The piece, entitled LimpetApology (traffic tenses), features both handmade and found objects used to create her collage-like works. In her abstract works, Marten invites the viewer to examine each object she uses within her installation to reassess everyday objects that we use in modern life. The viewer steps outside of their comfort zone in order to reexamine a world over saturated with images and advertising

Helen Marten, LimpetApology (traffictenses) 2015Image: Annik Wetter © The Artist; Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London; Greene Naftali, New York; Koenig Galerie, Berlin; T293, Rome and Naples. Helen Marten, LimpetApology (traffictenses) 2015
Image: Annik Wetter © The Artist; Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London; Greene Naftali, New York; Koenig Galerie, Berlin; T293, Rome and Naples.

1. It all started in Macclesfield

Marten was born in Macclesfield in 1985, with a twin sister. Marten's sister went on to be an accountant, with the artist describing the differences between the twins as: ''I have a linguistic brain, and she has a mathematical brain.''

Marten's mother is a biologist and her father is a chemist.

Helen Marten Helen Marten

2. Then to Naples

In 2010, Marten had her first solo show held at Naples' T293 Gallery, who continue to represent the artist.

3. A dabble in animation 

In 2011, Marten showcased her animation film Dust and Piranhas which explored sculpture and CGI technologies, before returning to her mixed-media installations.

4. It all begins with words

Although Marten's works may have an air of spontaneity, each works is carefully planned out. ''I store up phrases, a bank of words that are the starting point for thinking about an accumulation of physical stuff,'' Marten says of her process, which begins with her precisely drawing out each of her works.

Ceramicists, metalworkers, carpenters, embroiderers are all key to Marten's works. ''I don't shop for things. I know what it is I am searching for. Almost nothing is a readymade. If it looks like it is, it's almost certainly a deliberate approximation,'' says the artist.

5. Double whammy

The Turner Prize was the second prize Marten won in a month, as she also picked up the inaugural Hepworth Prize.

2016 Turner Prize winner Helen Marten and the other three shortlist artists' works will be on display at the Tate Britain until 2nd January, 2017. See here for more information.

Comment