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[ Coins ] Undated M.4-C
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[ Coins ] Undated M.4-C
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About the object

[ Coins ] Undated M.4-C, Baker 11. Washington ``Pattern'' Shield. Rarity-8. About Uncirculated. Morristown Mint (?). 134.4 gns. The Finest of Three Known, better looking than J.W. Garrett's, not holed like Roper's. The cataloguer has seen all three of the survivors. The obverse is a medium golden brown in color with a few areas darker brown, nearly black, principally at the right side and on Washington's jawline. The reverse, by contrast, is a nearly uniform shade of the same color, with just one set of vertical lines in the field showing a trifle darker. The obverse was struck about perfectly centered, being slightly tight to the upper left but without noticeable effect. The reverse is somewhat tight at the top and right but there is additional metal showing beyond the beaded border at the lower left, suggesting that the die was about the right size for the planchet module chosen. The surfaces on both sides are, in the fields, mostly smooth and hard and on the obverse have some light reflectivity The centers are a trifle rough, particularly on the high points, there clearly being insufficient metal to fill the lowest recesses of both dies. Washington's features are mostly full and sharp, almost all of his hair detail can be seen save for that on the highest portion of the die, and even the outline of his epaulet can be made out without the aid of magnification. The ruffles on his chest and the buttons and buttonholes in his uniform show clearly. On the reverse, the highest portions of the central vertical shield lines are indistinct, but the centers of the horizontal ones are still mostly bold and sharp. The obverse shows a planchet cutter lip almost clear around, showing that the planchet cutter sliced through the blank from what became the reverse side towards the obverse. The obverse letters were handpunched into the die, and appear to have been from a punch set that was not particularly well made. There is absolutely nothing in the fabric of the piece or in its apparent method of manufacture to suggest anything other than an American origin for the coin. The obverse die work, which has been taken by some to suggest an English origin, has no elements that, to the cataloguer's mind, demand a British author for the die. Even Crosby, that stalwart champion of the superiority of British numismatic craftsmanship, admitted that its reverse was more than likely an American product. Both sides appear to be in their perfect states. The discovery specimen of Maris 4-C, the ``New Jersey Washington,'' is said to have been found by Captain Haseltine amongst an accumulation of 1,000 coppers owned by an old lady grocer who had received them in change over the years. Haseltine offered the then unique coin to Dr. Maris priced at $50, but Maris declined the offer. Haseltine thereupon sold it to Sylvester Crosby for $150, three times the price Haseltine had quoted to Maris. Crosby proudly showed off his new coin at the February 5, 1875 meeting of the Boston Numismatic Society but by then it was one of three known, the other two being owned by William Sumner Appleton. Later, when Haseltine sold Crosby's coins, the piece realized $620.{cp8}(SEE COLOR PLATE) Ex Edgar H. Adams; David Proskey; Hillyer Ryder; F.C.C. Boyd Estate.
US
NY, US
US

*Note that the price is not recalculated to the current value, but refers to the actual final price at the time the product was sold.

*Note that the price is not recalculated to the current value, but refers to the actual final price at the time the product was sold.


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