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The trend finds its roots in the 1800s, when decorative arts and pieces of furniture were either carved out of or adorned in malachite. Incredibly, its history goes even further back to the Ancient Greeks, who used dye from malachite as an eyeshadow.

blog.php-459 A pair of table lamps depicting ancient figurines with plinths of simulated malachite. On sale at Leclere.

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blog.php-461 Wooden coffee table blackened and malachite veneer. On sale at Leclere.

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A small malachite desk clock by Pierez, Geneva; with an additional malachite egg. On sale at Leclere A small malachite desk clock by Pierez, Geneva; with an additional malachite egg. On sale at Leclere.

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blog.php-466 Large Russian malachite tazza, circa 1840. On sale at Sotheby's.

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Hermes Birkin 30 Bag Emeraude (Emerald) Porosus Crocodile Palladium. On sale at Mightychic. Hermes Birkin 30 Bag Emeraude (Emerald) Porosus Crocodile Palladium. On sale at Mightychic.

What is Malachite?

The term Malachite derives from Ancient Greece, where the mineral was named after the green coloured leaves of the mallow plant. Malachite is a mineral consisting of a mixture of copper carbonate and a copper hydroxide, which combined create its sumptuous green colour. Malachite can be dissolved by acids and ammonia and becomes black when heated.

Malachite is predominately mined in France, Australia, USA, England, Romania and parts of Africa.

The stone has been used to make jewellery since 3000 BC. During the 1800s, when malachite became fashionable, a synthetic man-made mineral was created for furniture production.

Malachite is considered to have healing powers and is used to treat pain or stress in the body.

Visit Dealslands for special offers on more of this season's hottest trends.

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