WA

The brooch that hides a timepiece is from one of the world's most exclusive jewellers. Made in platinum it depicts a jardinière with a large old-cut diamond, pear shaped diamonds, baguette, navette and fancy cut diamonds as well as diamonds flanked by two large emeralds and smaller emeralds in the crown, as well as a hidden dial. The dial face is marked Tiffany & Co whilst the timepiece is signed Patek Philippe. One of the world's most renowned jewellers Tiffany & Co were founded in 1837 and opened their doors on Broadway in New York, then under the name Tiffany, and has since provided the world with exceptionally exclusive jewellery.

WA1

The brooch that is up for auction at W.A. Bolins once belonged to Estelle Bernadotte af Wisborg, born in 1904 the daughter to American industrialist Edward Manville and Estelle, née Romaine. Edward Manville attended Yale University with Charles Tiffany, so it is no wonder that many pieces from Tiffany & Co found their way into the Manville family. In 1928 Estelle Manville married the Swedish diplomat Count Folke Bernadotte af Wisborg, the son of Gustav V's younger brother Prince Oscar and therefore cousin to Gustav IV Adolf. Folke Bernadotte af Wisborg was tragically murdered in Jersusalem in 1948. The piece has been handed down within the family until now. It has an estimate of $20 300.

WA2

This magnificent pearl set was made  for Anni-Frid, Princess Reuss von Plauen, who is perhaps more known as one of the members of the world famous pop group ABBA. The collier and bangle were designed and made by W.A. Bolin in Stockholm in 1995 in 18k white gold with cultured pearls and diamonds.

Pearls

The collier is a choker or "collier de chien", made up of 5 strands of pearls threaded on elastic cord with diamonds between the pearls. The diamonds sparkle as the wearer moves creating a very beautiful effect. The 5 strands of Akoya pearls descend in size, going from a diameter of 6.5 mm in the upper row to 7.5 mm in the bottom row. The bangle is built in the same fashion and quality, the difference is that neither the pearls or diamonds change in size. The work for this unique set required extreme precision when combining the different sizes of pearls. The jewellery is also included in Magdalena Ribbing's book "Jewellery & silver for tsars, queens and others" from 1996. The set has en estimate of $60 860.

WA4

Another item of fine provenance is the aquamarine Fabergé brooch in the original box, gifted around 1900 to Gabrielle Carlsund, wife of the Nobel Industries chief engineer Anton Carlsund. Emmanuel Nobel originally bequeathed the brooch, as Gabrielle often associated with the Nobel family, which is also how she met Anton. The piece has been handed down within the Carlsund family. It has en estimate of $13 200.

WA5

Cartier celebrated their 100th anniversary this year with pomp and circumstance. For many years panther jewellery have been associated specifically with Cartier. W.A. Bolin has both a panther bracelet and a panther collier from Cartier in this fall's auction. The panther jewellery was Cartier's trademark and made famous primarily by Cartier's legendary buyer Wallis Simpson, later on Duchess of Windsor, who married the abdicated King Edward VIII of England.

WA6

The most expensive lot of the auction, however, is a pair of spectacular single stone ear studs in 18k white gold with 2 diamonds, 4.10 ct W (H) vs2 according to certificate and 4.12 according to information. They have an estimate of $216 000.

W.A. Bolin is both an auction house that specializes in jewellery and silver as well as a jeweller. The company has been run by the Bolin family since 1791 when it was founded in St. Petersburg and Moscow as the Tsar's Court Jeweler, and became the Royal Swedish Court Jeweller in 1916. The company has been continuously run by the Bolin family for 223 years and is today run by the seventh generation.

The auction takes place on November 16th at 11:00 a.m CET with viewings from November 10 – 15th. You can search the entire catalogue here.

Story and photos via W.A. Bolins.

Comment