Artemis Gallery LIVE

Artemis Gallery Live specialises in antiques, ancient and ethnographic art and they only sell authentic examples. All artefacts offered for sale are guaranteed ancient and authentic, and have been legally acquired and are legal to sell. The offer easy registration and accurate auction descriptions with professional photos for their online auctions.

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  • USA
Objects "Artemis Gallery LIVE"

Touching 19th C. Mexican Tin Retablo - Mater Dolorosa

Latin America, Mexico, Spanish Colonial, ca. 1850 CE. An antique retablo skillfully painted in oil on tin depicting Mater Dolorosa or N. S. de los Dolores (Sorrowful Mother or Our Lady of Sorrows). This image is one of the most important compositions in which Mary is depicted without Christ. She is represented as the mourning mother projecting a grieving attitude, her head covered with a blue veil, her hands clasped together holding the Crown of Thorns, and a dagger pointed at her breast - the key, distinguishing attribute of Mater Dolorosa. The scene references Luke 2:35. In this passage, Mary is told that a sword will pierce her soul upon presenting Christ to the temple. It reads as follows, "And Simeon blessed them and said to Mary His mother, 'Behold, this Child is appointed for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and for a sign to be opposed--and a sword will pierce even your own soul-- to the end that thoughts from many hearts may be revealed.'" Size: 14" L x 10" W (35.6 cm x 25.4 cm) Provenance: private Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #124596Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 5d 2h
Low estimate
460 GBP

Huge Costa Rican Stone Metate

Pre-Columbian, Costa Rica, Atlantic Watershed region, ca. 1 to 800 CE. An exceedingly large ceremonial metate carved from volcanic stone, with a round-cornered, rectangular table/seat, numerous looped forms attached to the underside of the seat, supported upon three legs. This metate represents one of the most unusual traditions of the ancient Americas. Metates were initially created to grind foods such as corn, certainly a utilitarian purpose; however, they evolved into meaningful ritual objects, replete with strong iconography and intriguing sculptural forms which transformed these objects into much more than a tool. Given the enormous scale and intriguing embellishent of loop attachments to this piece, it was probably intended as a throne of sorts for an elite ruler(s) or to seat a departed lord on his journey to the afterlife. The size and work involved to create this metate suggests a ceremonial function. The looped ornaments may be related to the identity of the owner the piece or the ritual in which the metate was used. Size: 15" L x 37.125" W x 7.5" H (38.1 cm x 94.3 cm x 19 cm) Provenance: collection of the late Alfred E. Stendahl, Stendahl Gallery, Los Angeles, California, USA All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #126388Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 5d 2h
Low estimate
4 600 GBP

Mayan Ulua Valley Polychrome Cylinder - Feathered Deity

Pre-Columbian, Maya, Ulua Valley, Honduras, ca. 550 to 900 CE. A round-bottomed cylinder jar with a huge repeated motif of a feathered deity painted in fine-line black, dark brown, red, and orange on a creamy orange background. The deity has a fierce, geometric face with highly abstract features. The cylinder itself is rather unusual in being carinated in two places to divide its body into thirds. Size: 5.45" W x 6.25" H (13.8 cm x 15.9 cm)For the Maya, extraordinary painted ceramic vases like this example were gifted to elite individuals, akin to the gifts exchanged between high profile dignitaries today. Vases were a functional gift, created by artist/scribes who came from elite families and who took pains to recreate the stories of Mayan mythology and religion as well as to depict royal and godly personages in their artwork. This artwork reinforced the ruling ideology and reminded the viewer of what was valuable in Mayan society. Today, they teach us about the stories that were important to the Maya and also give us clues to how elite people lived and dressed. Scholars have painstakingly worked to decipher the meaning of the iconography and glyphs painted on cylinder jars and we know much more about them than we did even twenty years ago. The Ulua Valley is sometimes referred to as the Mesoamerican Frontier, the place where the lowlands of the Maya met the lower part of Central America and its different cultures. They are famous for producing marble and polychrome ceramic cylinders that were traded far and wide. Provenance: private D. C. collection, California, USA; D. C. is an Emmy Award winning Hollywood writer and Executive Producer, collected before 2000 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #126404Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 5d 2h
Low estimate
910 GBP

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Persian Bronze Bowl w/ Eagle Etching in Center
Ancient Near East, Achaemenid Persian Empire, ca. 550 to 330 BCE. A wonderful small round bowl with thin sides, a flat base, and no rim or foot. On the interior is an etching of an eagle with one leg striding forward. This bowl would have been used in a funerary context, perhaps to hold offerings or libations. The eagle, a symbol of royalty, suggests that this would have been a high status grave. Size: 6.45" W x 2" H (16.4 cm x 5.1 cm) Provenance: Ex-Private Orange County, CA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118251 Artemis Gallery LIVE
19th C. Large Burmese Gilt Wood Meditation Buddha
Southeast Asia, Burma (modern day Myanmar), ca. late 19th to early 20th century CE. A stunning gold gilded Buddha who sits with his hands in the Bhumisparsha or Earth touching mudra upon a pedestal most likely once inscribed with written prayers now showing a lovely patina and the remains of silver gilt, blue, and red pigments. The Bhumisparsha mudra is delineated with his right hand over the right knee reaching towards the ground and palm facing inward. His left hand lies in his lap with the palm upright. This mudra represents the moment of his awakening, as he defeated the demon Mara, and claimed the earth as his witness to his enlightenment. His face reveals wonderful attention to details, particularly the flame-like ushnisha, tightly delineated curls of hair, characteristically elongated earlobes signifiying wisdom and compassion as Buddha can hear all the cries of suffering throughout the world (another interpretation of this feature stems from his noble origin when Gautama's ears were stretched by the opulent ear ornaments he wore prior to denouncing his materialistic wealth), his tranquil close-eyed expression, and long sashed robes. Much original gilding is still evident on the Buddha and his pedestal. Simply stunning! Size: 9.375" W x 19" H (23.8 cm x 48.3 cm); 10.75" W x 22" H (27.3 cm x 55.9 cm) with stand Provenance: Ex-Private Boulder, CO collection acquired at Indochine Gallery All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #117809 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Orchid Island Wooden Canoe, Yami People
Orchid Island, Fomosa (present day Taiwan), Ca 1950. Carved wooden canoe in miniature form, with nicely decorated sides. 10-1/2" L x 5" H. Lucite stand. Wonderful decorative accent! Artemis Gallery LIVE
5 Guerrero Mezcala Greenstone Ear Spools
Pre-Columbian, Guerrero, Mexico, Mezcala culture, ca. 500 BCE to 500 CE. This is a collection of three greenstone ear spools/plugs, all with a flared flat trumpet shape. Only the most elite personages in Mesoamerican society were able to wear ear spools made of jadeite. Ancient Mesoamericans believed that ears were the conduits for spiritual energy, and so ear ornaments like this one took on significant meaning. Some scholars have argued that the stretching of earlobes -- done progressively through spool sizes to limit tearing and pain -- may have been a rite of passage from childhood to adulthood; ear spools may also have been thought of as an extension of the ear. Size: 2" W x 1" H (5.1 cm x 2.5 cm) Provenance: Ex - Private W. S. collection, Los Angeles, Ca All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #114284 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Large/Gorgeous Roman Glass Vessel
Rome, ca. 1st to 4th century CE. In a word, gorgeous, for its fabulous form, beautiful translucency and green hues, not to mention its superb condition. This vessel presents a near-spherical body with a dimpled bottom showing a nice broken pontil, this globular form leading to an elegantly flared neck that resolves to a thick rolled rim. A lovely example of free-blown ancient glass! Size: 5.25" in diameter x 6.125" H (13.3 cm x 15.6 cm)Glass blowing was invented in the Roman Empire around the end of the first century CE and revolutionized Roman household life. Suddenly glass was easy to produce, and Roman households rapidly replaced pottery with delicate, translucent glass. A vessel such as this one may have been used to hold olive oil, which the Romans used for everything -- cooking, lighting lamps, and personal hygiene. It has survived the intervening centuries nearly intact and is a beautiful reminder of the Roman past. Provenance: Ex-Henry & Gretchen Burnett Collection, Santa Barbara, CA All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #120042 Artemis Gallery LIVE
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Artemis Gallery LIVE
PO Box 714, Erie, CO 80516
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