Paul Storr is a star when it comes to English silver. During the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries Storr's Neoclassical style decorated the British royal household.

Storr's works were exceptionally grand and adorned with great details and were loved by the bourgeoisie, which began to establish itself in British society following the Industrial Revolution.

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Four silver wine coolers by Paul Storr, made in 1817 for Charles Chetwynd-Talbot 2nd Earl Talbot, will feature in Wannenes sale this month. The vessels are richly decorated with oak leaves and display the coats of arms of the Earl and his wife Frances Lambert.

Storr's designs can be found in many collections across Britain, including at Windsor Castle, Buckingham Palace and the Royal Pavilion in Brighton. His works feature in collections overseas in Melbourne, Montreal, New Orleans, Memphis and Lisbon. Even the White House, Washington D.C., has a gilded wine cooler by Storr in their collection.

An 1810 silver-gilt wine-cooler with bas-relief frieze, Vermeil Room, White House. Image: Whitehouse.gov An 1810 silver-gilt wine-cooler with bas-relief frieze, Vermeil Room, White House.
Image: Whitehouse.gov

Vermeil Room, White House Vermeil Room, White House

Storr made the cooler, which today resides in the Vermeil Room of the White House, was made in collaboration with the silversmith workshop Rundell Bridge & Rundell. Storr began designing with the workshop in 1803 and continued to do so for 20 years.

Wannenes will hold three sales in Genoa on 14th-15th November. Check out the full catalogue here.

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