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A PAIR OF EARLY GEORGE III GILTWOOD PIER GLASSES
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About the object

A PAIR OF EARLY GEORGE III GILTWOOD PIER GLASSES\nThe design attributed to John Vardy and the carving attributed to his brother Thomas Vardy\nEach with a rounded rectangular Regency plate flanked by palms and a pair of tritons holding laurel garlands across the plate, below a scrolled broken pediment centred by an eagle with outspread wings incorporated into the pediment, the sides with entrelac roundels, the apron with a shell flanked on each side by scrolled acanthus, probably originally with a chain or rope from the eagle's beak to the ring below, each with two holes for branches, previously with paper backing, with hessian covering over old paper, both with several room location inscriptions\n93 in. x 58 in. (236 cm. x 147 cm.)\nThe plates approx. 66 in. x 35 in. (167.5 cm. x 89 cm.) (2)
GB
GB
GB

notes

THE EVOLUTION OF THE DESIGN

Their open pediments recall Inigo Jones's Roman patterned chimneypiece invented for Wilton House and illustrated in Vardy's pattern-book entitled, Some Designs of Mr. Inigo Jones and Mr. William Kent, 1744, pl. 13. The Bernini-fashioned tritons can be related to the nereids or water-nymphs on a candlestick pattern invented for George II by William Kent (d.1748), and to the latter's nereid-drawn barge invented for Frederick, Prince of Wales, both of which were illustrated in Vardy's Some Designs (pls. 18 and 53). Elements such as eagle-born laurels and amorini-inhabited palms had been incorporated in 'Inigo Jones' architecture in Charles I's Greenwich Palace apartment (featured in ibid., pls. 5 and 4).

Vardy himself had introduced a foliage-framed shell in his 1749 design for George II's state bed, now at Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire (see G. Beard, Upholsterers and Interior Furnishing in England 1530-1840, London, 1997, figs. 216-218). The present pier-glass evolved in particular from the late 1750s pier-glass that he designed for an apartment at Spencer House, with an alcoved niche recreating the Jonesian Greenwich Palace design.

THE ORNAMENT

'Bolton' rings, suspended from the mirror cornices are guarded by confronted eagles, sacred to Jupiter, and here recalling the Bolton family's ancient 'falcon' crest. Their feathers embrace the volute scrolls of the Roman-temple pediment, which is enriched with echinois egg-and-dart mouldings and supported by projecting Corinthian pilasters.

The rings are entwined with triumphally-arched palm branches and laurel festoons borne by zephyr-winged tritons. These chimerical serpent-tailed loves, attendants of the nature goddess Venus, were invented by poets to symbolise the elements of air and water. They have fountain-like perches of husk-festooned, pearled and imbricated patterae, and these serve as ribbon-guilloches with which they draw the scallop-shell chariot of the nature goddess Venus displayed in foliated and scallop-winged cartouches at the base of the mirror.

THE GILDING

The mirrors have been water gilded twice. In some areas the second gilding, probably early 19th Century, is separated from the first by a thin skim of gesso. The original gilding and the second gilding is identical on both pairs of pier tables (lots 53 and 55) and their mirrors (lots 52 and 54).

title

A PAIR OF EARLY GEORGE III GILTWOOD PIER GLASSES

medium

Each with a rounded rectangular Regency plate flanked by palms and a pair of tritons holding laurel garlands across the plate, below a scrolled broken pediment centred by an eagle with outspread wings incorporated into the pediment, the sides with entrelac roundels, the apron with a shell flanked on each side by scrolled acanthus, probably originally with a chain or rope from the eagle's beak to the ring below, each with two holes for branches, previously with paper backing, with hessian covering over old paper, both with several room location inscriptions

dimensions

93 in. x 58 in. (236 cm. x 147 cm.) The plates approx. 66 in. x 35 in. (167.5 cm. x 89 cm.) (2)

provenance

Supplied to Charles Powlett, 5th Duke of Bolton (d.1765).

Sold in 1935 to William Berry, 1st Viscount Camrose (d.1954) and by descent.


*Note that the price is not recalculated to the current value, but refers to the actual final price at the time the product was sold.

*Note that the price is not recalculated to the current value, but refers to the actual final price at the time the product was sold.


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