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DESC-An extremely rare blue and white 'ducks' Bowl mark and period
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DESC-An extremely rare blue and white 'ducks' Bowl mark and period of Chenghua the finely potted rounded sides painted with a frieze of a lotus pond with three pairs of mandarin ducks, some captured in mid-flight, others swimming across the gently rippled water amid clumps of lotus, frilly-edged pads and millet stands, between a band of five scaly dragons pacing amid clouds below the flaring rim and a border of breaking waves circling the tapered footring, all divided by double-lines, the interior centred with a matching medallion of two ducks in flight, a narrow collar of lanAa characters at the rim 16.7 cm., 6 1/2 in., condition report available No Chenghua bowl of this design appears to have been published and the design is as yet unrecorded even among the sherds discovered at the site of the Ming imperial kilns at Jingdezhen. The design is based on a Xuande original, where the duck pond is, however, executed in polychrome enamels (wucai); it continued to be used in various wucai ('five colour') versions on dishes and bowls of the interregnum and Chenghua periods, and was revived again in the Qing dynasty in the doucai colour scheme. Although no other Chenghua example appears to have survived, other versions of the duck pond design are known from the Chenghua stratum of the Ming imperial kiln site at Jingdezhen, without dragons, both with and without lanca characters. In the Qing dynasty, the design still seems to have been considered a Chenghua pattern, since Qing examples exist with a spurious Chenghua mark. A unique example of the polychrome Xuande prototype has recently been discovered at the Saka Temple in Tibet, and is illustrated in Yeh Pei-Lang, Beauty of Ceramics, vol.7: Gems of the Wucai Porcelain, Taipei, 1996, pl. 60, and again in Chugoku no t_oji, vol.9, Tokyo, 1996, pl.6, together with a fragmentary wucai dish of Xuande mark and period, pl.7, recovered from the waste heaps of the Jingdezhen kilns, which is decorated with a duck pond both inside and out and has a lanca inscription around the rim. An unfinished wucai duck-pond bowl which was never enamelled, recovered from the Jingdezhen site was included in the exhibitions Imperial Porcelain: Recent Discoveries of Jingdezhen Ware, Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, 1995, no.82, and Yuan's and Ming's Imperial Porcelains Unearthed from Jingdezhen, Yan-Huang Art Museum, Beijing, 1999, no.278, where it is attributed to the Zhengtong period of the interregnum; and a finished wucai bowl of this type, also unmarked, is published in Geng Baochang, Ming Qing ciqi jianding, Beijing, 1993, col.pl.42, who attributes it to the Chenghua reign. This version of the design, however, is much simpler, showing neither dragons nor the lanca script, and having a lotus petal border above a plain foot with line borders. From the Chenghua stratum of the imperial kiln site we also know two types of wucai dishes of Chenghua mark and period, painted with ducks in a lotus pond; see the exhibitions A Legacy of Chenghua, The Tsui Museum of Art, Hong Kong, 1993, cat.nos.A3 and A4; and The Emperor's broken china: Reconstructing Chenghua porcelain, Sotheby's, London, 1995, cat.nos.143 and 144. One of these dishes repeats the Xuande pattern, the other, without lanca, matches that of the unmarked Zhengtong/Chenghua bowls. The full version of this design, with dragons above a lotus pond with ducks, and a line of lanca characters on the inside, was revived again in the Qing dynasty, and is known from bowls of wide U-shaped form with Qianlong, Jiaqing and Daoguang reign marks, as well as a spurious Chenghua mark. The Chenghua exhibition at the National Palace Museum, Taiwan, included one example of each; see Ming Chenghua ciqi tezhan, Taipei, 1976, cat.nos.84-87.\nQuantity: 1
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DESC-An extremely rare blue and white 'ducks' Bowl mark and period of Chenghua the finely potted rounded sides painted with a frieze of a lotus pond with three pairs of mandarin ducks, some captured in mid-flight, others swimming across the gently rippled water amid clumps of lotus, frilly-edged pads and millet stands, between a band of five scaly dragons pacing amid clouds below the flaring rim and a border of breaking waves circling the tapered footring, all divided by double-lines, the interior centred with a matching medallion of two ducks in flight, a narrow collar of lanAa characters at the rim 16.7 cm., 6 1/2 in., condition report available No Chenghua bowl of this design appears to have been published and the design is as yet unrecorded even among the sherds discovered at the site of the Ming imperial kilns at Jingdezhen. The design is based on a Xuande original, where the duck pond is, however, executed in polychrome enamels (wucai); it continued to be used in various wucai ('five colour') versions on dishes and bowls of the interregnum and Chenghua periods, and was revived again in the Qing dynasty in the doucai colour scheme. Although no other Chenghua example appears to have survived, other versions of the duck pond design are known from the Chenghua stratum of the Ming imperial kiln site at Jingdezhen, without dragons, both with and without lanca characters. In the Qing dynasty, the design still seems to have been considered a Chenghua pattern, since Qing examples exist with a spurious Chenghua mark. A unique example of the polychrome Xuande prototype has recently been discovered at the Saka Temple in Tibet, and is illustrated in Yeh Pei-Lang, Beauty of Ceramics, vol.7: Gems of the Wucai Porcelain, Taipei, 1996, pl. 60, and again in Chugoku no t_oji, vol.9, Tokyo, 1996, pl.6, together with a fragmentary wucai dish of Xuande mark and period, pl.7, recovered from the waste heaps of the Jingdezhen kilns, which is decorated with a duck pond both inside and out and has a lanca inscription around the rim. An unfinished wucai duck-pond bowl which was never enamelled, recovered from the Jingdezhen site was included in the exhibitions Imperial Porcelain: Recent Discoveries of Jingdezhen Ware, Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, 1995, no.82, and Yuan's and Ming's Imperial Porcelains Unearthed from Jingdezhen, Yan-Huang Art Museum, Beijing, 1999, no.278, where it is attributed to the Zhengtong period of the interregnum; and a finished wucai bowl of this type, also unmarked, is published in Geng Baochang, Ming Qing ciqi jianding, Beijing, 1993, col.pl.42, who attributes it to the Chenghua reign. This version of the design, however, is much simpler, showing neither dragons nor the lanca script, and having a lotus petal border above a plain foot with line borders. From the Chenghua stratum of the imperial kiln site we also know two types of wucai dishes of Chenghua mark and period, painted with ducks in a lotus pond; see the exhibitions A Legacy of Chenghua, The Tsui Museum of Art, Hong Kong, 1993, cat.nos.A3 and A4; and The Emperor's broken china: Reconstructing Chenghua porcelain, Sotheby's, London, 1995, cat.nos.143 and 144. One of these dishes repeats the Xuande pattern, the other, without lanca, matches that of the unmarked Zhengtong/Chenghua bowls. The full version of this design, with dragons above a lotus pond with ducks, and a line of lanca characters on the inside, was revived again in the Qing dynasty, and is known from bowls of wide U-shaped form with Qianlong, Jiaqing and Daoguang reign marks, as well as a spurious Chenghua mark. The Chenghua exhibition at the National Palace Museum, Taiwan, included one example of each; see Ming Chenghua ciqi tezhan, Taipei, 1976, cat.nos.84-87.


*Note that the price is not recalculated to the current value, but refers to the actual final price at the time the product was sold.

*Note that the price is not recalculated to the current value, but refers to the actual final price at the time the product was sold.


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