We have selected three works which delve into the effects of the Anthropocene period in which we live in, the human experience and solitude.

Wilfred Pritchard

Wilfred Pritchard, Hard Labour, bronze and cast iron lawn roller, unique, H 134cm, W 180cm, D 60cm Wilfred Pritchard, Hard Labour, bronze and cast iron lawn roller, unique, H 134cm, W 180cm, D 60cm

Witty, macabre and controversial: all words which best describe the works of Wilfred Pritchard. The skeleton figure is a recurring theme in Pritchard's work, placing it in comical and unusual situations, such as mowing the lawn, as we see in the piece up for auction at Criterion.

pblot.php Wilfred Pritchard, A Load of Old Bollocks

His play on words as well as play on fears have intrigued collectors over the years. In 2007, this piece entitled A Load of Old Bollocks sold for over £6 000. The piece is quite literally a teak cart of bronze testicles, highlighting how Pritchard's humour in ingrained in his works. Check out more realised prices for Wilfred Pritchard here.

Glen Morris

Glen Morris, Solitude, carved pitch pine and steel, Unique, H 165cm, W 153cm, D 185cm Glen Morris, Solitude, carved pitch pine and steel, Unique, H 165cm, W 153cm, D 185cm

Works by Glen Morris explore the tenuous and ephemeral nature of beauty and our human response to it. His work is very heavily influenced by the Anthropocene period in which we live in, how the passing of time as well as human behaviour has a direct effect on the ever-changing face of the planet.

Morris uses the technique of carving stone as a means of using material with associations of ancient time and slow erosion. The sculptor is inspired by the juxtaposition of beauty and harshness of the environment in the far north as well as by the narrative work of the Inuit peoples.

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One of Morris' most recent works in the U.K. is Lost Comrades, which stands at Dyffryn Gardens near Cardiff. The piece pays remembrance to the lives lost since the 'war to end all wars.' The chief element of a butterfly egg references the frailty of life and the transient, ephemeral beauty yet to emerge.

The sculpture, which took 300 hours to carve and weighs about 250 kilos, comprises of 187 lead Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary butterflies, a threatened and declining species.

It is said that in breaks between shelling on the battlefield in the Somme, when silence prevailed, birdsong filled the air and butterflies fluttered over the trenches. Some soldiers believed that these represented the lost souls of their comrades. These butterflies help to reflect the contrast between the destruction of the battlefield and the fragile beauty of the natural world.

Guy Buseyne

Guy Buseyne, The Wall, Bronze, signed and numbered from an edition of 49, H 169cm, W 141cm Guy Buseyne, The Wall, Bronze, signed and numbered from an edition of 49, H 169cm, W 141cm

Guy Buseyne began his career in the publishing business and, later, as a graphic designer. He went on to study the craft of making furniture, which ignited a passion for interior design. To broaden his knowledge he started a two year education in arts, specialising in ceramics which led him to acquire skills in sculpting. Buseyne is now one of the designers of GND.

His pieces often feature a single subject, sat alone in a stance that suggests they are in deep thought. Their haunting presence and beauty lend themselves beautifully to public gardens. Editions of The Wall, which is up for auction at Criterion, have sold for £6 000. Check out more realised prices for Guy Buseyne here.

Viewings will take place on 22nd, 24th and 25th July, 2017. See here for more details.

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