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Objects "Guernsey's"

Allan Dulles, CIA Director, Memo Praising F.G. Powers

Inter-office memo signed by Clarence Johnson regarding remarks made by Allen Dulles, the Director of the CIA from 1953-1961. The 11.5 x 9.5'' framed note contains a typed up excerpt from a speech Dulles made to the Lockheed Management Club in defense of Francis Gary Powers. It is signed in black ink by Johnson.Clarence Johnson was the Vice President of Advanced Development Projects at the Lockheed Corporation, the company that developed the U-2. Johnson excerpts Dulles' speech in which he discusses his admiration of Powers' actions during his mission. Powers climbed out of his U-2 aircraft in mid-air as it hurtled towards the ground after being hit by a Soviet missile. He survived but was criticized for not using a "suicide pill" he had been supplied with. However, in the memo, dated June 1964 - two years after Francis Gary Powers was released back into US custody after being held in a Soviet prison - Dulles shames detractors and states that Powers deserves the respect of his country for his performance in a dangerous situation. Clarence Johnson sent the letter to Powers as a token of commemoration and respect for his valiant actions. Francis Gary Powers was a distinguished pilot for the CIA's U-2 program during the height of the Cold War. Powers was arrested after his spy plane was shot down while flying a high-risk reconnaissance mission over Soviet airspace. To learn more about Powers' astounding story of survival, please visit www.guernseys.comThese items provided directly by Mr. Powers' son, expert public speaker on the U-2 Incident and Cold War History, Francis Gary Powers Jr.Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 15d 3h
Low estimate
740 GBP

Place Cards from Khrushchev's Dinner with Eisenhower

Four dining place cards from the visit of Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev with President Eisenhower at Camp David on September 25-27, 1959. Made of heavy-duty card stock with gold-flaked angular edges and an embossed golden Seal of the United States, these 2.25 x 4'' place cards were present for the official dinner served for the two premier leaders along with Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko and U.S. Secretary of State Christian Herter. Beneath the embossed seal in black printed ink are the words "His Excellency" then the corresponding names of the guests, "Nikita S. Khrushchev," two "Andrei A. Gromyko," cards and "The Ambassador of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics." Khrushchev's U.S. visit resulted in an informal agreement with President Eisenhower that there would be no firm deadline over Berlin, but that there would be a four-power summit to try to resolve the issue. Having left the U.S. in high spirits, Khrushchev returned to the U.S.S.R convinced that he had achieved a strong personal relationship with Eisenhower (who in fact was unimpressed by the Soviet leader) and that he could achieve d_tente with the Americans. At the end of their two-day visit, Eisenhower and Khrushchev released a joint statement saying their discussions were useful and contributed to a better understanding between the two countries. In the months following his visit, Khrushchev would occasionally refer to the "Spirit of Camp David". When Eisenhower was asked about what that meant, he replied: "I must say I have never used it" and that it "must mean simply that it looks like we can talk together without being mutually abusive."These items come directly from the Hirschy family. Lieutenant Hirschy was Supply and Logistics Officer for the Military Aides to the President and Officer-in-Charge of the Navy Mess in the White House during both the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. His duties also included taking care of the President’s needs on overseas trips, aboard the presidential yachts and at Camp David. Lt. Hirschy served in the White House from May 1, 1961 through May 31, 1965.Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 15d 3h
Low estimate
590 GBP

Kennedy and Krushchev Drawing by David Levine

“Kennedy and Khrushchev,” original drawing by David Levine (1926-2009), ink on paper, signed and dated (at lower right): D. Levine 63, 11.2 x 9.75 x 1 " Framed, 4.5 x 5.87" Unframed.This witty, yet serious, drawing by David Levine pointedly captures the conclusion of President John F Kennedy and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev’s two-day summit in Vienna in June, 1961. These leaders of the two superpowers of the Cold War era met to discuss numerous issues in the relationship between their two countries. The two world leaders are shown here battered and bruised, each sporting a black eye and a bandaged forehead, but with their arms around each other – apparently signaling a peaceful ending to what was reported as having been a frustrating, difficult, and ultimately disappointing meeting.David Levine was an American artist and illustrator best known for his caricatures in The New York Review of Books. In his political work, especially, his portraits betrayed the mind of an artist concerned about the world in which he lived. Levine’s successful career as a caricaturist and illustrator took root in the early 1960s, when he started working for Esquire. He began contributing cover portraits and interior illustrations to The New York Review of Books in 1963, its first year of publication. He contributed more than 3,800 drawings to The New York Review. Over the years he did 1,000 or so more for Esquire; almost 100 for Time magazine, including a number of covers; and dozens over all for New Yorker magazine, the New York Times, the Washington Post, Rolling Stone and other publications.Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 15d 3h
Low estimate
2 600 GBP

FG Powers letter to his wife with Kennedy Reference #10

Francis Gary Powers' letter to his wife, Barbara Powers, with John F. Kennedy references. Powers wrote this letter during his sentence at Vladamir Prison. He was sentenced to prison after his U-2 intelligence aircraft was shot down over Soviet airspace. The handwritten letter measures 10 x 8.5" and contains its original 4.5 x 6" envelope, addressed to Mrs. Barbara Powers. It has two original Soviet stamps.The pages and envelope are all written in blue ink and remain in pristine condition. Return address "Mr. F. G. Powers Box 5110/1 OD-1 Moscow, USSR. Included with the letter is a slip of paper that looks to be cut from a newspaper, that reads, "FOOTNOTE: While you're making out your Christmas cards, you might remember to send one to Francis Gary Powers, c/o American Embassy, Moscow. Let him know that U-2 haven't forgotten." It is circled in pencil with handwritten notes in blue ink below.In his letter, numbered ten at the top left corner, Powers speaks of his mental state and his desire to be released and come home. He writes, "I have not given up hope yet, but maybe it is too much to expect the Soviet Government to release me." John F. Kennedy's new administration was, understandably, of much interest to Powers. In this letter Powers writes, "Kennedy...seems sincere in his discussions to improve relations between all countries...he will be met with opposition." This is a historic letter which gives insight into the mindset of an American prisoner in the Soviet Union during one of the most chaotic eras in US history. Francis Gary Powers was a distinguished pilot for the CIA's U-2 program during the height of the Cold War. Powers was arrested after his spy plane was shot down while flying a high-risk reconnaissance mission over Soviet airspace. To learn more about Powers' astounding story of survival, please visit www.guernseys.comThese items provided directly by Mr. Powers' son, expert public speaker on the U-2 Incident and Cold War History, Francis Gary Powers Jr.Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 15d 3h
Low estimate
4 400 GBP

Naval Officer Henry Hirschy's Sword

The United States Navy Issued Ceremonial Sword of Lieutenant Henry E. Hirschy Jr. Plaque: approx: 10 x 10''. Sword case: 39.5''. Sheath: 32.5''. Blade: 31''. Hilt: 5.5''This sword was affixed to President Kennedy's catafalque, which was originally built as the stand to hold the casket of President Abraham Lincoln. The catafalque is a simple bier of rough pine boards nailed together and covered with black cloth.The single-edged carbon steel blade of this sword is elaborately etched with decorative patterns. Directly below the grip, a six-pointed star and the word "Proved" are etched, a requirement for all U. S. military swords signifying that the blade meets the current military specifications. Etched on the verso, below the grip, are the name and logo of the company that made the sword, Hilborn-Hamberger Inc. New York, above which is incised the word "Germany." The white shark skin grip is bound with brass wire and the heavy brass handle is wrapped with an elaborate gold braid, from which hangs a braid-wrapped tassel, known as a sword knot. The sword's blade is encased in a protective black scabbard with elaborate brass fittings and tip.The sword and scabbard are mounted on a shield-shaped wooden plaque. Affixed to the plaque is a medallion of the Great Seal mounted on a white ground and an inscribed brass plate which reads: "This sword, belonging to Lieutenant Henry E. Hirschy, Jr, Supply Corps, United States Navy, Supply Officer for the Naval Aides to the President, rested on the catafalque of the late President John F. Kennedy in the East Room of the White House, Washington D.C., during the thirty-day mourning period (24 November through 23 December 1963)."Henry E. Hirschy, Jr was a Navy Lieutenant at the time of President Kennedy's assassination, working as Supply and Logistics Officer for the Military Aides to the President and Officer-in-Charge of the Navy Mess in the White House. His duties also included taking care of the President's needs on overseas trips, aboard the presidential yachts and at Camp David. Lt. Hirschy's daily responsibilities included making sure the Presidential Seal was placed wherever the President was slated to speak, making provisions for state dinners, and ensuring his horsehair mattress, alcoholic beverages, Cuban cigars from Dunhill in New York, his custom rocking and office chairs and other personal items were taken along on presidential trips. Lieutenant Hirschy served in the White House from May 1, 1961 through May 31, 1965 for both President Kennedy and President Lyndon B. Johnson.Following President Kennedy's assassination, Jacqueline Kennedy requested two swords to be displayed on President Kennedy's catafalque and received swords from Lt. Henry Hirschy and Officer Jack Cutcomb. The two swords guarded President Kennedy's coffin, in the East Room, for two days, until the Capitol Rotunda was prepared for his lying in state. After President Kennedy's burial the two swords remained on the catafalque in the East Room for the remaining thirty day mourning period serving as a representation of President Kennedy's coffin. When Lt. Hirschy went to retrieve his sword from the White House, Jackie Kennedy was hesitant and wanted to keep both swords for herself to honor her late husband. While Hirschy understood the widow's reasoning behind this, he insisted that he retain his Naval Officer's sword, which he did. In the words of the late Lieutenant Henry E. Hirschy, Jr.: "I figured I'd be in trouble but there were no repercussions... you don't cross swords with Jackie!"Includes a framed photograph of showing the swords in place on President Kennedy's catafalque. The sword belonging to Lt. Hirschy is the one shown with the handle on the right.Guernsey's is honored to be representing the Family of Lieutenant Henry E. Hirschy, Jr. in offering this historic artifact.Read more

  • USAUSA
  • 15d 3h
Low estimate
148 000 GBP

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