Artemis Gallery LIVE

Artemis Gallery Live specialises in antiques, ancient and ethnographic art and they only sell authentic examples. All artefacts offered for sale are guaranteed ancient and authentic, and have been legally acquired and are legal to sell. The offer easy registration and accurate auction descriptions with professional photos for their online auctions.

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Objects "Artemis Gallery LIVE"

Important Veracruz Nopiloa Polychrome Female ex-Sotheby

Pre-Columbian, Mexico, Vera Cruz, Nopiloa, ca. 550 to 950 CE. A mold-made, painted terracotta sculpture depicting a priestess standing in a ceremonial pose with both arms bent upward, close to the body, presenting a tranquil countenance comprised of downcast eyes, a petite nose, and slightly parted lips revealing filed teeth. She wears an elaborate headdress, its layered turban form adorned with applied prominent floral rosettes with painted petals and long stamens emerging from their centers and flowing down to the arms; at the center is a flying bird with a trio of feathered plumes rising above. The priestess' garment, called a quechquemitl, is finely painted with a stepped motif. She also wears a necklace with a drop pendant and ear ornaments. The piece is painted white overall with bright sky blue details. Size: 11.5" W x 18" H (29.2 cm x 45.7 cm)This piece was featured at Sotheby's (see provenance below). According to the description in the catalogue, "Nopiloa ceramics are known for the fine mold-made figures related to the Mayan style of coastal Campeche. This figure relates to the goddess Xochiquetzal, "the flower of the rich plume", distinguished by her elaborate garments and headdress with flowers and birds." (Pre-Columbian Art, Sotheby's New York, Monday November 24, 1997, lot 135, p. 83) Provenance: ex private Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA collection, ex Sotheby's, Sale 7057, Pre-Columbian Art, Lot 135, November 24, 1997, with hammer/commission of $18,400 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #124791Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 17h
Low estimate
14 100 GBP

Pair of Inca Silver Arm Bands - Birds & Fish

Pre-Columbian, central Peru, Inca, ca. 13th to 16th century CE. A pair of elongated diamond-shaped armbands made from hammered silver, each one with intricately delineated designs, the upper example featuring two birds facing and perhaps flying towards one another, the lower one adorned with a pair of similarly symmetrically arranged fish. The surrounding fields present attractive stylized geometric motifs and dotted patterns. Together this pair represents the sky and the sea - symbolizing the celestial realm and the watery underworld of the Pre-Columbian era. Custom stand. Size: larger measures 6.5" W x 2.5" H (16.5 cm x 6.4 cm); 6.875" W x 6.875" H (17.5 cm x 17.5 cm) on standIn the Pre-Columbian world, birds were regarded as sky animals associated with the sun, moon, and Venus - where they served as messengers between humankind and the deities. Of particular importance were the eagle, parrot, and hummingbird. The beaks of the birds depicted on this example are closest to those of a parrot. Parrots were and continue to be revered by the ancients of South America. Their brilliant plumage and ability to fly high above the treeline made them ideal incarnations of the sky deities, thought to be endowed with supernatural powers of celestial origin. Marine life, including fish and shells, symbolized the subterranean watery sea environs of the underworld as well as the regenerative forces in this zone of death and rebirth. Provenance: private R.D. collection, Long Beach, California, USA collection, acquired over 25 years from various major galleries. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #124304Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 17h
Low estimate
1 200 GBP

20th C. Superb African Chokwe Wood Standing Male Figure

Africa, Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, ca. early 20th century CE. A tall wooden statue with a horizontally striped body and an expressive, dramatically carved face. The figure stands in a dynamic pose on a round, mound-like pedestal that is carved as one with the rest of the body. The body itself has nicely realistic details, including a slight paunch and bent knees, as well as a prominent phallus. The figure grasps two objects in his well-rendered fists: a rattle with fetish material rising from the top, and a staff capped by a rattle, also with fetish material rising from the top. Alternating bands of white and black paint and unpainted wood surface give the body, rattle, and staff the same color scheme, unifying them thematically below the face. Size: 6.85" L x 8" W x 26.2" H (17.4 cm x 20.3 cm x 66.5 cm)The face is largely black, with a long chin, a mouth with three teeth in it, and fetish material projecting from just outside either corner of the mouth, as if the figure portrayed has had their cheeks pierced. The figure has a prominent nose and deep-set eyes underneath a heavy brow. Scarification marks are on the chin, cheeks, and forehead, with the latter in the form of a stippled cross. Atop the head is a roughly conical helmet from which the face seems to project in an unnatural manner, like it is just a mask. The top of the head has been drilled through and it has woven and braided string tied through it. This figure may represent one of the Chokwe ancestors, who had to be honored by the living in order to secure peace and good health in the community. Provenance: ex collection of Alan Davis, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #124867Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 17h
Low estimate
1 600 GBP

Wonderful Aztec / Tula Pottery Openwork Censer

Pre-Columbian, Valley of Mexico, Aztec /surrounding states, end of Tollan phase, ca. 1200 CE. A pretty openwork censer with a long, looped handle. The body of the censer stands on two rounded legs, with a wide, flaring mouth and below that a register of glyph-like openwork patterns. The feet rattle. The body is painted red, with incised motifs, and the handle, feet, and underside are all painted pale brown. This style of censer is similar to the ladle censer, and is found in the Toluca Region and in the Basin of Mexico, one of the shared ceramic forms used by the Aztecs and their various client/tribute states. Size: 12" L x 5.3" W x 4" H (30.5 cm x 13.5 cm x 10.2 cm)Incense played a major role in religious practice in the Valley of Mexico. The chief priest would use a pouch of copal, tree resin from the torchwood tree, to create incense that would float outward through the openings on the bowl. By burning the copal, he made an offering to the gods - for example, during a ceremony for the god Huitzilopochtli, the hummingbird-formed god of war, priests hoped that their prayers would be carried upward along with the wafting smoke and scent. Provenance: private Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #124426Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 17h
Low estimate
1 600 GBP

Stunning Mayan Jade Death God Pendant

Pre-Columbian, Mexico and Guatemala, Mayan Territories, Late Classic, ca. 550 to 900 CE. Gorgeous apple green jade carved into a pendant in the form of a god's face - one of the Death Gods of the Mayan pantheon. The face is leering and skeletal, with huge empty eye sockets, a bone-like nose, and no mouth. Drill perforations pierce the sides diagonally and the area where the mouth would have been horizontally. The back of the pendant - where the jade fades to a creamy brown - is convex and largely uncarved, with two additional perforations drilled into it. Size: 0.9" W x 1.6" H (2.3 cm x 4.1 cm)The value of jade for people in ancient Central America lay in its symbolic power: perhaps its color was associated with water and vegetation, and it also seems to have related to beliefs about death and the afterlife. For example, the Maya placed jade beads in the mouths of the dead, and this pendant likely once adorned someone in the grave. This depiction of the Death God was probably location-specific, because many of the Mayan city-states had their own version, but adhered to general Mayan understandings about these ominous deities, who inhabit a dark underworld and often parade with a motley crew of spooks and were-beasts. Provenance: private R.D. collection, Long Beach, California, USA collection, acquired over 25 years from various major galleries. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #124354Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 17h
Low estimate
3 900 GBP

Quimbaya Tumbaga Seated Figural Poporo, XRF Tested

Pre-Columbian, Colombia, Quimbaya, ca. 1200 to 1400 CE. A remarkable cast tumbaga statuette depicting a seated lord or shaman sitting upon a four-legged stool. This piece is entirely in the round, and the treatment of gold or tumbaga in such completely three-dimensional terms is unusual in the ancient Americas. Though nude (with delineated genitalia), he is elaborately decorated with a grand crown adorned by four orb-shaped ornaments (possibly representing hallucinogenic mushrooms) atop a tiered, rounded pedestal with a base demarcated by a beaded square border upon his head, large coiled ear ornaments, a nose ring, a multi-stranded pectoral, beaded armlets and leg bands. His rather large head presents a focused or perhaps entranced visage with closed coffee bean shaped eyes, a naturalistic nose, and full pursed lips. He holds matching ritualistic staffs or implements, each with four spiraled finials in his hands. Note the sculptor's expert skill in delineating the seated form and capturing wonderful details such as those meticulously delineated fingers and toes and intricately described regalia. The gold ornaments of the Quimbaya - generally made through the lost-wax casting of tumbaga, utilizing beeswax - are incredible works of art, driving Spanish explorers to believe that El Dorado lived in the jungles of this area. Size: 2.125" W x 6.125" H (5.4 cm x 15.6 cm); Weight: 228.5 gramsFrom the earliest times, people in the Andes had a tradition of using coca leaves for ritual purposes. They were often ingested by placing some of the leaves in the mouth and adding a small quantity of powdered lime, ground from seashells. The poporo was a special vessel made to hold the lime. Gold decoration was associated with the highest ranked male members of Andean society, emphasizing this depiction as that of a lord. This poporo was made to be owned by someone powerful in the society and probably placed to provision an elite man's tomb.This item has been analyzed using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) by SGS Tecnos, Madrid, Spain. The lab conducted three tests, presumably of different areas of the piece. The tumbaga is composed of approximately: 75% Cu, 21.2% Au, 3.2% Ag, and .6% Fe. A copy of the results will accompany this piece. Provenance: private Spanish collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #122621Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 17h
Low estimate
11 800 GBP

19th C. Sicilian Painted Wood Processional Market Cart

Europe, Italy, Sicily (made in Palermo), ca. second half of the 19th century CE. An incredible piece of history, a wooden cart made in Palermo, Sicily, brightly painted on the interior and exterior. The exterior shows historical scenes from Christopher Columbus's journeys to the Americas on either side. This includes a scene of him speaking to a large group as he gestures to a globe, a scene of him presenting a cross and a flag before a crown of conquistadors and natives, a scene of him proposing his journey to a large group, and, finally, a scene of him presenting some indigenous Americans before King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella. Each scene is labeled in Italian on the bottom, although some of the letters have faded. There are two painted panels of standing medieval knights on the back (the tail board). Between those panels is what appears to be a crest with large words above and below it, but sadly the paint is too worn to discern what this once showed. Size: 72" L x 39" W x 41" H (182.9 cm x 99.1 cm x 104.1 cm)The interior has abstract sunburst designs on each side. Beneath the tail board are ornately carved, three-dimensional figures who form a decorative arch on the cart's struts. The struts themselves are also elaborately painted, with angelic carved faces forming the terminal for each strut. Delicate ironwork attaches the underside of the cart to the wheels, which are painted with bright floral patterns and whose spokes have childlike carved human figures on them. Eight wooden supporting columns - three on each side, two on the tail board - are capped by carved finials in the form of regal men and women, either saints or royalty. The long tongue ends in an iron fitting and it, too, is painted.Written in Italian across the top of each scene of Columbus is, "DANEU CORSO VITTORIO EMANUELE NO. 462 PALERMO". This tells us who made this cart and where it was made: the Daneu family, at the street address No. 462 Corso Vittorio Emanuele, Palermo, Sicily. The Daneu family were Slovenians from Trieste (then a part of Slovenia) who moved to Palermo and opened their antiques shop during the Belle Epoque, the period of western European prosperity from roughly 1871 to 1914. The Corso Vittorio Emanuele is also known as the Cassaro, the most ancient street in Palermo, and it was renamed to honor the king after the reunification of Italy. This street is the scene of a long procession during the Festino, on the night between July 14th and 15th each year, which is dedicated to Saint Rosalia, the patron saint of city. This beautiful cart was made to be a part of that procession. Provenance: private Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #124341Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 17h
Low estimate
9 400 GBP

Rare Olmecoid/ Chontal Stone Figure

Pre-Columbian, Mexico, Guerrero region, Chontal, ca. 800 to 300 BCE. A fine figure, skillfully carved from a smooth stone of sage green hues, showing very strong Olmec characteristics, but clearly Chontal from the Guerrero region. Depicted from the waist up with finely delineated arms presenting subtly drilled armpits, bent at the elbows with fingers (three on each hand) meeting across the abdominal area, rounded shoulders, and a visage with bold features - both incised and in relief - including coffee bean shaped eyes, a wide nose, ear phalanges, and a straight mouth with partially drilled dimples at the corners. Custom stand. Size: 1.875" W x 3.75" H (4.8 cm x 9.5 cm); 4.625" H (11.7 cm) on standThe Guerrero region of modern-day southwestern Mexico was the center of the Mezcala and Chontal stone carving traditions. While Mezcala artists are known for their abstract, geometric style, the Chontal sculptors imbued their artworks with more naturalism. Although their stonework stems from the Preclassic period, ca. 300 to 100 BCE, later Mesoamerican peoples clearly cherished Chontal portable sculptures as heirlooms. Chontal creations have been unearthed in ritual caches at Templo Mayor, the principle temple of the fifteenth-century Aztecs of Tenochititlan (Mexico City). What's more, legendary 20th century modernists such as Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, and Miguel Covarrubias appreciated the minimalist qualities of Chontal art. Covarrubias went so far as to compare it to the Cycladic style of ancient Greece. Provenance: Ex-Adeon Gallery, Chicago, Illinois USA, acquired prior to 1970. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #122159Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 17h
Low estimate
1 200 GBP

Large/Superb Colima Redware Dog Effigy

Pre-Columbian, West Mexico, Colima, ca. 300 BCE to 300 CE. An endearingly portly Colima ceramic puppy, one of the most famous types of West Mexican shaft tomb cultural artifacts. This little guy has a lively face with incised wide open eyes, a protruding snout with a pointy nose and pierced flaring nostrils, an open mouth revealing sharp teeth, perky ears and curly tail, and a huge belly - having been fattened up to be dinner perhaps! Size: 16.5" L x 8.5" W x 10" H (41.9 cm x 21.6 cm x 25.4 cm)Scholars know of at least two types of Colima dogs, one to be fattened up and ritually sacrificed or eaten and one to serve as a watchdog and healer of the ill. This plump hairless canine known as a Chichi or Escuintla is thought to be related to the Chihuahua or Mexican Hairless also known as the Xoloitzcuintle. The Xolo dog was named for the deity Xolotl, the God of the Underworld, and believed to guide the deceased as they journeyed to the afterlife. Colima vessels such as this one were buried in shaft tombs to protect the deceased and provide sustenance for eternity. Provenance: private Santa Fe, New Mexico USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #124428Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 17h
Low estimate
2 700 GBP

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Ancient Egyptian Wooden Boatman w/ Articulated Arms
Ancient Egypt, Middle Kingdom, ca. 2040 to 1802 BCE. A hand-carved, three-dimensional wooden boatman, with classic Egyptian face (large, dark-outlined eyes), a cropped haircut, and a white loincloth. He is in a seated position, with long, articulated arms, which probably would have been raised to hold oars in his original placement. During the Sixth Dynasty, it became common to place wooden models of lifelike scenes in Egyptian tombs; by the Middle Kingdom, they were placed in the tomb chamber, around the coffin, although some very rich tombs had a separate chamber just for wooden models. Two ships are found in almost all tombs that have models from this time period, and those ships are, during the Middle Kingdom, staffed by boatmen like this one. This boatman was made to be a servant in the afterlife, ready to row the deceased upon the eternal Nile, as real boatmen would have done in life. Size: 2.6" W x 6.6" H (6.6 cm x 16.8 cm) Provenance: Ex-Private Florida collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #116964 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Cute Nazca Polychrome Jar with Peppers
Pre-Columbian, southern Peru, Nazca culture, ca. 100 BCE to 800 CE. A jar with a flattened base and an apple-shaped body, with a conical spout and a flattened handle that rises from the broad shoulder to the middle of the spout. In classic Nazca style, it is decorated with broad bands of color and black outlined two-dimensional shapes. Around the shoulder, painted as if dangling from the white ring at the base of the spout, are several white and red alternating chili peppers. Nazca pottery, thin-walled and well-formed, with abstract designs in strong contrast to the realism of its contemporary to the north, the Moche, is known from underground burial chambers. This jar was made to be placed in a grave, perhaps full of offerings or symbolic libations like sand. Size: 5" W x 6.5" H (12.7 cm x 16.5 cm) Provenance: Ex-Private Joan Hersey Pavao Collection, acquired in the 1970's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118194 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Fabulous 11th C. Khmer Bronze & Iron Sword
ORIGINALLY OFFERED AT $500Southeast Asia, Cambodia, Khmer Empire, ca. 1100 CE. This is a short form of Khmer sword, known as a p'keak or phka’k, which is a curved handled weapon with an iron blade. They may have been used for clearing the dense forests of northern Cambodia as well as for fighting. This particular sword has a beautiful bronze handle with a simple two-dimensional cloud-shaped guard. This example particularly has a beautiful patina on the handle and the blade is in excellent condition for iron of its age and preservation. From the Angkor period onward (after 800 CE), it seems likely that southeast Asia underwent a great deal of conflict; inscriptions, reliefs, weapons deposited as grave goods, and, most recently, bioarchaeology all attest to a history of fighting and war. This sword is almost certainly related to that history. For example, excavations at the cemetery at Phum Snay have uncovered a wide range of weapons in many graves; while most were male, some belonged to females. Unfortunately, we currently have only fragmentary evidence for warfare and sword manufacture in the Khmer Empire because of the ravages of the Khmer Rouge on records of Cambodia’s history. Size: 22" L x 2" W (55.9 cm x 5.1 cm). Provenance: Ex- J. Piscopo collection, San Diego, CA All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #111118 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Huge Colombian Pottery Cylinder - Incised Geometrics
Pre-Columbian, Colombia, Middle Cauca, culture undetermined, ca. 1000 to 1500 CE. An enormous redware cylinder, its exterior walls incised with two registers of repeated nested rectangles, some with segmented central forms, one end with four pairs of double perforations and a flat rim. Although these carved squarish/rectangular geometric designs might lead one to identify the piece as Sinu, its slip is not characteristic of Sinu ceramics. According to a scholar who collaborated on Armand Labbe's "Colombia Before Columbus: The People, Culture, and Ceramic Art of Prehispanic Colombia" pieces like this have only been attributed to the Middle Cauca region, culture undetermined, and they are incredibly rare. Other than a few examples in private US collections, he knows of only one other similar example that is currently in the permanent collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. A mesmerizing vessel, intriguingly similar in form to a roller stamp, only of a much larger scale. Size: 10" in diameter x 26" H (25.4 cm x 66 cm) Provenance: Ex-Vaught Collection, Atlanta, GA All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #120741 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Chinese Jade / Aventurine Quartz Bead Necklace
China, ca. 20th century CE. Featuring a large carved jadeite center pendant / plaque incised with Chinese characters on both sides, suspended from a strand of eighteen aventurine quartz beads and completed by a macrame and loop closure. Center pendant measures approximately 74 x 96 mm (2.91" x 3.78"). Size: center pendant measures 2.91" L x 3.78" W (7.4 cm x 9.6 cm); each bead measures approximately .71" (1.8 cm); total length 20" L (50.8 cm). Provenance: ex-Lindstrom Collection, mostly acquired 1950 - 1970. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #115746 Artemis Gallery LIVE
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Artemis Gallery LIVE
PO Box 714, Erie, CO 80516
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