Artemis Gallery LIVE

Artemis Gallery Live specialises in antiques, ancient and ethnographic art and they only sell authentic examples. All artefacts offered for sale are guaranteed ancient and authentic, and have been legally acquired and are legal to sell. The offer easy registration and accurate auction descriptions with professional photos for their online auctions.

Countries
  • USA
Objects "Artemis Gallery LIVE"

Maya Carved Jade Warrior Pendant

Pre-Columbian, Mayan territories, ca. 550 to 900 CE. A finely carved jade pendant of rich olive green hues with black and brown inclusions depicting a standing warrior holding a spear in his hand toward the left. He is highly decorated, wearing a feathered headdress with a 'beaded' headband, a 'beaded' pectoral, an ear ornament, and a loin belt - clearly an important figure given his garb. As was the custom, the Mayan artisan skillfully worked with the natural shape of the stone rather than lose any precious surface area. Laterally perforated behind the head for suspension. Custom stand. Size: 1.375" W x 2.75" H (3.5 cm x 7 cm); 3.75" H (9.5 cm) on included custom stand.Jade was revered by the Maya not only for its beauty, but also because it had spiritual power - it was believed to be the embodiment of the wind and the "breath" that formed the Maya soul. In addition, scholars argue that its color was associated with water and vegetation. While the Maya used jade to create impressive jewelry, we also know that they placed jade beads in the mouths of the dead, perhaps as a means of extending the circle of life. Furthermore, many scholars have argued that the demand for jade contributed to the rise of long distance trading networks as well as the rise of urban centers in ancient Mesoamerica. Provenance: private New York, New York, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #127149Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 11d 11h
Low estimate
1 800 GBP

20th C. Ethiopian Necklace w/ Coptic Cross, Glass Beads

**Originally Listed At $250**Eastern Africa, Ethiopia, ca. 20th century CE. A brass cross in the traditional and distinctive Coptic Ethiopian style, with three arms in the form of clubs and an openwork pattern at its center and on the fourth, upper arm. The surface is lightly incised and stamped. A heavy loop for suspension is part of the top. It is attached to a necklace strung with thick glass beads in colors ranning from a bright blue to black. Two red cylindrical beads are at the end near the tie that holds the necklace together. There are 118 beads total. Size: 26.6" L of necklace (67.6 cm); cross is: 1.95" W x 2.6" H (5 cm x 6.6 cm); largest bead is 0.3" W (0.8 cm).Ethiopian Christianity is one of the most distinctive traditions of the religion, founded much earlier than Christianity in most of the rest of Africa thanks to missions from the 1st century until the 4th century, when St. Frumentius of Tyre converted King Ezana. As a result, Ethiopia developed a distinctly African form of Christianity. Geometric designs are characteristic of Ethiopian art, the intertwining lattice style possesses layers of meaning and suggestions of order particular to the culture, symbolizing eternal life and relating to the nature of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church. Provenance: private Ventura County, California, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #125749Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 8d 12h
Low estimate
360 GBP

19th C. Russian Icon w/ Brass Oklad - Pantokrator

**Originally Listed At $500**Eastern Europe, Russia, ca. 1850 CE. Finely painted in egg tempera and varnish on linen and wood and covered with a beautiful brass oklad (riza or oklad, literally means trimming), an icon of Christ Pantokrator, Lord of the Universe, holding an open holy Gospel in his left hand, the fingers of his right hand giving benediction, arranged to form the initials of Christ’s monogram, IC XC T. The oklad embellishing the image with a meticulously cut and engraved nimbus, as well as intricately engraved lovely robes, the open book, and border adorned with stylized geometric patterns. Set in a custom, ornate gilded frame. Size: 17.75" L x 15.875" W (45.1 cm x 40.3 cm) framed; visible image measures 8.375" L x 6.625" W (21.3 cm x 16.8 cm)The oklad or riza, sometimes referred to as a revetment in English, is a metal cover, in this case brass, that not only protects the icon, but also serves to honor or venerate the figure(s) depicted on the icon. Oklads are usually adorned with repousse work and pierced to reveal elements of the underlying painting. This artisan truly knew how to work with brass in a manner that both complements and uplifts the painted image.Icons (icon means "image" in Greek) are sacred objects within the Eastern Orthodox Christian tradition. Found in homes as well as churches, these painted images depict holy persons and saints as well as illustrate scenes from the Scriptures. Some icons, like this example, are encased in precious metal covers (oklads). Icons are not worshiped, but are instead venerated for their ability to focus the power of an individual's prayer to God. As such they are truly "windows into heaven." Provenance: private Ventura County, California, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #129108Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 8d 12h
Low estimate
640 GBP

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19th C. Mexican Wood Santo - St. Vincent de Paul
New World, Spanish Colonial, Mexico, ca. 19th century CE. A sweet wooden santo figure of St. Vincent de Paul. He stands holding the hand of a small child, both wearing robes of a creamy hues with gold trim. The saint also wears a heavy gold and red cloth wrapped around one shoulder and his waist. He holds a Bible in his free hand and stands atop a rounded and tiered pedestal. Size: 4.75" L x 5.5" W x 17.5" H (12.1 cm x 14 cm x 44.4 cm)St. Vincent de Paul (1581 - 1660 CE) was a French priest who dedicated himself to the poor. He is the founder of the Sisters of Charity and is often depicted with a child in his arms or at his feet. Santos played an important role in bringing the Catholic Church to the New World with the Spanish colonists. These religious figures were hand-carved and often furnished with crowns, jewels, and other accessories, usually funded by religious devotees, and were used as icons to explain the major figures - Mary, Christ, and the saints - to new, indigenous converts. Likewise, they served as a connection to the Old World for Spanish colonists far from home. They became a folk art tradition in the Spanish New World, from modern day Guatemala to as far north as New Mexico and Colorado. Many of them were lovingly cared for over the years, with repairs and paint added as they aged, and played an active part for a long time in the religious life of their communities. Provenance: Ex-Francis & Lilly Robicsek Collection, Charlotte, NC All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #120696 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Incredible Tricertops Fossilized Brow Horn
North America, late Cretaceous Period, ca. 68 to 66 million years ago. Wow! An incredible fossilized brow horn from a triceratops (Triceratops horridus), one of the classic, best-known dinosaurs. First found in 1887 west of Denver, Colorado, USA, in the town of Morrison by the English priest and fossil hunter Arthur Lakes and named by Yale professor Othniel Charles Marsh, these large horned animals were initially mistaken for a form of bison before they realized they were a type of dinosaur known as a ceratopsian. The triceratops skull was heavy and distinctive: with three horns, a parrot-like beak, and a frill that could reach three feet wide, it was one of the largest skulls known from any land animal. Size: 12" W x 27" L (30.5 cm x 68.6 cm) Size: 12" W x 27" L (30.5 cm x 68.6 cm); 20" H (50.8 cm) on included custom stand. Interestingly, most horned animals travel in herds, but triceratops has been found more frequently in individual contexts. Puncture marks on the fossil frills of males of the species shown that they used their horns to fight each other, with some paleontologists believing that this was done to impress females. Finds of blood vessels throughout the horns and frills of these animals suggest that they were not just weapons, but were also used for identification of individuals, much like the antlers and horns of modern species like reindeer and mountain goats. These horns grew throughout the life of the animal, especially in childhood and adolescence, along with the skull, which went from one foot long in babies to six feet long in adults. The horns on the babies were only about an inch long before growing to be as impressive as this example! Provenance: private United States collection, acquired in Montana, USA on private property All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #127466 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Colima Pottery Vessel - Animal Form (Bear / Dog)
Pre-Columbian, West Mexico, Colima, ca. 300 BCE to 300 CE. Large and very attractive pottery urn. Sitting on four tappered legs in hour-glass shape with animal head - possibly dog or bear - emerging from one side acting as a spout. Nice light reddish burnished finish. Size: 9.5" W x 9.25" H (24.1 cm x 23.5 cm). Provenance: Ex-Bill Freeman collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #116802 Artemis Gallery LIVE
20th C. Nigerian Igbo Carved Wooden Mask Head
**First Time At Auction**Africa, Nigeria, northeastern Igbo peoples (Ezza or Izzi), ca. early to mid 20th century CE. A hand-carved wood anthropomorphic headpiece (ogbodo) with a detachable and unusual branching hair ornament. The facial expression is fierce, with large eyes and a mouth full of teeth. It has traditional ichi facial markings at the temples and on the forehead, which represent the practice of scarification that marks Igbo individuals, usually men, as nobility. White pigment marks the hair and mouth. The head is perched on a conical piece of wood with holes drilled around its base for attaching it to cloth to be worn over the face during a masquerade. Size: 5.6" L x 4.7" W x 18" H (14.2 cm x 11.9 cm x 45.7 cm) Provenance: ex-Adeon Gallery, Chicago, IL, USA acquired prior to 1970 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #121205 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Taino Manatee Bone Spatula w/ Skeletal Form
Pre-Columbian, Caribbean/Florida, Taino people, ca. 1000 to 1500 CE. Hand-carved from the bone of a marine mammal, probably a manatee, this is a bone spatula or vomiting stick, a key part of the Cohoba ritual. The spatula is in the form of a leering skeleton with a highly abstract, stylized body, huge empty eye sockets, and a spiked crown. Taino spirituality, which focused on the spirit of the ancestors and the god of cassava, their primary crop, was mediated by a class of priests (bohiques), who often engaged in the taking of hallucinogenic drugs to aid in rituals and ceremonies. The Cohoba ritual required this type of special object, designed to induce vomiting to help a shaman purge themselves - this, coupled with fasting, allowed the shamans to have the most pure high from the Cohoba powder. Many of these vomiting sticks were made from the rib bones of West Indian Manatee. Comes with custom stand. Size: 1.4" W x 5" H (3.6 cm x 12.7 cm); height on stand: 5.65" (14.4 cm)So what does the skeleton have to do with it? Putting ourselves into the mindset of the Taino, we should understand that death was seen as a transitory period; the boundaries between life and death seem to have felt more porous to the Taino than they do to us today. Shamans, for example, are often depicted as skeletal figures, perhaps because of their requirements to fast and vomit in order to ingest the chemicals that would put them into a spiritual state. This imagery, with its exaggerated, teeth-filled mouth, is probably designed to show a shaman breaching the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead. Provenance: Whisnant Gallery, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, acquired over twenty years ago All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #123401 Artemis Gallery LIVE

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Artemis Gallery LIVE
PO Box 714, Erie, CO 80516