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[ USA - COINS ] 1933 Superb Gem Brilliant Uncirculated
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[ USA - COINS ] 1933 Superb Gem Brilliant Uncirculated. Almost certainly the finest known example of this last date of $10 coinage, this totally satisfying example offers smooth, magnificent amber- glowing mint frost enriching a meticulous strike. Lustre and strike are both finer than those of typical 1933?s described by gold coin researcher David W. Akers. The digit ?1? in the date is only marginally less sharp than the ?933?, and the richly lustrous surfaces are free of the copper spots cited by Akers. Close study under magnification reveals two minute tics on Liberty?s jaw, one over the ?P? of PLURIBUS that keep this exciting super-Gem from an even higher grade. There was never any question of legality for the Gold Eagles of 1933, as a small number was lawfully released. U.S. Mint records record six shipments of 1933 Eagles made between Jan.19, 1933 and March 3, comprising 312,500 pieces. The first batch was delivered on Jan. 19, 1933 with 100 reserved and shipped to the Treasurer of the U.S. for departmental assay. A total of 313 Eagles were sent for examination and testing by the U.S. Assay Commission which met on February 14 and 15, 1934. Nearly the entire 1933 mintage was subsequently remelted, pursuant to President Franklin D. Roosevelt?s orders suspending coinage and circulation of gold. The Eagles not destroyed after the Assay Commission meeting of 1934 were returned to the U.S. Mint Cashier?s Department, headed by Cashier George A. McCann, later a key figure in the controversy over the escape of the 1933 Double Eagles through Philadelphia jeweler Israel Switt (see below). In his 1980 United States Gold Coins, an Analysis of Auction Records, Volume V, Eagles, researcher David W. Akers estimated the total number of 1933 Eagles extant at 30 to 40, tracing only 20 auction appearances between 1944 and 1978. Akers? 1988 Handbook of 20th Century United States Gold Coins reduced his estimate of survivors to 30-34 pieces, stating ?I do not know of any Superb (MS-67) examples, but the Delp, Bareford, Kruthoffer, Eliasberg and Stack?s October Sale specimens were all gems, and the Einstein Collection coin was very close.? The late Walter Breen wrote ?About 1952, a small hoard, possibly 20-30 in all, probably the majority of the coins issued, showed up on the East Coast. (I studied eight of them on a single tray in 1953: gem mint-state beauties).? The Jeff Garrett-John Dannreuther The Official Red Book of Auction Records, 1994-2003, U.S. Gold Coinage, records only eight appearances of this date, ranging from the Brilliant Uncirculated examples in Stack?s The population reports of major third-party grading services underscore the remarkable rarity of this date in any grade. Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) has graded ten pieces: two in MS-63, five in MS-64, two in MS- 65, and only one in MS66! Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) reports 21: one in MS-62; two in MS-63; 12 in MS-64 and six in MS-65. No coin has been assigned a higher grade by either service, and no known unincapsulated example equals or exceeds the present offering, whose appearance offers an historic opportunity for today?s collectors. NGC MS66. (SEE COLOR PLATE)
US
NY, US
US

*Note that the price is not recalculated to the current value, but refers to the actual final price at the time the product was sold.

*Note that the price is not recalculated to the current value, but refers to the actual final price at the time the product was sold.


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