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Marie Laurencin
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Marie Laurencin
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Marie Laurencin

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About the object

Marie Laurencin (1883 Paris - 1956 Paris). Femme à la robe verte. 1933 Oil on canvas .Marchesseau 561 (vol. I, p. 246). Signed and dated upper left.41 x 33 cm (16,1 x 12,9 in). Provenienz: Estate Hilde Gerst.Rae H. Eckman, New York.Wally Findlay Galleries, New York. Born in Paris on 31 October 1883, Marie Laurencin originally trained as a porcelain painter at Sèvres before switching to the Académie Humbert, where she made the acquaintance of Georges Braque. Through Braque she made friends with Picasso and thus gained entry to the Bateau-Lavoir circle of artists in Montmartre. In 1907 Marie Laurencin met Guillaume Apollinaire, with whom she embarked on a liaison that would last several years. That same year Marie Laurencin debuted at the Salon des Indépendants. Picasso and Apollinaire sponsored her and saw that she took part in the aesthetic discussions that would soon lead to Cubism. Laurencin's own work was largely untouched by this; it features mainly lyrical motifs in delicate gradations of pastel colours. This sensitive and subtly inventive approach to colour, made it possible to vary forms and motifs so that they did not become too repetitive. The stylistic influences on Marie Laurencin include Persian miniature painting and Rococo art. In 1912 Marie Laurencin had shows of her work at the La Boëtie et Barbazanges galleries. In 1913 Laurencin concluded a contract with Paul Rosenberg, an art dealer who also represented Matisse, Picasso and Braque. On the outbreak of the first world war, she fled to Spain, where she came into contact with Sonia and Robert Delaunay as well as Francis Picabia. After returning to Paris in 1921, the artist began on her most prolific phase. Apart from painting society portraits, Marie Laurencin did stage designs and costumes for the ballet and illustrated books. From 1932 she taught at the Villa Malakoff Art Academy in the 16th Arrondissement. All those delicate young women who have left such a lasting imprint on Marie Laurencin's aeuvre, seem to embody one woman: the artist herself. Those figures, introverted and enclosed within themselves, mark a new type in modern portrayals of women. Laurencin's women are more than aware of their femaleness. They act as if there were no one else; the world around them seems to have shut out. Here a personality has been imaged that looks vulnerable, so harmless does it seem, but the statement it makes tends to be ambivalent, basically only touching one side but with an immediacy addressed by no other artist of the time. Marie Laurencin died in Paris on 8 June 1956. [KD]In good condition, colours still fresh. Rubbed due to the framing, partly with smaller colour chippings. Pin holes in the corners. Isolated barely noticeable craquelé and minor rubbing.
US
NY, US
US

*Note that the price is not recalculated to the current value, but refers to the actual final price at the time the product was sold.

*Note that the price is not recalculated to the current value, but refers to the actual final price at the time the product was sold.


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