970 at the age of 32 in tragic plane crash) was a boxer from the Dominican Republic. Considered by many Dominican boxing fans to be one of the finest boxers ever born in that country, Cruz was world Lightweight champion from 1968 to 1970. He spent the first half of 1964 touring Australia, where he won 5 fights and lost one. Then, he returned to Latin America, his first fight after arriving in Australia being a major step up in quality of opposition for him: In Caracas, he met fellow world champion boxer Carlos Morocho Hernandez. He was knocked out in four rounds by Hernandez. On to Panama City, where he lost a ten round decision to Julio Ruiz. He finished his year by beating Marcos Morales in Santo Domingo. In 1965, he was undefeated. He fought in St. Croix, in Mayag?ez, in Caguas and in London among other places. He won all ten of his bouts that year. He won 8 bouts, lost 1 and drew 1 in 1966. He drew with Jaime Valladares in Quito, and lost to Frankie Narvaez in San Juan. But he also beat former world title challenger Bunny Grant. In 1967, he avenged his loss to Narvaez, and went undefeated the rest of the year, securing his position as the world's number one challenger among Lightweights. He won three more fights to begin 1968, and then, on June 29 in Santo Domingo, he was given his first chance to challenge for a world title. He became world Lightweight champion when he defeated Carlos Ortiz by a decision in fifteen rounds. He defended the world title with a fifteen round decision over Mando Ramos in Los Angeles, and then, he closed the year by winning a non-title bout in Tokyo, also by decision, in ten. There was a rematch between Cruz and Ramos, also held in Los Angeles. The second time around, Ramos became world Lightweight champion by beating Cruz with a nine round knockout. Cruz went on to win his next three bouts of 1969. On January 17 of 1970, Cruz won what would turn out to be, tragically, his last fight. He beat Benito Juarez in San Juan by a decision in ten, and then returned to Santo Domingo. On February 15, he was flying back to San Juan alongside his family for a rematch with Ortiz, when their Dominicana de Aviacion DC-9 plane crashed into the waters of the Caribbean shortly after take-off, killing Cruz, his wife and 18-month child, and the rest of the passengers, among which also were a large part of Puerto Rico's national volleyball team (see: Dominicana DC-9 air disaster) Cruz had a record of 66 wins, 6 losses and 2 draws as a professional boxer, 34 wins coming by knockout. We offer a signed Boxing Illustrated Magazine cover. SUPER RARE. Item: 1836, On January 17 of 1970, Cruz won what would turn out to be, tragically, his last fight. He beat Benito Juarez in San Juan by a decision in ten, and then returned to Santo Domingo. On February 15, he was flying back to San Juan alongside his family for a rematch with Ortiz, when their Dominicana de Aviacion DC-9 plane crashed into the waters of the Caribbean shortly after take-off, killing Cruz, his wife and 18-month child, and the rest of the passengers, among which also were a large part of Puerto Rico's national volleyball team (see: Dominicana DC-9 air disaster) Cruz had a record of 66 wins, 6 losses and 2 draws as a professional boxer, 34 wins coming by knockout. We offer a signed Boxing Illustrated Magazine cover. SUPER RARE. Carlos Teo Cruz(D. 1970 at the age of 32 in tragic plane crash) was a boxer from the Dominican Republic. Considered by many Dominican boxing fans to be one of the finest boxers ever born in that country, Cruz was world Lightweight champion from 1968 to 1970. He spent the first half of 1964 touring Australia, where he won 5 fights and lost one. Then, he returned to Latin America, his first fight after arriving in Australia being a major step up in quality of opposition for him: In Caracas, he met fellow world champion boxer Carlos Morocho Hernandez. He was knocked out in four rounds by Hernandez. On to Panama City, where he lost a ten round decision to Julio Ruiz. He finished his year by beating Marcos Morales in Santo Domingo. In 1965, he was undefeated. He fought in St. Croix, in Mayag?ez, in Caguas and in London among other places. He won all ten of his bouts that year. He won 8 bouts, lost 1 and drew 1 in 1966. He drew with Jaime Valladares in Quito, and lost to Frankie Narvaez in San Juan. But he also beat former world title challenger Bunny Grant. In 1967, he avenged his loss to Narvaez, and went undefeated the rest of the year, securing his position as the world's number one challenger among Lightweights. He won three more fights to begin 1968, and then, on June 29 in Santo Domingo, he was given his first chance to challenge for a world title. He became world Lightweight champion when he defeated Carlos Ortiz by a decision in fifteen rounds. He defended the world title with a fifteen round decision over Mando Ramos in Los Angeles, and then, he closed the year by winning a non-title bout in Tokyo, also by decision, in ten. There was a rematch between Cruz and Ramos, also held in Los Angeles. The second time around, Ramos became world Lightweight champion by beating Cruz with a nine round knockout. Cruz went on to win his next three bouts of 1969. On January 17 of 1970, Cruz won what would turn out to be, tragically, his last fight. He beat Benito Juarez in San Juan by a decision in ten, and then returned to Santo Domingo. On February 15, he was flying back to San Juan alongside his family for a rematch with Ortiz, when their Dominicana de Aviacion DC-9 plane crashed into the waters of the Caribbean shortly after take-off, killing Cruz, his wife and 18-month child, and the rest of the passengers, among which also were a large part of Puerto Rico's national volleyball team (see: Dominicana DC-9 air disaster) Cruz had a record of 66 wins, 6 losses and 2 draws as a professional boxer, 34 wins coming by knockout. We offer a signed Boxing Illustrated Magazine cover. SUPER RARE. Item: 1836, Retail Price: $495.00, $495.00, Special Offer, Sale Price: $295.00, You Save: $200.00 (40.40)%, QtyRead more

  • USAUSA
  • Dealer
Fixed price

Blog posts about "Albersheim's"

Realised prices "Albersheim's "

Find address and telephone number to Albersheim's

Advert