Christopher Kane's torn creations draw comparisons to American sculptor John Chamberlain's works in which he coats crushed automobile parts in Pop art colours.

_KAN0163_452x678_1 Christopher Kane Summer 2016 collection
Image via Vogue

_KAN0057_592x888_1 Christopher Kane Summer 2016 collection
Image via Vogue

John Chamberlain, Divine Ricochet, 1991 Image via Guggenheim John Chamberlain, Divine Ricochet, 1991
Image via Guggenheim

_KAN0069_1280x1920 Christopher Kane Summer 2016 collection
Image via Vogue

_ARC0013_452x678_1 Anya Hindmarch ready-to-wear Spring/Summer 2016
Image via Vogue

Anya Hindmarch presented to the London fashion scene nostalgic pieces, with patterns inspired by the British high street, including John Lewis, the diagonal lines, and even Mothercare and WHSmith's use of primary colours in their branding.

The pieces in the collection focus on lines, shape and tessellation, evoking the colours and lines of Op artist Bridget Riley.

Bridget Riley's Arrest 3, 1965. Image via Bridget Riley. Courtesy Karsten Schubert, London. Bridget Riley/PR Bridget Riley's Arrest 3, 1965.
Image via Bridget Riley. Courtesy Karsten Schubert, London. Bridget Riley/PR

Bridget Riley by Ida Kar Image via the National Portrait Gallery Bridget Riley by Ida Kar
Image via the National Portrait Gallery

Other notable collections from London Fashion Week which nod to the visual art world includes Giles pieces with a Tribal art theme, Roksanda Ilincic's bold lines inspired by the 1960s era of design and Ashley William's punk inspired pieces.

Giles, Spring/Summer 2016 ready-to-wear Image via Vogue Giles, Spring/Summer 2016 ready-to-wear
Image via Vogue

Roksanda Ilincic Spring/Summer 2016 ready-to-wear Image via Vogue Roksanda Ilincic Spring/Summer 2016 ready-to-wear
Image via Vogue

Ashley Williams Spring/Summer 2016 ready-to-wear Image via Vogue Ashley Williams Spring/Summer 2016 ready-to-wear
Image via Vogue

 

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