Born in Surrey in 1908, artist Victor Pasmore first picked up the paintbrush to capture the views of London and the River Thames in the style of English Romanticist J.M.W Turner.

One of Pasmore's first exhibitions was at London's Zwemmer gallery in 1934 where his work was clearly influenced by French Impressionists Monet and Cézanne. But it was for his abstract art and architecture that Pasmore will be remembered as a pioneering creative force in Britain.

 VICTOR PASMORE, 'Points of Contact No.8 1966', original screenprint and collage in colours, 1966, signed in biro with the monogrammed dated '66, numbered in pencil from edition 70, published by Marlborough Graphics, 81cm x 77cm overall, framed and glazed VICTOR PASMORE, 'Points of Contact No.8 1966', original screenprint and collage in colours, 1966, signed in biro with the monogrammed dated '66, numbered in pencil from edition 70, published by Marlborough Graphics, 81cm x 77cm overall, framed and glazed

The following two decades, inspired by Piet Mondrian and Paul Klee, Pasmore made a move into abstract art. After the Second World War, Pasmore became a pioneer for the revival of Constructivism in Britain.

His dedication to the arts and architecture of Britain led to him sculpting both the physical and conceptual landscape of his homeland. He was commissioned to make a mural for the new Newcastle Civic Centre. Which led to him being appointed Consulting Director of Architectural Design for the County Durham town of Peterlee, which was built under the New Towns Act of 1946.

Victor Pasmore by Jorge ('J.S.') Lewinski bromide print on card mount, 1964 Estate of Jorge Lewinski"NPG Victor Pasmore
by Jorge ('J.S.') Lewinski
bromide print on card mount, 1964
Estate of Jorge Lewinski"
NPG

Pasmore's stamp on British culture would continue way into the next decade. He represented Britain at the 1961 Venice Biennale.

Pasmore's talent went beyond his own art, becoming an influential figure of Britain's art teaching. He gave a lecture on J.M.W. Turner as 'first of the moderns' to the Turner Society, of which he was elected a vice president in 1975.

Pasmore became a leading figure for both abstract art and reforming of the fine art education system in Britain. He taught at Camberwell School of Art from 1943 to 1949, where he taught Terry Frost. Pasmore threw away the rulebook and encouraged Frost to study the works of art in the National Gallery.

After his time at Camberwell, from 1954 to 1961, Pasmore became the leader of the art course of Kings College, Durham. It was here that he developed an art and design course inspired by the Bauhaus that became the model for higher arts education across the UK.

Victor Pasmore's Points of Contact No.8, 1966, will be featured in Lots Road's auction on 28th May, 2017. Check out the full catalogue here.

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