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The exhibition takes its name from Bhupen's 1981 work You Can’t Please All, which portrays a naked subject watching an Aesop fable, a work which the Tate acquired in 1996. Bhupen was a key figure in India's modern art movement, his importance will be honoured with an exhibition featuring more than 70 works, from collections around the globe, including watercolours and ceramics.

Bhupen Khakhar You Can't Please All 1981 Tate © ​Estate of Bhupen Khakhar Bhupen Khakhar
You Can't Please All 1981
Tate © ​Estate of Bhupen Khakhar

Born in Bombay in 1934, Bhupen lived and studied in Baroda at the Maharaja Siyajirao University. Bhupen's early works of the first half of the 1970's featured India's worksmen and tradesmen, capturing the modern Indian male experience. His later works juxtaposed ancient art and fables with modern life and art practices.

Bhupen Khakhar American Survey Officer 1969 Kiran Nadar Museum of Art Bhupen Khakhar
American Survey Officer 1969
Kiran Nadar Museum of Art

''There was a dark side to Bhupen, he did see the emptiness of many peoples lives.'' -Timothy Hyman at Salon: Art History, Art Basel, 2013

Khakhar openly explored homosexual themes within his work, focusing on same-sex intimacy within Indian society. The autobiographical element of his work was strikingly honest.

''You Can’t Please All' has been curated by Chris Dercon, Director of Tate Modern and Nada Raza, the museum's Assistant Curator. The exhibition is parrot the Tate and Deutsche Bank partnership which has a particular focus on African and Asian art.

For more information, see here.

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