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[ Coins ] Indian Eagles 1920-S $10 MS66 PCGS
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[ Coins ] Indian Eagles 1920-S $10 MS66 PCGS. This year marked the first production of gold coinage since 1916. From the time 126,500 eagles were struck at the San Francisco Mint in 1920, they were considered one of the rarest of all 20th century ten dollar gold coins Evidently, nearly all were exported in commercial trade, or held in Treasury vaults and eventually melted in the 1930s. No hoards have ever turned up and the coin remains very rare to this day. T. Louis Comparette, curator of the Philadelphia Mint coin collection, was an important conduit of new coins for the Connecticut State Library's Mitchelson Collection and a few other institutions. Although specimens struck in Philadelphia were usually available with little difficulty, pieces from the other mints were available only from the pyx coins reserved for use of the Annual Assay Commission. (Collectors could usually purchase issued coins directly from each mint, but the quality of specimens was often well below the pyx coins.) On March 1, 1921, Comparette sent George Godard, the Connecticut State Librarian, two of the San Francisco eagles. Here are two eagles struck at the San Francisco Mint in 1920. With some difficulty I was able to secure four specimens from the pyx, of which I send you these, one for your collections, the other for Sen. Hall, whose interests I am still willing to assist, though he will not answer my letters. One of these was acquired by Godard from the estate of Connecticut State Senator William Henry Hall, whose personal collection included the duplicates sent by Comparette. It was sold by Stack's with Godard's personal collection in 1982. The other remains in the Mitchelson Collection. The Smithsonian National Numismatic Collection includes an example that was likely a third coin saved from the pyx. The fact that individual specimens of this issue are so easily traced und
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*Note that the price is not recalculated to the current value, but refers to the actual final price at the time the product was sold.

*Note that the price is not recalculated to the current value, but refers to the actual final price at the time the product was sold.


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