Artemis Gallery LIVE

Artemis Gallery Live specialises in antiques, ancient and ethnographic art and they only sell authentic examples. All artefacts offered for sale are guaranteed ancient and authentic, and have been legally acquired and are legal to sell. The offer easy registration and accurate auction descriptions with professional photos for their online auctions.

Countries
  • USA
Objects "Artemis Gallery LIVE"

Achaemenid Three Part Bronze Belt Buckle

Ancient Near East, Achaemenid Persian Empire, ca. 550 to 330 BCE. A trio of cast bronze components that together make up a large, symmetrical belt buckle. Two are rectangular, with openwork designs studded with four round, raised bosses. The top and bottom of each have three small studs, presumably for attachment to fabric or leather. One end of each has two rectangular slots, again for attachment; the other end of each has a thick, round loop projecting perpendicular from the orientation of the rest of the piece. The two pieces are joined by an "S" form with a boss in the center that terminates in abstract, three-dimensional forms that resemble either the heads of snakes or opening flower buds. The terminals hook through the loops on the rectangular pieces. Comes displayed on custom stand. Size of each rectangular piece: 4" W x 2.5" H (10.2 cm x 6.4 cm); size of "S" hook: 1.95" L x 1.3" H (5 cm x 3.3 cm); size on stand: 9.1" L x 1.5" W x 3.9" H (23.1 cm x 3.8 cm x 9.9 cm)Plato described Achaemenid society as one whose flaunting of wealth was famous throughout the ancient world. A belt buckle this large would have been an excellent way to do this. Provenance: private New Jersey USA collection, acquired over twenty years ago All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #121651Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 15d 22h
Low estimate
780 GBP

10th C. Indian Sandstone Bas Relief - Hindu Deities

South Asia, India, ca. 10th century CE. A finely carved red sandstone bas relief most likely depicting semi-divine celestial attendants captured in a swaying pose with their faces looking left, perhaps toward a deity they are presenting. While their bodies appear to be nearly identical in pose and dress, their headdresses are distinct. Given this differentiation, another possibility is that this trio represents the three major Hindu deities: Brahma the creator, Vishnu the preserver, and Shiva the destroyer. An early mention of this sacred triad occurs in Kaladasa's poem entitled "Kumarasambhava" (Birth of the War God) dating back to ca. 4th to 5th century CE, and the famous Trimurti Temple dates to the beginning of the 8th century CE. Oftentimes these three gods are fused into a single form with three faces. When this happens, the avatar is known as Dattatreya. By depicting these three deities together, the iconography suggests that each deity in not one-dimensional - that Vishnu is not solely a preserver and Shiva not merely a destroyer for instance. A superb example of Hindu art replete with spiritual content, skillful technique, and impressive artistry. Custom, wood block stand. Size: relief itself measures 8.25" W x 10.5" H (21 cm x 26.7 cm); with stand 9.5" W x 13.5" H (24.1 cm x 34.3 cm) Provenance: Ex-Bill Freeman collection, Santa Fe, NM All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #117229Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 15d 22h
Low estimate
1 200 GBP

Stunning Greek Attic Blackware Kylix

Greek, Athens, ca. 525 to 475 BCE. This ceramic vessel is truly a work of art, with a perfectly round, deep bowl that stands on a round foot, and twin, delicate handles projecting from the lower body. The body has a scalloped design around the lower body and a series of concentric circles with tiny motifs inside of them that together look like the sun in tondo. The black glaze has a silvery, almost iridescent patina, and it was probably intended to look like a bronze vessel. Size: 8.1" L x 4.65" W x 2.45" H (20.6 cm x 11.8 cm x 6.2 cm)Cups like these were made in variety of materials - ceramic, bronze, silver, and even gold! They were a vital component of the symposium, the formal drinking party frequently enjoyed by elite Greek men. The kylix played a crucial role in the drinking game of kottabos, where players attempted to throw the portion of wine - usually the dregs - remaining in their kylikes to knock a bronze disc into a larger one. Many frescoes and ceramic paintings show men reclining, kylikes raised above their heads, caught in the act of playing ancient Greek beer pong. Provenance: private Orange County, California collection acquired before 2000 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #121929Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 15d 22h
Low estimate
780 GBP

15th C. Indian Stone Crocodile - Makara

Central Asia, South India, ca. 15th century CE. Expertly carved from a single large stone of rosy beige hues with some remains of red and white pigment, a dramatic crocodile effigy - with meticulously delineated gnashing teeth, bulging eyes, scaly skin, toed feet, and pointy tail - probably referring to a Makara ("sea dragon" or "water monster" in Sanskrit) - the pet and Vahana (vehicle) of the river goddess Ganga of Hindu mythology, who personifies the purity and piety of the Ganges River (the most sacred river of Hindu mythology) and purportedly descends to earth to rinse away humankind's sins. A row of Makara are typically featured on the exteriors of Hindu temples, running along a wall or serving as a handrail. As a vahana ("that which pulls"), the Makara is sometimes depicted mounted by a deity, at the deity's side, or as a symbolic attribute of the deity, in this case it would be Ganga. A very special piece, boasting skillful technique and layers of symbolic meaning. Size: 14.25" L x 9.5" W x 6.5" H (36.2 cm x 24.1 cm x 16.5 cm) Provenance: Ex Allen Davis Collection, Sante Fe; Acquired at Europa Fine Art Gallery Summerland, CA All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #121121Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 15d 22h
Low estimate
9 300 GBP

Collection Native American Inuit Bone Art Stone Points

North America, Native American, Arctic and sub-arctic region, Inuit peoples, stone points from ca. 5000 BCE to 1600 CE; ivory from ca. 19th to early 20th century CE. A fascinating collection from one of the most remote and unique world cultures, containing four chert stone points, two bear claws, and eighteen small walrus ivory and bone carvings. Size of box: 8.25" W x 12.25" H (21 cm x 31.1 cm)The four chert points are of different styles - one appears to be a drill, the other three points, one with a concave base, the other two stemmed. Two are made of a slate-grey chert and the others are of a more brown/red chert; none appear to be from the same source. Chert was a highly desirable source for stole tools, easily knapped into sharp points and predictable in how it would fracture during the knapping process. Sources of chert were rare and valued, and the stones to make these tools may have traveled hundreds of miles. The carvings are largely zoomorphic, with several representing birds - either their full bodies or their faces, including an excellent owl face. There is also a turtle, a fish, a musk ox, four human faces, and a variety of square forms, all pierced for suspension. One of the face pendants is a dramatic mask with one side of the face with a wide open eye and upturned mouth, and the other side a closed eye and downturned mouth. Many of these capture both naturalistic and abstract features to convey their meaning; the variety of bird heads, in particular, show a keen appreciation for observing animals commonly seen in the Arctic.Walrus Ivory. Bidders should be aware of the changing laws regarding commercialization of ivory and other product containing endangered species both on the Federal and State levels. This lot will be accompanied by a signed affidavit from the client that this object was in the United States prior to January 18, 1990, and is to the best of their knowledge and ability made prior to February 26, 1976 in accordance with Federal law. Ivory cannot be shipped out of the United States. Provenance: Ex-Private Orange, County CA collection acquired between 1990 and 1995 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119971Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 15d 22h
Low estimate
1 600 GBP

Greek Black-Figure Pottery Kylix

Greece, Athens, ca. 5th to 4th century BCE. This is a delicate Attic kylix (drinking cup) with finely shaped squared-off handles, a wide, evenly sloping bowl, and a delicate round foot joined to the body by a narrow leg. A glossy, almost silvery black glaze rings the interior, leaving a buff circle in tondo. On the underside of the bowl is a fern motif. The foot and undersides of the handles are also painted black. Size: 9.45" L x 7.5" W x 2.7" H (24 cm x 19 cm x 6.9 cm)Cups like these were made in a variety of materials - terracotta, like this one, bronze, silver, and even gold! They were a vital component of the symposium, the formal drinking party frequently enjoyed by elite Greek men. The kylix played a crucial role in the drinking game of kottabos, where players attempted to throw the portion of wine - usually the dregs - left in their kylikes to knock a bronze disc into a larger one. Many frescoes and ceramic paintings show men reclining, kylikes raised above their heads, caught in the act of playing ancient Greek beer pong. Other kylikes were made specifically to be buried in tombs as offerings - probably the fate of this particular example. Provenance: Ex-Private East Coast, USA Collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #120745Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 15d 22h
Low estimate
930 GBP

Luristan Bronze Pommel Dagger - Double Ear

Ancient Near East, Luristan (sometimes called Amlash), ca. 1200 to 800 BCE. A fine bronze dagger of the "double ear" pommel style, made by highly trained urban artisans using the lost wax casting technique. The blade was cast first, and then the handle was cast onto it. The handle is of the inlay style and has two remaining bronze pins (of three) for holding the inlaid material (bone, ivory, or wood) in place. Size: 1.55" W x 13.25" H (3.9 cm x 33.7 cm); height on stand: 14.8" (37.6 cm).The dagger has a tapering blade with a slight penannular rib and square shoulders. The flanged hilt has a circular guard and terminates in the highly distinctive double-eared pommel.The "double ear" style - with both bronze and iron blades - has been excavated from graves in southern Azerbaijan, the Talish and Dailaman regions of northwest Iran, and the urban sites of Geoy Tepe and Hasanlu, also in northwestern Iran. Another, with both bronze pommel and blade, was pulled from the Caspian Sea, where it may have been thrown as an offering. Ancient Iran was a culture rich in dramatic bronze creations. A class of nomadic horse lords and ladies commissioned bronze items from artisans in urban centers. Cast in a single piece using the lost wax casting technique, this weapon and ones like it ultimately came to grace the graves of elite warriors. Provenance: Ex-Kavet Collection, Massachusetts, acquired 1976 at Harmer Rooke Gallery, NYC All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #120295Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 15d 22h
Low estimate
930 GBP

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19th C. African Cast Copper Katanga Cross
Back at auction due to fraudulent bidder from 6/2/2016 sale… Africa, Southeast Region of Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire), Kasai River region, Katanga, ca. late 19th to early 20th century CE. A classic cast copper X-shaped ingot referred to as a Katanga Cross, also called a handa, from the rich copper mining region of Katanga in the southeastern area of the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire) along the Kasai River. Over the course of several centuries, such crosses have served as currency and exchange in several Central African societies. The peoples of the Congo valued non-ferrous metals - copper, lead, and tin - quite highly, almost as valuable as precious ivory. Katanga Crosses signified wealth and status and were used as dowry payments and in trade. According to experts, in the early 20th century, one cross might be exchanged for a half dozen chickens, eight pounds of rubber, two lengths of fabric, or six axes. Beyond this, they have been discovered in burial sites and thus are commonly associated with funerary rituals. Ingots have also appeared in different shapes, have been known to weigh anywhere from around one half pound to some two and half pounds, and have demonstrated a range of craftmanship and artistry, depending on which kingdoms or chieftainships created them. These differences have made it possible to determine the extent of the various kingdoms more precisely. A superb example on a custom, museum-quality stand. Size: 7" W x 8.75" H (17.8 cm x 22.2 cm) Provenance: Ex-private midwestern collector All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #113992 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Pre-Columbian Taino Stone Seated Figure
Pre-Columbian, Caribbean/Florida, Taino people, 1000 to 1500 CE. A stone carving of a seated figure with gaping eyes and a skull-like face. If it hadn't been made by people in the pre-Columbian New World, it would resemble a lowland gorilla. Incised details mark out the fingers and the facial features. Size: 5.75" L x 3.7" W x 7.1" H (14.6 cm x 9.4 cm x 18 cm)So what does the skull have to do with it? Putting ourselves into the mindset of the Taino, we should understand that death was seen as a transitory period; the boundaries between life and death seem to have felt more porous to the Taino than they do to us today. Shamans, for example, are often depicted as skeletal figures, perhaps because of their requirements to fast and vomit in order to ingest the chemicals that would put them into a spiritual state. This imagery, with its exaggerated, skull eye sockets and gaping mouth, is probably designed to show a shaman breaching the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead. Provenance: Ex-Kentucky collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118217 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Milford Zornes Watercolor - Figures in Mexico
Milford Zornes (American, 1908-2008), "Figures in Mexico" watercolor on paper, 2003 CE. An intriguing Milford Zornes watercolor depicting three abstract figures, the central figure wearing a wide-brimmed sombrero, painted with an expressive, loose brushstroke in warm reds and umbers, signed and dated in black ink on the lower right. Zornes was an American watercolor artist who is widely revered as a leader of the California Style watercolor movement that began in the 1920s. Zornes' style departed from the traditional use of watercolors. Rather than adding color to detailed pencil drawings, Zornes applied transparent washes of color to large sheets of paper and allowed the white to show through using this white space to define shapes as demonstrated in this example. A wonderful example created by Milford Zornes, an American treasure. Follow this link to watch a wonderful video of Milford Zornes in his home studio in 2006 - (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehte4qAxK_c) Size: 7.625" L x 8.375" W (19.4 cm x 21.3 cm)Zornes was educated at the Otis Art Institute were he studied with Millard Sheets and F. Tolles Chamberlin. He later taught at Otis as well, making a name for himself as a talented educator. Highlights of his career include a one-man exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. a ND having one of his watercolors selected by President and Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt to hang in the White House. In addition to being a prolific watercolorist, Zornes created murals under President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal program for post offices in El Campo, Texas as well as his hometown of Claremont, California during the era of the Great Depression. Zornes was also an active member of the California Water Color Society, becoming president of that organization in 1942. Zorne's works have been acquired by esteemed institutions including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the White House, and the Library of Congress Collection. Provenance: Ex-private Los Angeles County collection. Certificate of Authenticity from Anderson Art Gallery, Sunset Beach, CA. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #117998 Artemis Gallery LIVE
19th c. Italian Reliquary St Alphonsus Maria de Liguori
Italy, ca. 19th century CE. This is a small antique tin reliquary in circular form with a thread and red wax seal across its back (denoting that the relic remains). Under glass is a simple printed engraved image of the Saint, Alphonsus Maria de' Liguori (1696-1787), an Italian Catholic bishop and theological writer who was canonized in 1839 and is the patron saint of confessors. A small reliquary like this one was probably manufactured to be sold as a souvenir of a pilgrimage. Size: 1.5" W x 0.55" H (3.8 cm x 1.4 cm) Provenance: Ex-Historia Gallery, Santa Monica, CA. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #109644 Artemis Gallery LIVE
19th C. Mexican Retablo La Sagrada Familia, ex-Historia
Latin America, Mexico, ca. 1875 CE. A sweet and petite antique Mexican retablo depicting the Holy Family (Mary, Joseph, and the Christ Child) finely painted in vivid hues against a golden background. Mary grasps the Child's wrist, steadying him as he toddles, and he holds a miniature cross subtly foreshadowing the Crucifixion. The Holy Mother is dressed in traditional blue and red. Her head is tilted lovingly toward him, and her expression is peaceful and serene. St. Joseph, garbed in traditional green and yellow, carries a flowering staff. Rays of light project over the Christ Child symbolizing his holiness. Size: 6-3/4"x 4-1/2"Icons like these were placed above household altars to venerate the saints and members of the Holy Family (retablo literally means "behind the altar"). Retablo became very popular in the 19th century due to the introduction of tin as an affordable medium. Provenance: Ex-Historia Antiques, James Caswell, Santa Monica, CA. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. #109735 Artemis Gallery LIVE
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Artemis Gallery LIVE
PO Box 714, Erie, CO 80516
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