Check out a selection of Barnebys favourite looks in the gallery above.

To mark the new-age theme, Barnebys have selected artists who have, in some way, worked with and pioneered technology in art.

Rembrandt

Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn, Self Portrait in a Cap, Open-Mouthed 1630. Image via: The Morgan Library & Museum Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn, Self Portrait in a Cap, Open-Mouthed
1630.
Image via: The Morgan Library & Museum

The technique of using chemicals to create etchings was developed by Arabic armouries In the Middle Ages as a way to decorate their weapons. In the first decades of the 17th century, Dutch artists experimented with etching, but it was Rembrandt who brought etching to the forefront.

During his career, Rembrandt produced nearly 300 etchings and at the end of the 17th century and even into the 18th century, prints were being made from Rembrandt's plates.

Alexander Calder

Alexander Calder in his Roxbury studio, 1941 Image via Tate Modern Alexander Calder in his Roxbury studio, 1941
Image via Tate Modern

Alexander Calder was the pioneer for kinetic sculpture. Calder had originally trained as an engineer, and by 1931 he had fused his talents for art and engineering when he created his first mobile.

Calder's vividly coloured kinetic wire mobiles were inspired by the circus and cabaret. These iconic pieces by Calder led to the invention of the mobile, a termed first used by Marcel Duchamp. These sculptures were key in bringing the art form into the fourth dimension.

Andy Warhol

Working with Gerard Malanga on silk-screening 'Campbell's Soup Can' paintings at The Factory in 1965 Image via Phaidon Working with Gerard Malanga on silk-screening 'Campbell's Soup Can' paintings at The Factory in 1965
Image via Phaidon

Screen printing is synonymous with Warhol. The technique has its history dating back to 1 000 years, where is was invented in China, during the Song Dynasty. Like Rembrandt's etchings, it was Warhol who developed the technique into a celebrated art form.

Warhol began experimenting with screenprinting in the 1960's, with his first published series depicting Marilyn Monroe.

In order to create a screenprint, a stencil is placed on top of a sheet and then ink is pushed through the stencil. Originally, silk was used, hence the term silkscreen, but with silk being costly, Warhol introduced the use of modern material including nylon and polyester.

Kenneth Snelson

Kenneth Snelson, Forest Devil's Moon Night, 1991. Image via Kennethsnelson.net Kenneth Snelson, Forest Devil's Moon Night, 1991.
Image via Kennethsnelson.net

The late 1970's and early 1980's marked a turning point for technology, as it was now being used in industries that had never delved into these new-age realms before.

In the late 1970's, both Apple and Microsoft had invented the first personal computers, whilst the silver screen was now taking full advantage of computer graphics and special effects, with films like Tron, 1982, paving the way for green screen.

Artist and sculptor Kenneth Snelson created works which used 3D computer animation. Snelson's work places two similar images using the 3D program to create the illusion of his objects being 3D, a technique which he describes as ''floating compression.''

Damien Hirst 

Kenneth Snelson, Forest Devil's Moon Night, 1991. Image via Kennethsnelson.net Kenneth Snelson, Forest Devil's Moon Night, 1991.
Image via Kennethsnelson.net

In 1975, a nine year old Damien Hirst, sat watching Blue Peter, wide-eyed as the host created ''spin'' art.

Years later, in 1992 at his Brixton studio, Hirst began experimenting with the technique. Although in no way his own creation, like Rembrandt and Warhol, Hirst brought the technique to the art market.

Hirst commented on the works ''childish'' qualities and how the process of creating them excites him "I really like making them. And I really like the machine, and I really like the movement. Every time they're finished, I'm desperate to do another one."

Chris Milk

Chris Milk's haunting shadow angels are created using three 30-foot high white panel frames suspended from the ceiling on which digitally captured shadows are reprojected.

A shallow reflecting pool sits between the viewers and the screens, whilst in the background, an openFrameworks application uses the Microsoft Kinect SDK for Windows program.

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